Contents 1 History 2 Etymology 3 Geography 3.1 Climate 3.2 Ocean, bays, rivers and streams 3.2.1 Russian River 3.2.2 Laguna de Santa Rosa 3.2.3 Other water bodies 3.3 Marine protected areas of Sonoma County 3.4 Threatened/endangered species 3.5 Adjacent counties 3.6 National protected area 4 Transportation 4.1 Major highways 4.2 Public transportation 4.3 Airports 4.4 Railroads 5 Crime 5.1 Cities by population and crime rates 6 Demographics 6.1 2011 6.1.1 Places by population, race, and income 6.2 2010 6.3 2000 7 Metropolitan Statistical Area 8 Government 8.1 State and federal representation 8.2 Law enforcement 9 Economy 10 Politics 10.1 Voter registration statistics 10.1.1 Cities by population and voter registration 11 Education 11.1 Higher education 11.2 Library system 12 Museums 13 Places of interest 14 Populated places 14.1 Incorporated 14.2 Unincorporated 14.2.1 Census-designated places 14.2.2 Other unincorporated places 14.3 Population ranking 15 In popular culture 16 See also 17 Notes 18 References 19 Further reading 20 External links


History[edit] The Pomo, Coast Miwok and Wappo peoples were the earliest human settlers of Sonoma County, between 8000 and 5000 BC, effectively living within the natural carrying capacity of the land. Archaeological evidence of these First people includes a number of occurrences of rock carvings, especially in southern Sonoma County; these carvings often take the form of Pecked curvilinear nucleated design. Spaniards, Russians, and other Europeans claimed and settled in the county from the late 16th to mid-19th century, seeking timber, fur, and farmland.[citation needed] The Russians were the first newcomers to establish a permanent foothold in Sonoma County, with the Russian-American Company establishing Fort Ross on the Sonoma Coast in 1812. This settlement and its outlying Russian settlements came to include a population of several hundred Russian and Aleut settlers and a stockaded fort with artillery. However, the Russians abandoned it in 1841 and sold the fort to John Sutter, settler and Mexican land grantee of Sacramento.[citation needed] Fort Ross was established by the Russians in 1812. The Mission San Francisco Solano, founded in 1823 as the last and northernmost of 21 California missions, is in the present City of Sonoma, at the northern end of El Camino Real. El Presidio de Sonoma, or Sonoma Barracks (part of Spain's Fourth Military District), was established in 1836 by Comandante General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo. His duties included keeping an eye on the Russian traders at Fort Ross, secularizing the Mission, maintaining cooperation with the Native Americans of the entire region, and doling out the lands for large estates and ranches. The City of Sonoma was the site of the Bear Flag Revolt in 1846.[citation needed] Sonoma was one of the original counties formed when California became a state in 1850,[9] with its county seat originally the town of Sonoma. However, by the early 1850s, Sonoma had declined in importance in both commerce and population, its county buildings were crumbling, and it was relatively remote. As a result, elements in the newer, rapidly growing towns of Petaluma, Santa Rosa, and Healdsburg began vying to move the county seat to their towns. The dispute ultimately was between the bigger, richer commercial town of Petaluma and the more centrally located, growing agricultural center of Santa Rosa. The fate was decided following an election for the state legislature in which James Bennett of Santa Rosa defeated Joseph Hooker of Sonoma and introduced a bill that resulted in Santa Rosa being confirmed as county seat in 1854.[10] Allegedly, several Santa Rosans, not caring to wait, decided to take action and, one night, rode down the Sonoma Valley to Sonoma, took the county seals and records, and brought them to Santa Rosa.[11] Some of the county's land was annexed from Mendocino County between 1850 and 1860. Early post-1847 settlement and development focused primarily on the city of Sonoma, then the region's sole town and a common transit and resting point in overland travel between the region and Sacramento and the gold fields to the east. However, after 1850, a settlement that soon became the city of Petaluma began to grow naturally near the farthest navigable point inland up the Petaluma River. Originally a hunting camp used to obtain game to sell in other markets, by 1854 Petaluma had grown into a bustling center of trade, taking advantage of its position in the river near a region of highly productive agricultural land that was being settled. Soon, other inland towns, notably Santa Rosa and Healdsburg began to develop similarly due to their locations along riparian areas in prime agricultural flatland. However, their development initially lagged behind Petaluma which, until the arrival of railroads in the 1860s, remained the primary commercial, transit, and break-of-bulk point for people and goods in the region. After the arrival of the San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad in 1870, Santa Rosa began to boom, soon equalling and then surpassing Petaluma as the region's population and commercial center. The railroad bypassed Petaluma for southern connections to ferries of San Francisco Bay.[citation needed] Six nations have claimed Sonoma County from 1542 to the present:[citation needed] Spanish Empire, 1542, by sea, voyage of Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo as far as the Russian River. Later validated by voyage of Sebastián Vizcaíno, 1602. Kingdom of England, June 1579, voyage of the Golden Hind under Captain Francis Drake at Bodega Bay (exact location disputed). Spanish Empire, October 1775, the Sonora at Bodega Bay, under Lt. Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra, until 1821, when Mexico gained independence from Spain. Russian Empire, by Russian-American Company expedition led by Ivan Alexandrovich Kuskov, the founder of Fort Ross and, from 1812 to 1821, its colonial administrator. Note: There is an overlap of rule with the Mexican Empire (next item), until the Russians sold Fort Ross in 1841 to John Sutter, before leaving the area in 1842. First Mexican Empire, August 1821, under Emperor Agustin Iturbide (October 1822, probable time new flag raised in California), until 1823. Mexican Republic, 1823 until June 1846. California Republic, 14 June 1846 until 9 July 1846. United States of America, 9 July 1846 to present. Sonoma County was severely shaken by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The displacements along the fault averaged 15 feet (4.6 m).[12] In October 2017, the area was badly affected by wildfire.[13]


