Contents 1 Early life, education, and early political career 2 California Assembly (1982–1992, 1996–2000) 2.1 Elections 2.2 Tenure 2.3 Committee assignments 3 California Senate (2000–2008) 3.1 Elections 3.2 Tenure 3.3 Committee assignments 4 Statewide elections 4.1 1994 Controller election 4.2 2002 Controller election 4.3 2003 recall gubernatorial election 4.4 2006 gubernatorial election 5 U.S. House of Representatives 5.1 Elections 5.2 Tenure 5.3 Legislation 5.4 Committee assignments 5.5 Caucus memberships 6 Political positions 6.1 Animal rights 6.2 LGBT rights 6.3 Marijuana 7 Electoral history 8 References 9 External links


Early life, education, and early political career[edit] McClintock was born in White Plains, New York to a wealthy family and graduated in 1978 from UCLA. He was elected Chairman of the Ventura County Republican Party at age 23, and served until 1981. He was chief of staff to State Senator Ed Davis from 1980–82. From 1992–94, he served as the director of the Center for the California Taxpayer.[1] He was director of the Claremont Institute's Golden State Center for Policy Studies from 1995–96.[2] McClintock is one of a handful of representatives that do not live in their own district; he resides in Elk Grove, California, which is in California's 7th congressional district.[3]


California Assembly (1982–1992, 1996–2000)[edit] Elections[edit] McClintock ran for California's 36th State Assembly district, based in Thousand Oaks, in 1982 at the age of 26 after redistricting. He defeated Democrat Harriet Kosmo Henson 56–44%.[4] In 1984, he won re-election to a second term, defeating Tom Jolicoeur 72–28%.[5] In 1986, he won re-election to a third term, defeating Frank Nekimken 73–25%.[6] In 1988, he won re-election to a fourth term, defeating George Webb II 70–29%.[7] In 1990, he won re-election to a fifth term, defeating Ginny Connell 59–36%.[8] After running for Congress in 1992 and for controller in 1994, he decided to run for the Assembly again in 1996. He ran for California's 38th State Assembly district and defeated Democrat Jon Lauritzen 56–40% to win his sixth assembly term.[9] In 1998, McClintock won re-election to a seventh term unopposed.[10] Tenure[edit] He authored California’s lethal injection use for California's death penalty law. He also opposed tax increases and supported spending cuts. He was a strong proponent of abolishing the car tax.[11][12] Committee assignments[edit] This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (May 2017)


California Senate (2000–2008)[edit] Tom McClintock as a California State Senator Elections[edit] In 2000, he decided to retire from the California Assembly to run for California's 19th State Senate district. He ranked first in the May 7th open primary with 52% of the vote. In November, he defeated Democrat Daniel Gonzalez 58–42%.[13] In 2004, he won re-election to a second term, defeating Paul Joseph Graber 61–39%.[14] Tenure[edit] McClintock has a long history of opposing various tax increases. During the 2000 dot-com bubble, he was instrumental in proposing a two-thirds reduction in the vehicle license fee, or car tax. In 2003, he opposed then-Governor Gray Davis's attempt to rescind a rollback of a vehicle license fee.[15] McClintock has also opposed deficit reduction efforts that would have increased taxes. He supported the Bureaucracy Reduction and Closure Commission and performance-based budgeting.[16] In 2008, McClintock voted against Proposition 2, which prohibits confining calves, pigs and hens in small cages in which they cannot extend their limbs. "Farm animals are food, not friends," he said in response to backlash to his no vote. He also cited concern about increased grocery bills.[17] Committee assignments[edit] This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (October 2015)


Statewide elections[edit] 1994 Controller election[edit] Main article: California State Controller election, 1994 He ran for California State Controller after incumbent Democrat Gray Davis retired. He won the Republican primary, defeating John Morris, 61–39%.[18] In the general election, he faced Kathleen Connell, former Special Assistant to Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and Director of L.A. Housing Authority. Despite the fact that Connell outspent McClintock by a 3-to-1 margin, he only lost by two percentage points, 48–46%, with three other candidates receiving the other 6% of the vote.[19] 2002 Controller election[edit] Main article: California State Controller election, 2002 McClintock ran for State Controller again in 2002, facing Democratic nominee Steve Westly, an eBay executive. Westly outspent him 5-to-1. McClintock's campaigns focused on increasing accountability for the state budget. The ads featured the character Angus McClintock, a fictional cousin and fellow Scottish American extolling Tom McClintock's virtues of thriftiness and accountability with low-budget fifteen-second ads. He lost by a margin of just 0.2%, or 16,811 votes behind Westley, who won with a plurality of 45.3% of the vote. McClintock obtained 45.1% of the vote, while three other candidates obtained a combined 9.5% of the vote.