Contents 1 History 2 Admission 3 Programs 3.1 Pre-College Division 3.2 Music Technology Center 3.3 Juilliard Electric Ensemble 4 Performing ensembles 5 Fundraising 6 Notable people 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links

History[edit] The Juilliard School In 1905, the Institute of Musical Art, Juilliard's predecessor institution, was founded on the premise that the United States did not have a premier music school and too many students were going to Europe to study music.[5] The Institute opened in the former Lenox Mansion, Fifth Avenue and 12th Street, on October 11. It moved in 1910 to 120 Claremont Avenue in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, onto a property purchased from Bloomingdale Insane Asylum.[6] In 1920, the Juilliard Foundation was created, named after textile merchant Augustus D. Juilliard, who bequeathed a substantial amount of money for the advancement of music in the United States. In 1924, the foundation purchased the Vanderbilt family guesthouse at 49 E. 52nd Street, and established the Juilliard Graduate School.[7] In 1926, the Juilliard School of Music was created through a merger of the Institute of Musical Art and the Juilliard Graduate School. The two schools shared a common Board of Directors and President (Columbia University professor John Erskine) but retained their distinct identities. The conductor and music-educator Frank Damrosch continued as the Institute's dean, and the Australian pianist and composer Ernest Hutcheson was appointed dean of the Graduate School. In 1937, Hutcheson succeeded Erskine as president of the two institutions, a job he held until 1945. In 1946, the Institute of Musical Art and the Juilliard Graduate School completely merged to form a single institution. The president of the school at that time was William Schuman, the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Schuman established the Juilliard String Quartet in 1946 and the Dance Division in 1951, under the direction of Martha Hill. William Schuman graduated from Columbia's Teachers College (BS 1935, MA 1937) and attended the Juilliard Summer School in 1932, 1933 and 1936. While attending Juilliard Summer School, he developed a personal dislike for traditional music theory and ear training curricula, finding little value in counterpoint and dictation. Soon after being appointed as president of the Juilliard School of Music in 1945, William Schuman created a new curriculum called the Literature and Materials of Music (L&M), designed for composers to teach. L&M was Schuman's reaction against more formal theory and ear training, and as a result did not have a formal structure. The general mandate was "to give the student an awareness of the dynamic nature of the materials of music." The quality and degree of each student's education in harmony, music history, or ear training was dependent on how each composer-teacher decided to interpret this mandate. William Schuman resigned as president of Juilliard after being elected president of Lincoln Center in 1962. Peter Mennin, another composer with directorial experience at the Peabody Conservatory, was elected as his successor. Mennin made significant changes to the L&M program—ending ear training and music history and hiring the well known pedagogue Renée Longy to teach solfège. In 1968, Mennin hired John Houseman to manage a new Drama Division, and in 1969 oversaw Juilliard's relocation from Claremont Avenue to Lincoln Center. The School's name was changed to The Juilliard School to reflect its broadened mission to educate musicians, directors, and actors.[8][9] Dr. Joseph W. Polisi became president of Juilliard in 1984, after Peter Mennin died. Polisi's many accomplishments include philanthropic successes, broadening of the curriculum and establishment of dormitories for Juilliard's students. In 2001, the school established a jazz performance training program. In September 2005, Colin Davis conducted an orchestra that combined students from the Juilliard and London's Royal Academy of Music at the BBC Proms, and during 2008 the Juilliard Orchestra embarked on a successful tour of China, performing concerts as part of the Cultural Olympiad in Beijing, Suzhou, and Shanghai under the expert leadership of Maestro Xian Zhang. In 1999, the Juilliard School was awarded the National Medal of Arts.[10] In 2006, Juilliard received a trove of precious music manuscripts from board chair and philanthropist Bruce Kovner. The collection includes autograph scores, sketches, composer-emended proofs and first editions of major works by Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Chopin, Schubert, Liszt, Ravel, Stravinsky, Copland, and other masters of the classical music canon. Many of the manuscripts had been unavailable for generations. Among the items are the printer's manuscript of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, complete with Beethoven's handwritten amendments, that was used for the first performance in Vienna in 1824; Mozart's autograph of the wind parts of the final scene of The Marriage of Figaro; Beethoven's arrangement of his monumental Große Fuge for piano four hands; Schumann's working draft of his Symphony No. 2; and manuscripts of Brahms's Symphony No. 2 and Piano Concerto No. 2. The entire collection has since been digitized and can be viewed online.[11] In 2010 philanthropist James S. Marcus donated 10 million dollars to the school to establish the Ellen and James S. Marcus Institute for Vocal Arts at the school.[12] On September 28, 2015, The Juilliard School announced a major expansion into Tianjin during a visit by China's first lady, Peng Liyuan, the institution's first such full-scale foray outside the United States, with plans to offer a master's degree program.[13] In May 2017, retired New York City Ballet principal dancer Damian Woetzel was named President, replacing Joseph W. Polisi.[14]