Etymology[edit] Pomo girl c. 1924, by Edward S. Curtis' from The North American Indian volume 14. According to the book California Place Names, "The name of the Indian tribe is mentioned in baptismal records of 1815 as Chucuines o Sonomas, by Chamisso in 1816 as Sonomi, and repeatedly in Mission records of the following years."[14] According to the Coast Miwok and the Pomo tribes that lived in the region, Sonoma translates as "valley of the moon" or "many moons". Their legends detail this as a land where the moon nestled, hence the names Sonoma Valley and the "Valley of the Moon."[15] This translation was first recorded in an 1850 report by General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo to the California Legislature.[16] Jack London popularized it in his 1913 novel The Valley of the Moon. In the native languages there is also a constantly recurring ending tso-noma, from tso, the earth; and noma, village; hence tsonoma, "earth village."[17] Other sources say Sonoma comes from the Patwin tribes west of the Sacramento River, and their Wintu word for "nose". Per California Place Names, "the name is doubtless derived from a Patwin word for 'nose', which Padre Arroyo (Vocabularies, p. 22) gives as sonom (Suisun)." Spaniards may have found an Indian chief with a prominent protuberance and applied the nickname of Chief Nose to the village and the territory.[18] The name may have applied originally to a nose-shaped geographic feature.[14]


Geography[edit] Hood Mountain with vineyards in foreground. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 1,768 square miles (4,580 km2), of which 1,576 square miles (4,080 km2) is land and 192 square miles (500 km2) (10.9%) is water.[19] The county lies in the North Coast Ranges of northwestern California. Its ranges include the Mayacamas and the Sonoma Mountains, the southern peak of the latter being the prominent landform Sears Point. The highest peak in the Mayacamas within the county is Mt. Saint Helena. It has uncommon occurrences of pygmy forest, dominated by Mendocino cypress. The highest peak of the Sonoma Mountains is Sonoma Mountain itself, which boasts two significant public access properties: Jack London State Historic Park and Fairfield Osborn Preserve. The county includes the City of Sonoma and the Sonoma Valley, in which the City of Sonoma is located. However, these are not synonymous. The City of Sonoma is merely one of several incorporated cities in the county. The Sonoma Valley itself makes up only the southeastern portion of the county, which includes many other valleys and geographic zones. Moreover, the Sonoma Valley itself includes not only the City of Sonoma, but a portion of the City of Santa Rosa and the unincorporated communities of Kenwood, Agua Caliente, Boyes Hot Springs, and Fetters Hot Springs. Other regions of the county beyond the Sonoma Valley include, among others, the Petaluma Valley, the Santa Rosa Plains, the Russian River, the Alexander Valley, and the Dry Creek Valley. Distinct habitat areas within the county include oak woodland, redwood forest, northern coastal scrub, grassland, marshland, oak savanna and riparian woodland. The California oak woodland in the upper Yulupa Creek and Spring Creek watersheds in Annadel State Park is a relatively undisturbed ecosystem with considerable biodiversity. These forested areas have been characterized as some of the best examples of such woodlands.[20] An unusual characteristic of these forests is the high content of undisturbed prehistoric bunchgrass understory, testifying to the absence of historic grazing or other agriculture. Trees of the oak woodland habitat include Pacific madrone, Douglas fir, coast live oak, Garry oak and California laurel. Common understory plants are toyon, poison oak, and, at the fringes, coast silk-tassel. Climate[edit] Sonoma County's Dry Creek Valley Sonoma County, as is often the case with coastal counties in California, has a great degree of climatic variation and numerous, often very different, microclimates.[21][22] Key determining factors for local climate are proximity to the ocean, elevation, and the presence and elevation of hills or mountains to the east and west. This is in large part due to the fact that, as throughout California, the prevailing weather systems and wind come normally from the Pacific Ocean, blowing in from the west and southwest so that places closer to the ocean and on the windward side of higher elevations tend to receive more rain from autumn through spring and more summer wind and fog. This itself is partly a result of the presence of high and low pressures in inland California, with persistent high summer temperatures in the Central Valley, in particular, leading to low pressures, drawing in moist air from the Pacific, cooling into damp cool breezes and fog over the cold coastal water. Those places further inland and particularly in the lee of significant elevations tend to receive less rain and less, in some cases no, fog in the summer. The coast itself is typically cool and moist throughout summer, often foggy, with fog generally blowing in during the late afternoon and evening until it clears in the later morning to be sunny, before repeating. Coastal summer highs are typically in the mid to high 60s, warming to the low 70s further from the ocean. Certain inland areas, including the Petaluma area and the Santa Rosa Plain, are also prone to this normal fog pattern in general.