[20] 2003 recall gubernatorial election[edit] Main article: California gubernatorial recall election In 2003, he ran for the recall election against incumbent Democrat Gray Davis. Film actor, Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger won the election 49% of the vote. Democratic Lieutenant Governor Cruz Bustamante finished second with 31% of the vote, which was about 17 points behind Schwarzenegger. McClintock finished in third place 14% of the vote, which was about 35 points behind Schwarzenegger. Together, Republicans Schwarzenegger and McClintock were supported by 5,363,778 Californians, or 62.1% of the vote. 132 other candidates obtained the remaining 6.4% of the vote.[21] McClintock performed the best in Stanislaus County, where he obtained 24% of the vote. He also cracked 20% or higher in several other counties: Mariposa (23%), Tuolumne (22%), Tehama (21%), Calaveras (20%), Madera (20%), Modoc (20%), Shasta (20%), San Joaquin (20%), and Ventura (20%).[22] 2006 gubernatorial election[edit] Main article: California lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2006 He ran for Lieutenant Governor in the 2006 elections. He defeated Tony Farmer in the Republican primary, 94–6%.[23] In the general election, he lost to Democratic State Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi 49–45%.[24]


U.S. House of Representatives[edit] Elections[edit] 1992 After redistricting, State Assemblyman McClintock decided to retire in order to challenge Democratic U.S. Congressman Anthony C. Beilenson in California's 24th congressional district. He won the nine-candidate Republican primary with a plurality of 34% of the vote, beating second-place finisher Sang Korman by eleven percentage points.[25] Beilenson defeated McClintock 56–39%.[26] 2008 Main article: United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2008 § District 4 On March 4, 2008, McClintock announced his candidacy for the U.S. House of Representatives in California's 4th congressional district, which is hundreds of miles away from the district McClintock represented in the state Senate. The district's nine-term incumbent, fellow Republican John Doolittle, decided to retire. McClintock was unable to vote for himself in either the primary or the general election because the California Constitution required him to maintain his legal residence in his State Senate district until the end of his Senate term. Furthermore, in order to vote using a ballot in regards to a specific congressional district, one must live within that district. Because Thousand Oaks is outside of California's Fourth Congressional District, McClintock was thus ineligible to vote for himself.[27] Upon McClintock's entry into the race, fellow Republicans Rico Oller and Eric Egland withdrew from the Republican primary and endorsed McClintock.[27][28] McClintock was endorsed by the Republican Liberty Caucus,[29] Club for Growth, and U.S. Congressman Ron Paul. McClintock faced former U.S. Congressman Doug Ose, a moderate represented the neighboring 3rd District from 1999 to 2005. Ose lived outside the district and was painted as a carpetbagger and a liberal who had voted to raise taxes and who voted for earmarks. McClintock defeated Ose 54–39%.[30] The Democratic nominee was retired Air Force Lt. Col. Charlie Brown, who ran an unexpectedly strong race against Doolittle in 2006. In March 2008, Ose's campaign commercials criticized McClintock for receiving payments totaling over $300,000 in per diem living expenses during his time in the California State Senate, despite the fact that he lived in Elk Grove, near Sacramento, for most of the year. McClintock maintained that the payments were justified because his legal residence was in Thousand Oaks, in his State Senate district. He stated, "Every legislator's [Sacramento area] residence is close to the Capitol. My residential costs up here are much greater than the average legislator because my family is here."[31] However, Ose's campaign commercials argued McClintock does not own or rent a home in the 19th district, but uses his mother's address. These attacks prompted a response from McClintock's wife, Lori, who said McClintock stays with his mother in order to better care for her after she fell ill and after the death of her husband.[32] McClintock ran ads attacking Brown’s participation at a 2005 protest by Code Pink, an infamous anti-war group, and argued Brown supported gay marriage but not the troops in Iraq. He also portrayed Brown as a clone of Speaker Nancy Pelosi.[12] By November 23, 2008, McClintock led Brown by 1,566 votes (0.4% of the vote), 184,190 to 182,624. Subsequent returns expanded the margin slightly with the last returns coming in from El Dorado County shortly after Thanksgiving. On December 1, 2008, McClintock declared victory and on December 3, 2008, Brown conceded the race. McClintock defeated Brown by a margin of 0.5%, or 1,800 votes.[33] He prevailed by a 3,500-vote margin in Placer County, the largest county in the district. Brown won just three of the district's nine counties: Sierra (49.8%), Plumas (47.9%), and Nevada (42.3%).