Admission[edit] Admittance into The Juilliard School is highly competitive. In 2007, the school received 2,138 applications for admission, of which 162 were admitted for a 7.6% acceptance rate.[15] For the fall semester of 2009, the school had an 8.0% acceptance rate.[16] In 2011, the school accepted 5.5% of applicants.[17] For Fall 2012, 2,657 undergraduate applicants were received by the college division and 7.2% were accepted. Juilliard admits both degree program seekers and pre-college division.[18] All applicants who wish to enroll in the Music Advancement Program, for the Pre-College Division, must perform an audition in person before members of the faculty and administration and must be between ages 8 and 14. Before being scheduled for an audition, each applicant must submit a complete application for admission. After auditions, the school invites select applicants to meet with a program administrator. The 75th percentile accepted into Juilliard in 2012 had a GPA of 3.96 and an SAT score of 1970.[19]

Programs[edit] The school offers courses in dance, drama and music. The Dance Division was established in 1951 by William Schuman with Martha Hill as its director. It offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts or a Diploma.[20] The Drama Division was established in 1968 by the actor John Houseman and Michel Saint-Denis. Its acting programs offer a Bachelor of Fine Arts, a Diploma and, beginning Fall 2012, a Master of Fine Arts.[21] Until 2006, when James Houghton became Director of the Drama Division, there was a "cut system" that would remove up to one-third of the second-year class. The Lila Acheson Wallace American Playwrights Program, begun in 1993, offers one-year, tuition-free, graduate fellowships; selected students may be offered a second-year extension and receive an Artist Diploma. The Andrew W. Mellon Artist Diploma Program for Theatre Directors was a two-year graduate fellowship that began in 1995 (expanded to three years in 1997) this was discontinued from autumn 2006. The Music Division is the largest of the school's divisions. Available degrees are Bachelor of Music or Diploma, Master of Music or Graduate Diploma, Artist Diploma and Doctor of Musical Arts. Academic majors are brass, collaborative piano, composition, guitar, harp, historical performance, jazz studies, orchestral conducting, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice, and woodwinds. The collaborative piano, historical performance, and orchestral conducting programs are solely at the graduate level; the opera studies and music performance subprograms only offer Artist Diplomas. The Juilliard Vocal Arts department now incorporates the former Juilliard Opera Center. All Bachelor and Master courses require credits from the Liberal Arts course; Joseph W. Polisi is a member of the Liberal Arts faculty.[22] Pre-College Division[edit] The Pre-College Division teaches students enrolled in elementary, junior high, and high school. The Pre-College Division is conducted every Saturday from September to May in the Juilliard Building at Lincoln Center.[23] All students study solfège and music theory in addition to their primary instrument. Vocal majors also must study diction and performance. Similarly, pianists must study piano performance. String, brass and woodwind players as well as percussionists also participate with orchestra. The pre-college has two orchestras, the Pre-College Symphony (PCS) and the Pre-College Orchestra (PCO). Placement is by age and students may elect to study conducting, chorus and chamber music. The Pre-College Division began as the Preparatory Centers (later the Preparatory Division), part of the Institute of Musical Art since 1916. The Pre-College Division was established in 1969 with Katherine McC. Ellis as its first director. Olegna Fuschi served as director from 1975 to 1988. The Fuschi/Mennin partnership allowed the Pre-College Division to thrive, affording its graduates training at the highest artistic level (with many of the same teachers as the college division), as well as their own commencement ceremony and diplomas. In addition to Fuschi, directors of Juilliard's Pre-College Division have included composer Dr. Andrew Thomas. The current director of the Pre-College Division is Yoheved Kaplinsky. Music Technology Center[edit] The Music Technology Center at the Juilliard School was created in 1993 to provide students with the opportunity to use digital technology in the creation and performance of new music. Since then, the program has expanded to include a wide offering of classes such as, Introduction to Music Technology, Music Production, Film Scoring, Computers In Performance and an Independent Study In Composition.[24] In 2009, the Music Technology Center moved to a new, state of the art facility that includes a mix and record suite and a digital "playroom" for composing and rehearsing with technology. Together with the Willson Theater, the Music Technology Center is the home of interdisciplinary and electro-acoustic projects and performances at the Juilliard School. Juilliard Electric Ensemble[edit] The Juilliard Electric Ensemble was created in 2003 to provide students from all three of Juilliard’s divisions (dance, drama, and music) with an opportunity to use new technology in the creation and performance of interactive and multi-disciplinary work. In past performances, the Juilliard Electric Ensemble has used interactive technology to expand the range of their instruments, control audio and visual elements with electronic tools, shape video and projection design in real-time by moving through a virtual field, and interact with artists and computers around the world via the web. Since its debut, the Electric Ensemble has performed works by over 50 composers including Joan La Barbara, Kenji Bunch, Eric Chasalow, Sebastian Currier, Avner Dorman, Jonathan Harvey, Jocelyn Pook, Steve Reich, Daniel Bernard Roumain, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Morton Subotnick, Alejandro Viñao, Jacob ter Veldhuis, David Wallace, Mark Wood, and Peter Wyer.