[22] However, they tend to receive the fog later in the evening, the fog tends to be more short-lived, and mid-day temperatures are significantly higher than they are on the coast, typically in the low 80s F. This is particularly true for Petaluma, Cotati and Rohnert Park, and, only slightly less so, Santa Rosa, Windsor, and Sebastopol. In large part this results from lower elevations and the prominent Petaluma Gap in the hills between the ocean to the west and the Petaluma Valley and Santa Rosa Plain to the east. Areas north of Santa Rosa and Windsor, with larger elevations to the west and further from the fog path, tend to receive less fog and less summer marine influence. Healdsburg to the north of Windsor is less foggy and much warmer, with summer highs typically in the higher 80s to about 90 °F (32 °C). Sonoma and the Sonoma Valley, east of Petaluma, are similar, with highs typically in the very high 70s F to 80 °F (27 °C). This is in part due to the presence of the Sonoma Mountains between Petaluma and Sonoma. Cloverdale far to the north out of the Santa Rosa Plain, is significantly hotter than any other city in the county, with rare evening-morning fog and highs often in the 90s, reaching 100 °F (38 °C) much more frequently than the other cities. Notably, however, the temperature differences among the different areas of the county are greatest for the highs during mid-day, with the diurnal lows much more even throughout the entire county. The lows are closely tied to the evening-morning cooling marine influence, in addition to elevation, bringing similarly cool temperatures to much of region. These weather patterns contribute to high diurnal temperature fluctuations in much of the county. In summer, daily lows and highs are typically 30-40 °F apart in land, with highs for Petaluma, Cotati, Rohnert Park, Santa Rosa, Windsor, and Sebastopol typically being in the very low 80s F and lows at or near 50 °F (10 °C). Healdsburg and Sonoma, with similar lows, have even greater diurnal fluctuations due to their significantly warmer highs. On the other hand, the coast, with strong marine influence, tends to have low diurnal temperature fluctuation, with summer highs much cooler than the inland towns, typically 65-75 °F, yet lows in the high 40s to low 50s F, fairly comparable to most inland towns. These microclimates are evident during the rainy seasons as well, with great variation in the amount of rainfall throughout the county. Generally, all of Sonoma County receives a fair amount of rain, with much of the county receiving between about 25 in (640 mm), comparable to areas such as Sonoma and Petaluma, and roughly 30 in (760 mm) normal for Santa Rosa. However, certain areas, particularly in the north-west portion of the county around the Russian River, receive significantly more rainfall. The Guerneville area, for example, typically receives about 50 in (1,300 mm) of rain a year, with annual rain occasionally going as high as 70 in (1,800 mm). Nearby Cazadero typically receives about 72 in (1,800 mm) of rain a year, many times has reached over 100 in (2,500 mm) a year, and sometimes over 120 in (3,000 mm) of rain a year. The Cazadero region is the second wettest place in California after Gasquet.[23] Snow is exceedingly rare in Sonoma County except in the higher elevations on and around the Mayacamas Mountains, particularly Mount Saint Helena, and Cobb Mountain whose peak is across the line of Lake County.[24] Ocean, bays, rivers and streams[edit] Goat Rock Beach as viewed from the Jenner Cliffs looking south, showing the mouth of the Russian River at the Pacific Ocean. Sonoma County is bounded on the west by the Pacific Ocean, and has 76 miles (122 km) of coastline. The major coastal hydrographic features are Bodega Bay, the mouth of the Russian River, and the mouth of the Gualala River, at the border with Mendocino County. All of the county's beaches were listed as the cleanest in the state in 2010.[25] Six of the county's nine cities, from Healdsburg south through Santa Rosa to Rohnert Park and Cotati, are in the Santa Rosa Plain. The northern Plain drains to the Russian River, or a tributary; the southern Plain drains to the Russian River via the Laguna de Santa Rosa. Russian River[edit] Much of central and northern Sonoma County is in the watershed of the Russian River and its tributaries. The river rises in the coastal mountains of Mendocino County, north of the city of Ukiah, and flows into Lake Mendocino, a major flood control reservoir. The Russian flows south from the lake through Mendocino to Sonoma County, paralleled by Highway 101. It turns west at Healdsburg, receiving water from Lake Sonoma via Dry Creek, and empties into the Pacific Ocean at Jenner. Laguna de Santa Rosa[edit] The Laguna de Santa Rosa is the largest tributary of the Russian River.[26] It is 14 miles (23 km) long, running north from Cotati to the Russian River near Forestville. Its flood plain is more than 7,500 acres (30 km2). It drains a 254-square-mile (660 km2) watershed, including most of the Santa Rosa Plain. The Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation says:[27] The Laguna de Santa Rosa is Sonoma County's richest area of wildlife habitat, and the most biologically diverse region of Sonoma County (itself the second-most biologically diverse county in California)... It is a unique ecological system covering more than 30,000 acres (120 km2) and comprisedof a mosaic of creeks, open water, perennial marshes, seasonal wetlands, riparian forests, oak woodlands and grasslands... As the receiving water of a watershed where most of the county's human population lives, it is a landscape feature of critical importance to Sonoma County's water quality, flood control, and biodiversity. The Laguna's largest tributary is Santa Rosa Creek, which runs through Santa Rosa. Its major tributaries are Brush Creek, Mark West Creek, Matanzas Creek, Spring Creek and Piner Creek. Matanzas creek was shown to be polluted in Sonoma county first flush results.