[34][35] Ultimately, McClintock won mainly on the strength of coattails from John McCain, who carried the 4th with 54 percent of the vote, his fifth-best total in the state. 2010 Main article: United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2010 § District 4 McClintock was challenged in the Republican primary again, this time by Michael Babich. He easily defeated Babich 78–22%.[36] On November 2, he easily won re-election to a second term, defeating businessman Clint Curtis 61–31%, winning all of the counties in the district.[37] 2012 Main article: United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2012 § District 4 Redistricting pushed the 4th well to the south. It now stretched from the Sacramento suburbs to the outer suburbs of Fresno. Only three counties remained from the old 4th: Nevada, Placer, and El Dorado. However, it is as strongly Republican as its predecessor. He easily won re-election to a third term, defeating Democrat Jack Uppal 61–39%. He won all but two of the district's ten counties: Nevada (37%) and Alpine (41%).[38] 2014 Main article: United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2014 § District 4 McClintock won re-election, finishing first in California's "top two" primary, and defeating moderate Republican challenger, National Guard Major Art Moore in the general election, 60–40%.[39] 2016 Main article: United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2016 McClintock again finished first in the primary and subsequently defeated Democrat Robert W. Derlet, a physician, environmentalist and retired UC Davis professor, in the general election, 63–37%.[40][41] Tenure[edit] During the 112th Congress McClintock was one of 40 "staunch" members of the Republican Study Committee[42] who frequently voted against Republican party leadership and vocally expressed displeasure with House bills.[43] In 2011, McClintock voted against the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 as part of a controversial provision that allows the government and the military to indefinitely detain American citizens and others without trial.[44] McClintock's Chief of Staff, Igor Birman, was a candidate for Congress in California's 7th congressional district in 2014. In 2009, McClintock signed a pledge sponsored by Americans for Prosperity promising to vote against any global warming legislation that would raise taxes.[45] McClintock voted in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[46] He voted against the first version of the bill, displeased with the removal of deductions related to medical expenses, student loan interest and casualty loss. Those three items were addressed in the final version of the bill which McClintock voted 'yay'. McClintock claims the bill will "restore American workers to an internationally competitive position." He has expressed concern regarding the bill's impact on the budget deficit and anticipates that it will be addressed "by spending reforms this coming year."[47] Legislation[edit] McClintock supported the Water Rights Protection Act, a bill that would prevent federal agencies from requiring certain entities to relinquish their water rights to the United States in order to use public lands.[48] The bill was a reaction to the United States Forest Service's decision to pursue a "new regulation to demand that water rights be transferred to the federal government as a condition for obtaining permits needed to operate 121 ski resorts that cross over federal lands."[49] McClintock supported the bill, saying that the Forest Service's regulation "illustrates an increasingly hostile attitude by this agency toward those who make productive use of our vast national forests, in this case by enhancing and attracting the tourism upon which our mountain communities depend."[49] For his five terms in office, McClintock was the primary sponsor of three bills that were enacted into law. On June 14, 2013, McClintock introduced the bill To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to take certain Federal lands located in El Dorado County, California, into trust for the benefit of the Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians (H.R. 2388; 113th Congress), a bill that would take specified federal land in El Dorado County, California, into trust for the Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians.[50] The other two bills were to rename Post Offices. (H.R. 3892 and H.R. 3319).[51] Committee assignments[edit] Committee on the Budget Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on Indian and Alaska Native Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Lands (Chairman) Subcommittee on Water and Power Caucus memberships[edit] Congressional Arts Caucus Republican Study Committee Tea Party Caucus American Sikh Congressional Caucus Liberty Caucus