Performing ensembles[edit] Morse Hall, one of the performing spaces inside the Juilliard School The Juilliard School has a variety of ensembles, including chamber music, jazz, orchestras, and vocal/choral groups. Juilliard's orchestras include the Juilliard Orchestra, the New Juilliard Ensemble, the Juilliard Theatre Orchestra, and the Conductors' Orchestra. The Axiom Ensemble is a student directed and managed group dedicated to well-known 20th century works. In addition, several ensembles of Juilliard Faculty, called Resident Ensembles, perform frequently at the school. These groups include the Juilliard String Quartet, the American Brass Quintet, the New York Woodwind Quintet, and Juilliard Baroque.

Fundraising[edit] The Juilliard Second Century Fund aims to raise $300 million to enable the Juilliard School to sustain its eminence in performing arts education well into the school’s next century.[25] The tuition expected for 2011 is about $48,670 for the school year. Expanded and renamed on Juilliard’s 100th anniversary, the fund supports six components that help Juilliard continue to recruit the world’s best young artists and faculty, offer educational programs that maintain the quality of a Juilliard education, and increase the size and functionality of Juilliard's physical plant. Fundraising specifically targeted to the Pre-College Division began during 2004 with a benefit concert given by the Park Avenue Chamber Symphony. The event raised $90,000 to establish a Pre-College Parents' Association Scholarship Fund. During 2005, Juilliard produced its own benefit concert for the Pre-College Division featuring its own students directed by faculty member Itzhak Perlman and hosted by entertainer Bill Cosby to add to this fund. In April 2009, it was announced that the Music Advancement Program (MAP) would be curtailed due to budget reductions. After strong opposition to the reductions, the program, which helps inner-city children get music lessons, was then reinstated after several donors pledged money to support it.

Notable people[edit] Main article: List of Juilliard School people For a list of notable faculty, see List of Juilliard School people § Notable teachers. For a list of notable alumni, see List of Juilliard School people § Notable alumni.