[citation needed] Other water bodies[edit] The boundary with Marin County runs from the mouth of the Estero Americano at Bodega Bay, up Americano Creek, then overland to San Antonio Creek and down the Petaluma River to its mouth at the northwest corner of San Pablo Bay, which adjoins San Francisco Bay. The southern edge of Sonoma County comprises the northern shore of San Pablo Bay between the Marin County border at the Petaluma River and the border with Solano County at Sonoma Creek. Sonoma County has no incorporated communities directly on the shore of San Pablo Bay. At the present there is only a private marina with related facilities called Port Sonoma near the mouth of the Petaluma River. However, the Petaluma River which flows into San Pablo Bay, is navigable up to the city of Petaluma. The Petaluma River, Tolay Creek, and Sonoma Creek enter the bay at the county's southernmost tip. The intertidal zone where they join the bay is the vast Napa Sonoma Marsh. Americano Creek, the Petaluma River, Tolay Creek, and Sonoma Creek are the principal streams draining the southern portion of the county. The Sonoma Valley is drained by Sonoma Creek, whose major tributaries are Yulupa Creek, Graham Creek, Calabazas Creek, Schell Creek and Carriger Creek; Arroyo Seco Creek is tributary to Schell Creek. Other creeks include Foss, Felta, and Mill creeks. Lakes and reservoirs in the county include Lake Sonoma, Tolay Lake, Lake Ilsanjo, Santa Rosa Creek Reservoir, Lake Ralphine, and Fountaingrove Lake. Marine protected areas of Sonoma County[edit] Like underwater parks, these marine protected areas help conserve ocean wildlife and marine ecosystems. Del Mar Landing State Marine Reserve Stewarts Point State Marine Reserve & Stewarts Point State Marine Conservation Area Salt Point State Marine Conservation Area Gerstle Cove State Marine Reserve Russian River State Marine Reserve and Russian River State Marine Conservation Area Bodega Head State Marine Reserve & Bodega Head State Marine Conservation Area Estero Americano State Marine Recreational Management Area Threatened/endangered species[edit] A number of endangered plants and animals are found in Sonoma County including the California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus), salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris), northern red-legged frog (Rana aurora), Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus), California freshwater shrimp (Syncaris pacifica), showy Indian clover (Trifolium amoenum) and Hickman's potentilla (Potentilla hickmanii). Species of special local concern include the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) and some endangered plants, including Burke's goldfields (Lasthenia burkei), Sebastopol meadowfoam (Limnanthes vinculans), and Sonoma sunshine or Baker's stickyseed (Blennosperma bakeri). Endangered species that are endemic to Sonoma County include Sebastopol meadowfoam, Sonoma sunshine, and Pitkin Marsh lily (Lilium pardalinum subsp. pitkinense). The Sonoma County Water Agency has had a Fisheries Enhancement Program since 1996. Its website says:[28] "The primary focus of the FEP is to enhance habitat for three salmonids: Steelhead, Chinook salmon, and Coho salmon. These three species are listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The California Department of Fish and Game considers the Coho salmon endangered." Adjacent counties[edit] Mendocino County, California - north Lake County, California - northeast Napa County, California - east Solano County, California - southeast Marin County, California - south Contra Costa County, California - south-southeast[29][30] National protected area[edit] San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge (part)


Transportation[edit] Major highways[edit] U.S. Route 101 U.S. Route 101 is the westernmost Federal highway in the U.S.A. Running north/south through the states of California, Oregon, and Washington, it generally parallels the coastline from the Mexico–US border to the Canada–US border. Highway 101 links seven of the county's nine incorporated cities: Cloverdale, Healdsburg, Windsor, Santa Rosa, Rohnert Park, Cotati, and Petaluma. It is a freeway for almost its entire length within the county, except for a section south of Petaluma. The four-lane sections of the highway have been heavily congested during peak commute hours for many years and work is being done to widen part of the highway to six lanes.The segment from north of Petaluma (at Old Redwood Highway/Petaluma Boulevard North exit) to Windsor has been fully widened. The two new inner lanes are designated for vehicles with two or more occupants during commute hours. Work is being done near the Sonoma/Marin county line which will also involve upgrading this segment of the highway to full freeway standards. State Route 1 Within Sonoma County, Highway 1 follows the coastline from the Mendocino County border, at the mouth of the Gualala River, to the Marin County border, at the Estero Americano (Americano Creek), east of Bodega Bay. State Route 12 State Route 12 in Sonoma (Broadway) Highway 12 runs eastward from its intersection with Highway 116 in Sebastopol to Santa Rosa. There it turns south through the Valley of the Moon to Sonoma, then east into Napa County. The four-lane freeway section within Santa Rosa, between Fulton Road and Farmers Lane, is called the Luther Burbank Memorial Highway. That section, especially where it crosses Highway 101, is severely congested during peak commute hours. The two-lane Bodega Highway runs west from the intersection of Highways 12 and 116 in Sebastopol, through the coastal hills to its intersection with Highway 1, east of Bodega Bay. East of Santa Rosa, Highway 12 is also called Sonoma Highway; and east of Sonoma, Carneros Highway. State Route 37 Highway 37 connects Highway 101 at Novato, in Marin County, with Interstate 80 in Vallejo, in Solano County, at the top of San Pablo Bay. Within Sonoma County, it is also called Sears Point Road. State Route 116 Highway 116 is a winding, two-lane rural route that runs from Jenner, at the mouth of the Russian River on the coast, southeast to Arnold Drive near Sonoma. It is also called Guerneville Highway, between Guerneville and Forestville; Gravenstein Highway North, between Forestville and Sebastopol; and Gravenstein Highway South, between Sebastopol and Stony Point Road, west of Rohnert Park. East of Petaluma it is Lakeville Highway, then Stage Gulch Road. State Route 121 Highway 121 is a two-lane rural route running from Highway 37 near Sears Point Raceway to Highway 128 in Lake Berryessa. State Route 128 The northernmost section of Highway 128 is a two-lane, rural route running southeast from Highway 101 at Geyserville, north of Healdsburg, through the Alexander Valley and into Napa County. Public transportation[edit] Sonoma County Transit is the countywide transit operator, providing service to all cities in Sonoma County. CityBus operates within the city limits of Santa Rosa.