Political positions[edit] Animal rights[edit] McClintock has said that "farm animals are food, not friends."[17] He supports sterilization of wild horses for population control.[52] LGBT rights[edit] McClintock opposes same-sex marriage and in 2008, stated "calling a homosexual partnership a marriage doesn’t make it one."[17] Marijuana[edit] McClintock has a "B" rating from NORML regarding his voting record on cannabis-related matters. He has never used marijuana and supports in-school education regarding the "risks and dangers that it poses." He believes that states should have the right to set their own legislation regarding cannabis. He supports veterans gaining access to medical marijuana, if legal in their state, per their Veterans Health Administration doctor's recommendation. He supports hemp farming.[53]


Electoral history[edit] California State Assembly District 36 election, 1982[54] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 60,702 55.9 Democratic Harriet Kosmo Henson 47,932 44.1 Total votes 108,634 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Assembly District 36 election, 1984[55] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 94,391 71.5 Democratic Tom Jolicoeur 37,610 28.5 Total votes 132,001 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Assembly District 36 election, 1986[56] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 77,132 73.3 Democratic Frank Nekimken 26,208 24.9 Libertarian H. Bruce Driscoll 1,875 1.8 Total votes 105,215 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Assembly District 36 election, 1988[57] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 101,012 70.0 Democratic George Webb II 39,539 27.4 Libertarian H. Bruce Driscoll 3,782 2.6 Total votes 144,333 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Assembly District 36 Republican primary election, 1990 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 28,740 80.7 Republican Kevin Staker 6,866 19.3 Total votes 35,606 100 Voter turnout % California State Assembly District 36 election, 1990[58] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 66,081 58.6 Democratic Ginny Connell 40,356 35.8 Libertarian David A. Harner 6,371 5.6 Total votes 112,808 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California's 26th Congressional Republican primary election, 1992 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 20,163 34.5 Republican Sang Korman 13,884 23.7 Republican Bill Spillane 10,679 18.3 Republican Jim Salomon 4,382 7.5 Republican Rob Meyer 2,889 4.9 Republican Stephen Weiss 2,238 3.8 Republican Nicholas Hariton 1,805 3.1 Republican Robert Colaco 1,582 2.7 Republican Harry Wachtel 902 1.5 Total votes 58,524 100 Voter turnout % United States House of Representatives elections, 1992[59] Party Candidate Votes % Democratic Anthony C. Beilenson (incumbent) 141,742 55.5 Republican Tom McClintock 99,835 39.1 Peace and Freedom John Paul Linblad 13,690 5.4 Total votes 255,267 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Democratic hold California State Controller Republican primary election, 1994 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 1,112,435 60.8 Republican John Morris 717,681 39.2 Total votes 1,830,116 100 Voter turnout % California State Controller election, 1994[60] Party Candidate Votes % Democratic Kathleen Connell 3,980,731 48.3 Republican Tom McClintock 3,792,997 46.1 Peace and Freedom Elizabeth A. Nakano 182,671 2.2 American Independent Nathan Johnson 152,228 1.8 Libertarian Cullene Lang 128,253 1.6 Total votes 8,236,880 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Democratic hold California State Assembly District 38 Republican primary election, 1996 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 13,999 38.2 Republican Ross Hopkins 7,425 20.3 Republican Bob Larkin 4,774 13.0 Republican Robert Hamlin 4,068 11.1 Republican Stephen Frank 3,308 9.0 Republican Peggy Freeman 3,093 8.4 Total votes 36,667 100 Voter turnout % California State Assembly District 38 election, 1996[61] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 71,596 55.5 Democratic Jon Lauritzen 51,274 39.8 Natural Law Virginia F. Neuman 6,021 4.7 Total votes 128,891 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Assembly District 38 election, 1998[62] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 78,417 100 Total votes 78,417 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Senate District 19 primary election, 2000 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 99,135 52.5 Democratic Daniel Gonzalez 56,739 30.0 Republican Judy Mikels 33,255 17.5 Total votes 189,129 100 Voter turnout % California State Senate District 19 election, 2000[63] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 165,422 57.6 Democratic Daniel Gonzalez 121,893 42.4 Total votes 287,315 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Controller Republican primary election, 2002 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 948,539 45.8 Republican Dean Andal 736,317 35.5 Republican Snow Hume 194,883 9.4 Republican Nancy Beecham 194,583 9.3 Total votes 2,074,322 100 Voter turnout % California State Controller election, 2002[64] Party Candidate Votes % Democratic Steve Westly 3,289,839 45.4 Republican Tom McClintock 3,273,028 45.1 Green Laura Wells 419,873 5.8 Natural Law J. Carlos Aguirre 179,999 2.4 American Independent Ernest Vance 96,019 1.3 Total votes 7,258,758 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Democratic hold For a complete list of all candidates who participated in the 