References[edit] ^ "Still 'best reputation' for Juilliard at 100". The Washington Times. Retrieved September 15, 2013.  ^ Frank Rich (2003). Juilliard. Harry N. Abrams. p. 10. ISBN 0810935368. Juilliard grew up with both the country and its burgeoning cultural capital of New York to become an internationally recognized synonym for the pinnacle of artistic achievement.  ^ "The Top 25 Drama Schools in the World". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 15, 2013.  ^ "QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016 - Performing Arts". Top Universities. QS Quacquarelli Symonds. Retrieved 14 September 2016.  ^ "About Juilliard: A Brief History". The Juilliard School. January 4, 2009. Retrieved March 25, 2010.  ^ "Historical Significance". Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved October 21, 2014.  ^ Jeni Dahmus (March 2010). "Time Capsule". The Juilliard Journal Online. Retrieved March 25, 2010.  ^ A Brief History, The Juilliard School. Retrieved June 13, 2010. ^ Juilliard School, The, The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. 2007, Columbia University Press, found in Infoplease. Retrieved June 13, 2010. ^ "Lifetime Honors: National Medal of Arts". National Endowment for the Arts. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved March 25, 2010.  ^ "Juilliard Manuscript Collection".  ^ Fred Plotkin (July 7, 2015). "Remembering James S. Marcus". WQXR Online.  ^ Michael Cooper (September 28, 2015). "Juilliard's China Plans Move Forward". The New York Times. Retrieved February 3, 2016.  ^ "Juilliard Names Damian Woetzel as Its New President". The New York Times. 10 May 2017. Retrieved 10 May 2017.  ^ "The Juilliard School, New York". Retrieved May 9, 2010.  ^ "Juilliard School". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 2010-12-16.  ^ Finnegan, Leah (March 30, 2011). "College Admissions Rates Drop For The Class Of 2015". The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on March 27, 2014. Retrieved April 23, 2011.  ^ "About Juilliard". The Juilliard School. Retrieved November 25, 2012.  ^ "Juilliard school". Retrieved November 25, 2012.  ^ "Dance". The Juilliard School. Retrieved September 7, 2016.  ^ "Drama". The Juilliard School. Retrieved September 7, 2016.  ^ "Liberal Arts". The Juilliard School. Retrieved September 7, 2016.  ^ "Juilliard Pre-College". The Juilliard School. Retrieved September 7, 2016.  ^ "Center for Innovation in the Arts". The Juilliard School. Retrieved September 7, 2016.  ^ Lisa Robinson (February 2008). "New Gifts—and New Venue Names—for Juilliard". The Juilliard Journal Online. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 

Further reading[edit] Ten Years of American Opera Design at the Juilliard School of Music, published by New York Public Library, 1941. The Juilliard Report on Teaching the Literature and Materials of Music, by Juilliard School of Music. Published by Norton, 1953. The Juilliard Review, by Richard Franko Goldman, published by Juilliard School of Music, 1954. The Juilliard Journal, published by the Juilliard School, 1985. Nothing But the Best: The Struggle for Perfection at the Juilliard School, by Judith Kogan. Published by Random House, 1987. ISBN 0-394-55514-7. Guide to the Juilliard School Archives, by Juilliard School Archives, Jane Gottlieb, Stephen E. Novak, Taras Pavlovsky. Published by The School, 1992. Juilliard: A History, by Andrea Olmstead. Published by University of Illinois Press, 2002, ISBN 0-252-07106-9. A Living Legacy: Historic Stringed Instruments at the Juilliard School, by Lisa Brooks Robinson, Itzhak Perlman. Amadeus Press, 2006. ISBN 1-57467-146-4.