[31] The cities of Cloverdale and Petaluma also provide their own local bus service. Golden Gate Transit connects Santa Rosa and points south with Marin County and San Francisco. Mendocino Transit Authority runs north from Santa Rosa to Ukiah (via US 101) and to the coast (via California Routes 12 and 1). Valley of the Moon Commuter Club express service to San Francisco Sonoma–Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) is a commuter rail system planned to go between Larkspur in Marin County and Cloverdale in Sonoma County. A sales tax surcharge measure to finance it narrowly failed in the 2006 election, but passed in 2008. Airports[edit] The Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport is at 2290 Airport Boulevard, west of Highway 101, between Santa Rosa and Windsor. Its main runway is 5,115 feet (1,559 m) long and 150 feet (46 m) wide, and can accommodate planes up to 95,000 pounds (43,000 kg) maximum gross takeoff weight. It offers fuel, major maintenance, hangar space, and tie-downs for local and transient aircraft. Alaska Airlines offers regular daily commercial flights. Cloverdale Municipal Airport Healdsburg Municipal Airport Petaluma Municipal Airport Sonoma Skypark Sonoma Valley Airport Railroads[edit] Historical railroads of Sonoma County Mesa Grande train station, about 1910 The Petaluma and Haystack Railroad connected the city of Petaluma to a ferries of San Francisco Bay landing at the head of navigation on the Petaluma River in 1864. The San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad (SF&NP) connected the City of Santa Rosa to ferry connections at Donahue landing on the Petaluma River in 1870. Rail service was extended north to Healdsburg in 1871 and Cloverdale in 1872. In 1884 the railroad was extended south to an alternate ferry connection in Tiburon. This rail line is used by the 21st-century Sonoma–Marin Area Rail Transit.[32] The 3-foot-gauge North Pacific Coast Railroad extended northward in 1876 from a ferry connection at Sausalito through Valley Ford, Freestone and Occidental to Monte Rio on the lower Russian River. Service was extended to Duncan Mills in 1877 and Cazadero in 1885. The standard gauge Fulton and Guerneville Railroad left the SF&NP at Fulton to reach Korbel in 1876 and Guerneville in 1877. Standard-gauge rails were extended down-river to Duncan Mills in 1909 after the Northwestern Pacific Railroad merger, and narrow-gauge service was discontinued in 1930. The unique Sonoma Valley Prismoidal Railway linked the city of Sonoma to bay ferries in 1876, and was replaced in 1879 by the 3-foot (0.91 m)-gauge Sonoma Valley Railroad to a ferry landing near the mouth of the Petaluma River. Service was extended from Sonoma to Glen Ellen in 1882. The southern end of the line was extended westward in 1888 to a connection with the SF&NP at Ignacio. This line was converted to standard-gauge in 1890 and remains (in 2017) as Sonoma County's connection to the national rail system at Schellville. Southern Pacific subsidiary Santa Rosa and Carquinez Railroad extended eastward in 1888 to link Santa Rosa with the national rail system. A SF&NP branch line from Santa Rosa brought rail service to Sebastopol in 1890. The Petaluma and Santa Rosa Railroad extended interurban service north from a ferry connection in Petaluma to reach Sebastopol in 1904, Santa Rosa in 1905, and Forestville in 1906.


Crime[edit] The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense in the year of 2009. Population and crime rates Population[33] 478,551 Violent crime[34] 1,917 4.01   Homicide[34] 9 0.02   Forcible rape[34] 163 0.34   Robbery[34] 318 0.66   Aggravated assault[34] 1,427 2.98 Property crime[34] 4,537 9.48   Burglary[34] 1,993 4.16   Larceny-theft[34][note 1] 6,671 13.94   Motor vehicle theft[34] 786 1.64 Arson[34] 85 0.18 Cities by population and crime rates[edit] Cities by population and crime rates City Population[35] Violent crimes[35] Violent crime rate per 1,000 persons Property crimes[35] Property crime rate per 1,000 persons Cloverdale 8,775 6 0.68 157 17.89 Cotati 7,398 54 7.30 85 11.49 Healdsburg 11,458 18 1.57 271 23.65 Petaluma 58,995 167 2.83 822 13.93 Rohnert Park 41,716 192 4.60 770 18.46 Santa Rosa 170,862 636 3.72 3,818 22.35 Sebastopol 7,512 8 1.06 170 22.63 Sonoma 10,841 27 2.49 193 17.80 Windsor 27,293 67 2.45 318 11.65


Demographics[edit] 2011[edit] Population, race, and income Total population[33] 478,551   White[33] 390,474 81.6%   Black or African American[33] 7,161 1.5%   American Indian or Alaska Native[33] 5,962 1.2%   Asian[33] 19,249 4.0%   Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander[33] 1,513 0.3%   Some other race[33] 37,977 7.9%   Two or more races[33] 16,215 3.4%  Hispanic or Latino (of any race)[36] 116,222 24.3% Per capita income[37] $33,119 Median household income[38] $64,343 Median family income[39] $78,227 Places by population, race, and income[edit] Places by population and race Place Type[40] Population[33] White[33] Other[33] [note 2] Asian[33] Black or African American[33] Native American[33] [note 3] Hispanic or Latino (of any race)[36] Bloomfield CDP 186 93.0% 0.0% 7.0% 0.0% 0.0% 3.2% Bodega CDP 132 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% Bodega Bay CDP 772 87.2% 3.5% 9.3% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% Boyes Hot Springs CDP 7,284 74.8% 20.8% 3.4% 0.0% 1.1% 52.7% Carmet CDP 22 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% Cazadero CDP 305 92.8% 7.2% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 8.9% Cloverdale City 8,390 81.1% 13.6% 4.6% 0.2% 0.5% 30.2% Cotati City 7,154 87.9% 6.2% 4.4% 1.2% 0.2% 10.5% Eldridge CDP 1,899 74.6% 22.9% 1.8% 0.5% 0.2% 19.0% El Verano CDP 3,555 80.6% 13.3% 5.5% 0.0% 0.5% 28.2% Fetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente CDP 4,034 88.7% 7.1% 2.9% 0.7% 0.6% 41.2% Forestville CDP 3,268 86.6% 10.0% 3.1% 0.0% 0.2% 10.7% Fulton CDP 691 54.6% 36.0% 9.4% 0.0% 0.0% 36.0% Geyserville CDP 1,024 58.1% 37.6% 2.4% 0.0% 1.9% 56.7% Glen Ellen CDP 549 91.4% 7.3% 0.0% 1.3% 0.0% 10.4% Graton CDP 1,621 83.0% 14.4% 0.0% 0.3% 2.3% 22.8% Guerneville CDP 4,187 90.6% 5.4% 0.3% 2.1% 1.6% 11.6% Healdsburg City 11,161 79.1% 17.7% 0.3% 0.8% 2.2% 33.0% Jenner CDP 113 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% Kenwood CDP 509 80.6% 17.3% 2.2% 0.0% 0.0% 18.3% Larkfield-Wikiup CDP 8,569 88.3% 7.7% 3.3% 0.2% 0.5% 17.6% Monte Rio CDP 1,044 91.9% 5.9% 0.8% 0.0% 1.4% 2.4% Occidental CDP 1,264 88.8% 5.9% 4.0% 1.3% 0.0% 4.8% Penngrove CDP 2,428 90.6% 8.6% 0.8% 0.0% 0.0% 12.8% Petaluma City 57,265 83.5% 9.2% 5.1% 1.0% 1.1% 21.3% Rohnert Park City 40,741 78.6% 11.5% 6.6% 2.0% 1.4% 23.3% Roseland CDP 6,628 67.6% 27.1% 2.9% 1.8% 0.5% 58.5% Salmon Creek CDP 95 93.