2003 recall election, see California gubernatorial recall election, 2003. California Gubernatorial Recall election, 2003[65] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger 4,206,284 48.6 Democratic Cruz Bustamante 2,724,874 31.5 Republican Tom McClintock 1,161,287 13.5 Green Peter Camejo 242,247 2.8 Independent Arianna Huffington 47,505 0.6 Republican Peter Ueberroth 25,134 0.3 Democratic Larry Flynt 17,458 0.3 Independent Gary Coleman 14,242 0.2 Total votes 8,657,915 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican gain from Democratic California State Senate District 19 election, 2004[66] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 233,365 60.8 Democratic Paul Graber 151,085 39.2 Total votes 384,450 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California State Lieutenant Gubernatorial Republican primary election, 2006 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 1,760,667 93.8 Republican Tony Farmer 117,335 6.2 Total votes 1,878,002 100 Voter turnout % California State Lieutenant Gubernatorial election, 2006[67] Party Candidate Votes % Democratic John Garamendi 4,189,584 49.2 Republican Tom McClintock 3,845,858 45.1 Green Donna J. Warren 239,107 2.8 Libertarian Lynnette Shaw 142,851 1.6 American Independent Jim King 86,446 0.8 Peace and Freedom Stewart A. Alexander 43,319 0.5 Total votes 8,529,165 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Democratic hold California's 4th Congressional District Republican primary election, 2008 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 51,655 53.5 Republican Doug Ose 37,802 39.2 Republican Suzanne Jones 4,920 5.0 Republican Theodore Terbolizard 2,249 2.3 Total votes 96,626 100 Voter turnout % United States House of Representatives elections, 2008[68] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 185,790 50.3 Democratic Charlie Brown 183,990 49.7 Total votes 369,780 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California's 4th Congressional District Republican primary election, 2010 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 89,443 78.5 Republican Michael Babich 24,528 21.5 Total votes 113,971 100 Voter turnout % United States House of Representatives elections, 2010[69] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 186,392 61.3 Democratic Clint Curtis 95,653 31.4 Green Benjamin Emery 22,179 7.3 Total votes 304,224 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold United States House of Representatives elections, 2012[70] Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock 197,803 61.1 Democratic Jack Uppal 125,885 38.9 Total votes 323,688 100 Turnout {{{votes}}} Republican hold California's 4th Congressional district primary election, 2014 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 80,999 56.2 Republican Arthur "Art" Moore 32,855 22.8 Independent Jeffrey Gerlach 30,300 21.0 Total votes 144,154 100 Voter turnout % California's 4th Congressional district election, 2014 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 126,784 60.0 Republican Arthur "Art" Moore 84,350 40.0 Total votes 211,134 100 Voter turnout % California's 4th Congressional district primary election, 2016 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 135,626 61.5 Democratic Robert Derlet 60,574 27.5 Democratic Sean White 24,460 11.1 California's 4th Congressional district election, 2016 Party Candidate Votes % Republican Tom McClintock (incumbent) 220,133 62.7 Democrat Robert W. Derlet 130,845 37.3 Total votes 350,978 100 Voter turnout %


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Statement of Vote (Retrieved on February 1, 2010). ^ Our Campaigns "California Controller Race – November 7, 1994," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ Our Campaigns "California State Assembly 38 Race – November 5, 1996," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ Our Campaigns "California State Assembly 38 Race – November 3, 1998," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ Office of the California Secretary of State Archived 2009-06-12 at the Wayback Machine. "State Senator," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ Office of the California Secretary of State Archived 2009-06-13 at the Wayback Machine. "Controller, by county," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ Office of the California Secretary of State Archived 2009-06-12 at the Wayback Machine. "Governor, by county," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ Office of the California Secretary of State Archived 2009-06-12 at the Wayback Machine. "State Senator," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ Office of the California Secretary of State Archived 2008-07-17 at the Wayback Machine. "Lieutenant Governor, by county," (Retrieved on August 1, 2009). ^ "Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on February 2, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.  ^ "Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on May 20, 2011. Retrieved January 21, 2014.  ^ "Office of the California Secretary of State "United States Representative" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved January 21, 2014. 