External links[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Juilliard School. Official website The Juilliard School – its history at 100 Andrea Olmstead papers, 1970-2013 Music Division, The New York Public Library. Olmstead's papers hold the research she carried out for her book on Juilliard, and include recorded interviews with various faculty, former students, and staff. v t e Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts Venues Alice Tully Hall Damrosch Park David Geffen Hall David H. Koch Theater Rose Hall Metropolitan Opera House Vivian Beaumont Theater Walter Reade Theater Resident companies Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Film Society of Lincoln Center Jazz at Lincoln Center Juilliard School Lincoln Center Theater Metropolitan Opera New York City Ballet New York City Opera New York Philharmonic New York Public Library for the Performing Arts School of American Ballet New York City portal Dance portal Coordinates: 40°46′26″N 73°58′59″W / 40.773871°N 73.983178°W / 40.773871; -73.983178 Retrieved from "" Categories: Juilliard School1905 establishments in New York (state)Dance schools in the United StatesDiller Scofidio + Renfro buildingsDrama schools in the United StatesEducational institutions established in 1905Lincoln CenterMusic schools in New York CityUnited States National Medal of Arts recipientsUniversities and colleges in ManhattanDance in New York CityHidden categories: Use mdy dates from July 2011Coordinates on Wikidata

Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog in Namespaces ArticleTalk Variants Views ReadEditView history More Search Navigation Main pageContentsFeatured contentCurrent eventsRandom articleDonate to WikipediaWikipedia store Interaction HelpAbout WikipediaCommunity portalRecent changesContact page Tools What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationWikidata itemCite this page Print/export Create a bookDownload as PDFPrintable version In other projects Wikimedia Commons Languages العربيةAzərbaycancaБеларускаяБългарскиCatalàČeštinaDanskDeutschEestiEspañolEsperantoفارسیFrançais한국어Bahasa IndonesiaItalianoעבריתქართულიЛезгиLatinaNederlands日本語NorskOccitanPolskiPortuguêsРусскийSuomiSvenskaУкраїнська中文 Edit links This page was last edited on 2 January 2018, at 22:56. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Contact Wikipedia Developers Cookie statement Mobile view (window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgPageParseReport":{"limitreport":{"cputime":"0.448","walltime":"0.540","ppvisitednodes":{"value":4104,"limit":1000000},"ppgeneratednodes":{"value":0,"limit":1500000},"postexpandincludesize":{"value":54666,"limit":2097152},"templateargumentsize":{"value":2673,"limit":2097152},"expansiondepth":{"value":15,"limit":40},"expensivefunctioncount":{"value":2,"limit":500},"unstrip-depth":{"value":0,"limit":20},"unstrip-size":{"value":23598,"limit":5000000},"entityaccesscount":{"value":1,"limit":400},"timingprofile":["100.00% 483.705 1 -total"," 32.78% 158.540 1 Template:Reflist"," 29.65% 143.402 1 Template:Infobox_school"," 22.64% 109.532 1 Template:Infobox"," 18.91% 91.457 18 Template:Cite_web"," 10.08% 48.746 55 Template:If_empty"," 6.39% 30.890 3 Template:ISBN"," 5.40% 26.135 1 Template:Commons_category"," 4.92% 23.821 1 Template:IPAc-en"," 4.63% 22.400 1 Template:Redirect"]},"scribunto":{"limitreport-timeusage":{"value":"0.213","limit":"10.000"},"limitreport-memusage":{"value":6296849,"limit":52428800}},"cachereport":{"origin":"mw1244","timestamp":"20180313004331","ttl":1900800,"transientcontent":false}}});});(window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgBackendResponseTime":106,"wgHostname":"mw1320"});});