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% Santa Rosa City 164,976 78.2% 12.5% 5.1% 2.3% 1.9% 28.2% Sea Ranch CDP 812 97.9% 0.7% 1.4% 0.0% 0.0% 7.4% Sebastopol City 7,359 88.8% 6.8% 1.2% 0.7% 2.5% 10.8% Sereno del Mar CDP 119 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% Sonoma City 10,430 87.5% 8.0% 2.1% 0.4% 1.9% 16.6% Temelec CDP 1,510 97.3% 1.7% 1.1% 0.0% 0.0% 10.2% Timber Cove CDP 165 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 13.9% Valley Ford CDP 85 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 43.5% Windsor Town 26,229 80.1% 12.7% 3.0% 0.6% 3.7% 32.2% Places by population and income Place Type[40] Population[41] Per capita income[37] Median household income[38] Median family income[39] Bloomfield CDP 186 $31,592 $85,515 $85,735 Bodega CDP 132 $26,221 $21,750 $40,972 Bodega Bay CDP 772 $52,512 $73,250 $122,500 Boyes Hot Springs CDP 7,284 $24,218 $47,123 $48,382 Carmet CDP 22 [42] [42] [42] Cazadero CDP 305 $32,407 $46,875 $53,500 Cloverdale City 8,390 $25,745 $56,649 $71,233 Cotati City 7,154 $38,863 $62,969 $77,350 Eldridge CDP 1,899 $28,397 $94,688 $105,724 El Verano CDP 3,555 $27,189 $49,731 $53,409 Fetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente CDP 4,034 $29,849 $59,315 $63,879 Forestville CDP 3,268 $32,773 $53,095 $65,135 Fulton CDP 691 $25,734 $42,692 $125,417 Geyserville CDP 1,024 $23,915 $49,375 $51,250 Glen Ellen CDP 549 $33,389 $45,558 $56,250 Graton CDP 1,621 $36,676 $77,574 $91,946 Guerneville CDP 4,187 $30,594 $39,459 $61,250 Healdsburg City 11,161 $34,031 $63,666 $72,235 Jenner CDP 113 $45,432 $81,161 $42,422 Kenwood CDP 509 $76,096 $56,250 $144,318 Larkfield-Wikiup CDP 8,569 $33,798 $71,046 $92,243 Monte Rio CDP 1,044 $21,861 $31,667 $41,544 Occidental CDP 1,264 $46,895 $67,205 $104,375 Penngrove CDP 2,428 $39,270 $84,315 $98,407 Petaluma City 57,265 $35,111 $76,185 $92,192 Rohnert Park City 40,741 $28,203 $56,950 $71,726 Roseland CDP 6,628 $20,518 $54,255 $60,104 Salmon Creek CDP 95 $70,087 $80,694 $80,694 Santa Rosa City 164,976 $30,085 $60,850 $69,944 Sea Ranch CDP 812 $48,998 $57,227 $79,063 Sebastopol City 7,359 $35,459 $60,000 $85,391 Sereno del Mar CDP 119 $120,019 $162,986 $162,986 Sonoma City 10,430 $42,261 $63,262 $104,942 Temelec CDP 1,510 $37,406 $39,274 $44,960 Timber Cove CDP 165 $39,092 $42,143 $58,250 Valley Ford CDP 85 [42] [42] [42] Windsor Town 26,229 $31,009 $77,157 $86,425 2010[edit] Historical population Census Pop. %± 1850 560 — 1860 11,867 2,019.1% 1870 19,819 67.0% 1880 25,926 30.8% 1890 32,721 26.2% 1900 38,480 17.6% 1910 48,394 25.8% 1920 52,090 7.6% 1930 62,222 19.5% 1940 69,052 11.0% 1950 103,405 49.7% 1960 147,375 42.5% 1970 204,885 39.0% 1980 299,681 46.3% 1990 388,222 29.5% 2000 458,614 18.1% 2010 483,878 5.5% Est. 2016 503,070 [4] 4.0% U.S. Decennial Census[43] 1790-1960[44] 1900-1990[45] 1990-2000[46] 2010–2015[3] The 2010 United States Census reported that Sonoma County had a population of 483,878. The racial makeup of Sonoma County was 371,412 (76.8%) White, 7,610 (1.6%) African American, 6,489 (1.3%) Native American, 18,341 (3.8%) Asian, 1,558 (0.3%) Pacific Islander, 56,966 (11.8%) from other races, and 21,502 (4.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 120,430 persons (24.9%).[47] Population reported at 2010 United States Census The County Total Population White African American Native American Asian Pacific Islander other races two or more races Hispanic or Latino (of any race) Sonoma County 483,878 371,412 7,610 6,489 18,341 1,558 56,966 21,502 120,430 Incorporated cities and towns Total Population White African American Native American Asian Pacific Islander other races two or more races Hispanic or Latino (of any race) Cloverdale 8,618 6,458 48 156 98 7 1,530 321 2,824 Cotati 7,265 5,929 122 75 283 30 427 399 1,255 Healdsburg 11,254 8,334 56 205 125 18 2,133 383 3,820 Petaluma 57,941 46,566 801 353 2,607 129 5,103 2,382 12,453 Rohnert Park 40,971 31,178 759 407 2,144 179 3,967 2,337 9,068 Santa Rosa 167,815 119,158 4,079 2,808 8,746 810 23,723 8,491 47,970 Sebastopol 7,379 6,509 72 60 120 19 298 301 885 Sonoma 10,648 9,242 52 56 300 23 711 264 1,634 Windsor 26,801 19,798 227 594 810 51 4,052 1,269 8,511 Census-designated places Total Population White African American Native American Asian Pacific Islander other races two or more races Hispanic or Latino (of any race) Bloomfield 345 282 0 0 4 0 52 7 62 Bodega 220 209 0 2 2 0 0 7 9 Bodega Bay 1,077 951 2 4 33 4 49 34 126 Boyes Hot Springs 6,656 4,505 48 91 84 9 1,674 245 3,270 Carmet 47 43 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 Cazadero 354 318 1 7 5 0 5 18 23 El Verano 4,123 3,054 22 22 101 12 717 195 1,559 Eldridge 1,233 988 10 3 36 6 144 46 325 Fetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente 4,144 2,926 25 39 68 8 895 183 1,925 Forestville 3,293 2,914 32 36 53 6 153 99 406 Fulton 541 349 3 12 11 1 149 16 186 Geyserville 862 609 5 7 14 0 192 35 328 Glen Ellen 784 693 3 9 16 3 18 42 67 Graton 1,707 1,402 10 29 25 3 144 94 322 Guerneville 4,534 3,926 31 68 47 12 226 224 553 Jenner 136 125 2 0 2 0 0 7 8 Kenwood 1,028 930 1 1 23 2 45 26 79 Larkfield-Wikiup 8,884 7,042 81 168 292 19 878 404 1,979 Monte Rio 1,152 1,047 10 6 11 1 16 61 79 Occidental 1,115 992 7 7 31 0 23 55 81 Penngrove 2,522 2,212 19 24 54 2 112 99 292 Roseland 6,325 3,235 130 224 276 15 2,078 367 3,773 Salmon Creek 86 86 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Sea Ranch 1,305 1,220 15 3 10 0 37 20 117 Sereno del Mar 126 118 1 0 1 1 2 3 8 Temelec 1,441 1,376 4 4 31 5 5 16 68 Timber Cove 164 152 1 1 6 0 0 4 9 Valley Ford 147 105 1 0 0 0 33 8 52 Unincorporated communities Total Population White African American Native American Asian Pacific Islander other races two or more races Hispanic or Latino (of any race) All others not CDPs (combined) 90,835 76,431 930 1,008 1,871 183 7,375 3,037 16,303 2000[edit] At the 2000 census,[48] there were 458,614 people, 172,403 households, and 112,406 families in Sonoma County. The population density was 291/sq mi (112/km2). There were 183,153 housing units at an average density of 116/sq mi (45/km2). Of the 172,403 households, 50.3% were married couples living together, 34.8% were non-families, and 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present. 