External links[edit] Congressman Tom McClintock official U.S. House website Tom McClintock for Congress Tom McClintock at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Statements Video Response to President Calderon Appearances on C-SPAN Biography at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress Profile at Project Vote Smart Financial information (federal office) at the Federal Election Commission Legislation sponsored at the Library of Congress California Assembly Preceded by Chuck Imbrecht Member of the California Assembly from the 36th district 1982–1992 Succeeded by Nao Takasugi Preceded by Paula Boland Member of the California Assembly from the 38th district 1996–2000 Succeeded by Keith Richman California Senate Preceded by Cathie Wright Member of the California Senate from the 19th district 2000–2008 Succeeded by Tony Strickland U.S. House of Representatives Preceded by John Doolittle Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from California's 4th congressional district 2009–present Incumbent Current U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial) Preceded by Ben Ray Luján United States Representatives by seniority 174th Succeeded by Pete Olson v t e California's current delegation to the United States Congress Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Kamala Harris (D) Representatives (ordered by district) Doug LaMalfa (R) Jared Huffman (D) John Garamendi (D) Tom McClintock (R) Mike Thompson (D) Doris Matsui (D) Ami Bera (D) Paul Cook (R) Jerry McNerney (D) Jeff Denham (R) Mark DeSaulnier (D) Nancy Pelosi (D) Barbara Lee (D) Jackie Speier (D) Eric Swalwell (D) Jim Costa (D) Ro Khanna (D) Anna Eshoo (D) Zoe Lofgren (D) Jimmy Panetta (D) David Valadao (R) Devin Nunes (R) Kevin McCarthy (R) Salud Carbajal (D) Steve Knight (R) Julia Brownley (D) Judy Chu (D) Adam Schiff (D) Tony Cárdenas (D) Brad Sherman (D) Pete Aguilar (D) Grace Napolitano (D) Ted Lieu (D) Jimmy Gomez (D) Norma Torres (D) Raul Ruiz (D) Karen Bass (D) Linda Sánchez (D) Ed Royce (R) Lucille Roybal-Allard (D) Mark Takano (D) Ken Calvert (R) Maxine Waters (D) Nanette Barragán (D) Mimi Walters (R) Lou Correa (D) Alan Lowenthal (D) Dana Rohrabacher (R) Darrell Issa (R) Duncan D. Hunter (R) Juan Vargas (D) Scott Peters (D) Susan Davis (D) Other states' delegations Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Non‑voting: American Samoa District of Columbia Guam Northern Mariana Islands Puerto Rico U.S. Virgin Islands v t e Current Members of the United States House of Representatives Presiding Officer: Speaker Paul Ryan (R) Majority party v t e Current Republican Party conference Majority Leader: Kevin McCarthy, Majority Whip: Steve Scalise Other members: Abraham Aderholt Allen Amash Amodei Arrington Babin Bacon Banks Barletta Barr Barton Bergman Biggs Bilirakis M. Bishop R. Bishop Black Blackburn Blum Bost Brady Brat Bridenstine M. Brooks S. Brooks Buchanan Buck Bucshon Budd Burgess Byrne Calvert B. Carter J. Carter Chabot Cheney Coffman Cole C. Collins D. Collins Comer Comstock Conaway Cook Costello Cramer Crawford Culberson Curbelo Curtis Davidson Davis Denham Dent DeSantis DesJarlais Diaz-Balart Donovan Duffy Je. Duncan Ji. Duncan Dunn Emmer Estes Farenthold Faso Ferguson Fitzpatrick Fleischmann Flores Fortenberry Foxx Frelinghuysen Gaetz Gallagher Garrett Gianforte Gibbs Gohmert Goodlatte Gosar Gowdy Granger G. Graves S. Graves T. Graves Griffith Grothman Guthrie Handel