The_Juilliard_School - Photos and All Basic Informations

The_Juilliard_School More Links

Juilliard (disambiguation)New York CityJoseph W. PolisiEnlargeAlice Tully HallHelp:IPA/EnglishLincoln Center For The Performing ArtsUpper West SideManhattanNew York CityPerforming ArtsMusic SchoolDanceDramaMusicQuacquarelli SymondsEnlargeFifth AvenueClaremont AvenueMorningside HeightsBloomingdale Insane AsylumAugustus D. JuilliardVanderbilt Family52nd Street (Manhattan)Columbia UniversityJohn Erskine (educator)Frank DamroschErnest HutchesonWilliam SchumanPulitzer Prize For MusicJuilliard String QuartetMartha HillTeachers College, Columbia UniversityPeter MenninPeabody ConservatorySolfègeJohn HousemanJoseph W. PolisiJazzColin DavisRoyal Academy Of MusicThe PromsOlympiadSuzhouXian ZhangNational Medal Of ArtsBruce KovnerWolfgang Amadeus MozartJohann Sebastian BachLudwig Van BeethovenJohannes BrahmsRobert SchumannFrédéric ChopinFranz SchubertFranz LisztMaurice RavelIgor StravinskyAaron CoplandSymphony No. 9 (Beethoven)ViennaThe Marriage Of FigaroGroße FugeSymphony No. 2 (Schumann)Symphony No. 2 (Brahms)Piano Concerto No. 2 (Brahms)James S. MarcusTianjinPeng LiyuanMaster's DegreeNew York City BalletDamian WoetzelJoseph W. PolisiBachelor Of Fine ArtsJohn HousemanMichel Saint-DenisMaster Of Fine ArtsLila Bell WallaceAndrew W. MellonBachelor Of MusicMaster Of MusicGraduate DiplomaDoctor Of Musical ArtsAcademic MajorJunior HighSolfègeMusic TheoryAndrew Thomas (composer)Digital TechnologyDanceDramaMusicJoan La BarbaraKenji BunchEric ChasalowSebastian CurrierAvner DormanJonathan Harvey (composer)Jocelyn PookSteve ReichDaniel Bernard RoumainKarlheinz StockhausenMorton SubotnickAlejandro ViñaoJacob Ter VeldhuisDavid Wallace (composer)EnlargeChamber MusicJazzChoirJuilliard String QuartetAmerican Brass QuintetNew York Woodwind QuintetPark Avenue Chamber SymphonyItzhak PerlmanBill CosbyList Of Juilliard School PeopleList Of Juilliard School PeopleList Of Juilliard School PeopleThe Washington TimesInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0810935368The Hollywood ReporterNational Endowment For The ArtsWQXR-FMU.S. News & World ReportThe Huffington PostInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0-394-55514-7International Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0-252-07106-9International Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/1-57467-146-4Template:Lincoln CenterTemplate Talk:Lincoln CenterLincoln Center For The Performing ArtsAlice Tully HallDamrosch ParkDavid Geffen HallDavid H. Koch TheaterJazz At Lincoln CenterMetropolitan Opera House (Lincoln Center)Vivian Beaumont TheaterWalter Reade TheaterChamber Music Society Of Lincoln CenterFilm Society Of Lincoln CenterJazz At Lincoln CenterVivian Beaumont TheaterMetropolitan OperaNew York City BalletNew York City OperaNew York PhilharmonicNew York Public Library For The Performing ArtsSchool Of American BalletPortal:New York CityPortal:DanceGeographic Coordinate SystemHelp:CategoryCategory:Juilliard SchoolCategory:1905 Establishments In New York (state)Category:Dance Schools In The United StatesCategory:Diller Scofidio + Renfro BuildingsCategory:Drama Schools In The United StatesCategory:Educational Institutions Established In 1905Category:Lincoln CenterCategory:Music Schools In New York CityCategory:United States National Medal Of Arts RecipientsCategory:Universities And Colleges In ManhattanCategory:Dance In New York CityCategory:Use Mdy Dates From July 2011Category:Coordinates On WikidataDiscussion About Edits From This IP Address [n]A List Of Edits Made From This IP Address [y]View The Content Page [c]Discussion About The Content Page [t]Edit This Page [e]Visit The Main Page [z]Guides To Browsing WikipediaFeatured Content – The Best Of WikipediaFind Background Information On Current EventsLoad A Random Article [x]Guidance On How To Use And Edit WikipediaFind Out About WikipediaAbout The Project, What You Can Do, Where To Find ThingsA List Of Recent Changes In The Wiki [r]List Of All English Wikipedia Pages Containing Links To This Page [j]Recent Changes In Pages Linked From This Page [k]Upload Files [u]A List Of All Special Pages [q]Wikipedia:AboutWikipedia:General Disclaimer

view link view link view link view link view link