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 25.7% were individuals, and 10.0% were 65 years of age or older living alone. The average household size was 2.60, and the average family size was 3.12. The median age was 38 years. 24.5% were under 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% were 65 years of age or older. For every 100 females there were 97 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94 males. The median household income was $53,076, and the median family income was $61,921. Males had a median income of $42,035, females $32,022. The per capita income for the county was $25,724. About 4.7% of families and 8.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.4% of those under age 18 and 5.7% of those age 65 or over.


Metropolitan Statistical Area[edit] The United States Office of Management and Budget has designated Sonoma County as the Santa Rosa, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area.[49] The United States Census Bureau ranked the Santa Rosa, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area as the 105th most populous metropolitan statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012.[50] The Office of Management and Budget has further designated the Santa Rosa, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area as a component of the more extensive San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA Combined Statistical Area,[49] the 5th most populous combined statistical area and primary statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012.[50][51]


Government[edit] Sonoma County's governing board and legislative body is a five-member Board of Supervisors.[52] Supervisors are elected by district[53] at the Consolidated Primary Election, and serve for four years. The Supervisors also sit as directors of several local jurisdictions, such as the Water Agency,[54] and Agricultural Preservation & Open Space District.[55] The current supervisors (as of 2017) are: District 1: Susan Gorin, District 2: David Rabbitt, District 3: Shirlee Zane, District 4: James Gore, and District 5: Lynda Hopkins.[56] The Supervisors appoint the members of 59 boards, commissions, and committees.[57] The County Administrator[58] is the county's chief executive officer, reporting to the Board of Supervisors. The administrator manages the county's departments, such as the regional parks department. On December 15, 2009, the Board announced[59] the appointment of Veronica Ferguson to be the first woman County Administrator. She assumed office on February 1, 2010. On May 1, 2014, the county launched a public utility named Sonoma Clean Power.[60] This utility was created under the guidelines of Community Choice Aggregation. State and federal representation[edit] Sonoma County is split between California's 2nd and 5th congressional districts, represented by Jared Huffman (D–San Rafael) and Mike Thompson (D–St. Helena), respectively.[61] In the California State Assembly, Sonoma County is split between the 2nd, 4th, and 10th districts, which are held by Democrat Jim Wood, Democrat Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, and Democrat Marc Levine, respectively.[62] In the California State Senate, the county is split between the 2nd Senate District, represented by Democrat Mike McGuire, and the 3rd Senate District, represented by Democrat Bill Dodd. Law enforcement[edit] The Sonoma County Sheriff's Department is the law enforcement agency for the unincorporated area of the county. It also contracts to provide the police forces of the City of Sonoma and the Town of Windsor. The department has more than 1,000 employees, including more than 275 Deputy Sheriffs, in four Bureaus. More than 300 Correctional Officers and staff work in two jail facilities; Main Area Detention Facility and the North County Detention Facility, with a total daily population of nearly 1,200 inmates.[63] Police shootings in 2007 have led to calls for an independent civilian police review board.[64]


Economy[edit] Main articles: Sonoma County wine and Wine Country (California) Vineyard on northwest flank of Sonoma Mountain. Forbes Magazine ranked the Santa Rosa metropolitan area—essentially the entire county—185th out of 200, on its 2007 list of Best Places For Business And Careers.[65] It was second on the list five years before. Sonoma County was downgraded because of an increase in the cost of doing business, and reduced job growth, both blamed on increases in the cost of housing. Winemaking—both the growing of the grapes and their vinting—is an important part of the economic and cultural life of Sonoma County. In 2004, growers harvested 165,783 short tons (150,396 t)s) of wine grapes worth US$310 million. In 2006 the Sonoma County grape harvest amounted to over 185,000 tons, exceeding Napa County's harvest by over 30 percent.[66] About 80 percent of non-pasture agricultural land in the county is for growing wine grapes—58,280.4 acres (235.85 km2) in 2014 of vineyards, with over 1100 growers. The most common varieties planted are Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Pinot noir, though the area is also known for its Merlot and Zinfandel.[67] Sonoma County is home to more than 250 wineries with eleven distinct and two shared American Viticultural Areas, including the Sonoma Valley AVA, Russian River Valley AVA, Alexander Valley AVA, Bennett Valley AVA and Dry Creek Valley AVA, the last of which is known for the production of high-quality Zinfandels[citation needed].