Harper Harris Hartzler Hensarling Herrera Beutler Hice Higgins Hill Holding Hollingsworth Hudson Huizenga Hultgren Hunter Hurd Issa E. Jenkins L. Jenkins B. Johnson M. Johnson S. Johnson Jones Jordan Joyce Katko M. Kelly T. Kelly P. King S. King Kinzinger Knight Kustoff Labrador LaHood LaMalfa Lamborn Lance Latta Lewis LoBiondo Long Loudermilk Love Lucas Luetkemeyer MacArthur Marchant Marino Marshall Massie Mast McCaul McClintock McHenry McKinley McMorris Rodgers McSally Meadows Meehan Messer Mitchell Moolenaar Mooney Mullin Newhouse Noem Norman Nunes Olson Palazzo Palmer Paulsen Pearce Perry Pittenger Poe Poliquin Posey Ratcliffe Reed Reichert Renacci Rice Roby Roe H. Rogers M. Rogers Rohrabacher Rokita F. Rooney T. Rooney Ros-Lehtinen Roskam Ross Rothfus Rouzer Royce Russell Rutherford Sanford Schweikert Scott Sensenbrenner Sessions Shimkus Shuster Simpson A. Smith C. Smith J. Smith L. Smith Smucker Stefanik Stewart Stivers Taylor Tenney Thompson Thornberry Tiberi Tipton Trott Turner Upton Valadao Wagner Walberg Walden Walker Walorski Walters Weber Webster Wenstrup Westerman Williams Wilson Wittman Womack Woodall Yoder Yoho Da. Young Do. 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Barbara McClintockUnited States House Of RepresentativesCaliforniaCalifornia's 4th Congressional DistrictIncumbentJohn DoolittleCalifornia SenateCalifornia's 19th State Senate DistrictCathie WrightTony StricklandCalifornia State AssemblyCalifornia's 38th State Assembly DistrictPaula BolandKeith RichmanCalifornia State AssemblyCalifornia's 36th State Assembly DistrictCharles R. ImbrechtNao TakasugiWhite Plains, New YorkRepublican Party (United States)Elk Grove, CaliforniaUniversity Of California, Los AngelesBachelor Of ArtsHelp:IPA/EnglishUnited States House Of RepresentativesCalifornia's 4th Congressional DistrictRepublican Party (United States)California AssemblyCalifornia State SenateGovernor Of California2003 California RecallLieutenant Governor Of CaliforniaCalifornia Lieutenant Gubernatorial Election, 2006White Plains, New YorkUniversity Of California, Los AngelesChairmanVentura County, CaliforniaEdward M. DavisClaremont InstituteElk Grove, CaliforniaCalifornia's 7th Congressional DistrictCalifornia's 36th State Assembly DistrictThousand Oaks, CaliforniaDemocratic Party (United States)California's 38th State Assembly DistrictLethal InjectionDeath Penalty In CaliforniaEdit Section: California Senate (2000–2008)EnlargeCalifornia's 19th State Senate DistrictDot-com BubbleCar TaxGray DavisPerformance-based BudgetingEdit Section: Statewide ElectionsCalifornia State Controller Election, 1994California State ControllerGray DavisKathleen ConnellLos Angeles MayorTom Bradley (American Politician)Housing Authority Of The City Of Los AngelesCalifornia State Controller Election, 2002Steve WestlyEBayScottish AmericanCalifornia Gubernatorial Recall ElectionGray DavisArnold SchwarzeneggerDemocratic Party (United States)Lieutenant Governor Of CaliforniaCruz BustamanteStanislaus County, CaliforniaMariposa County, CaliforniaTuolumne County, CaliforniaTehama County, CaliforniaCalaveras County, CaliforniaMadera County, CaliforniaModoc County, CaliforniaShasta County, CaliforniaSan Joaquin County, CaliforniaVentura County, CaliforniaCalifornia Lieutenant Gubernatorial Election, 2006Lieutenant Governor Of CaliforniaCalifornia Insurance CommissionerJohn GaramendiAnthony C. 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