Politics[edit] Sonoma County vote by party in presidential elections[68][69] Year GOP DEM Others 2016 22.0% 51,408 68.8% 160,435 9.2% 21,460 2012 25.3% 54,784 71.0% 153,942 3.8% 8,139 2008 24.0% 55,127 73.6% 168,888 2.3% 5,336 2004 30.9% 68,204 67.2% 148,261 1.9% 4,225 2000 32.3% 63,529 59.5% 117,295 8.2% 16,182 1996 29.5% 53,555 55.6% 100,738 14.9% 27,004 1992 24.1% 47,619 52.8% 104,334 23.1% 45,738 1988 41.9% 67,725 56.5% 91,262 1.6% 2,596 1984 51.1% 76,447 47.6% 71,295 1.3% 1,915 1980 48.2% 60,722 36.2% 45,596 15.6% 19,667 1976 47.7% 50,555 47.5% 50,353 4.8% 5,044 1972 54.7% 57,697 41.5% 43,746 3.8% 3,991 1968 48.8% 38,088 43.0% 33,587 8.2% 6,384 1964 38.4% 27,677 61.5% 44,354 0.2% 105 1960 54.1% 34,641 45.5% 29,147 0.4% 244 1956 61.9% 33,659 37.9% 20,616 0.2% 86 1952 66.1% 35,605 32.8% 17,675 1.1% 594 1948 55.2% 22,077 40.1% 16,026 4.7% 1,881 1944 50.4% 16,309 49.3% 15,949 0.3% 111 1940 51.9% 16,819 47.0% 15,230 1.0% 330 1936 39.0% 11,185 60.2% 17,273 0.9% 248 1932 35.7% 9,161 61.1% 15,686 3.2% 822 1928 59.7% 12,891 39.4% 8,506 0.9% 194 1924 56.0% 9,535 10.4% 1,767 33.6% 5,726 1920 66.9% 10,377 26.2% 4,070 6.9% 1,065 1916 50.4% 9,733 43.4% 8,377 6.3% 1,214 1912 0.2% 32 45.8% 6,500 54.0% 7,667[note 4] 1908 57.5% 5,427 33.6% 3,168 8.9% 844 1904 61.6% 5,269 32.9% 2,816 5.4% 463 1900 54.0% 4,381 43.4% 3,517 2.6% 209 1896 51.9% 4,053 46.0% 3,595 2.2% 168 1892 43.4% 3,016 49.7% 3,451 7.0% 483 Sonoma County vote by party in gubernatorial elections[70] Year GOP DEM 2014 25.2% 36,249 74.8% 107,328 2010 30.1% 55,472 64.7% 119,079 2006 47.0% 81,608 44.6% 77,392 2003 35.0% 54,651 40.7% 63,588 2002 29.9% 43,408 50.4% 73,079 1998 29.0% 46,616 64.3% 103,235 1994 45.7% 73,234 49.7% 79,720 1990 38.6% 54,706 55.8% 79,093 1986 59.4% 75,003 37.9% 47,859 1982 45.1% 55,968 51.2% 63,542 1978 35.9% 37,584 54.3% 56,920 1974 48.0% 40,339 48.5% 40,756 1970 58.6% 44,823 39.2% 29,953 1966 60.7% 41,516 39.3% 26,898 1962 49.7% 29,647 49.2% 29,373 Sonoma County was strongly Republican for most of the 20th century. Between 1896 and 1984 the only Democrats to carry Sonoma were Woodrow Wilson in 1912, Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936 and Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.[71] However, as a result of demographic changes in recent decades, it is now a strongly Democratic county in Presidential and congressional elections, and is now part of the solid bloc of blue counties in the San Francisco-Sacramento axis. The last Republican to win a majority in the county was Ronald Reagan in 1984, and the last Republican to represent a significant part of the county in Congress was Donald H. Clausen. On November 4, 2008 Sonoma County voted 66.1% against Proposition 8 which amended the California Constitution to ban same-sex marriages. According to the California Secretary of State, as of October 2012, there are 260,315 registered voters in Sonoma County. Of those, 134,234 (51.6%) are registered Democratic, 56,567 (21.7%) are registered Republican, and 55,010 (21.1%) declined to state a political party. Every city, town, and the unincorporated areas of Sonoma County have more registered Democrats than Republicans. Voter registration statistics[edit] Population and registered voters Total population[3] 502,146   Registered voters[72][note 5] 261,706 54.7%     Democratic[72] 134,896 51.5%     Republican[72] 56,428 21.6%     Democratic–Republican spread[72] +78,468 +29.9%     Independent[72] 6,619 2.5%     Green[72] 4,640 1.8%     Libertarian[72] 1,833 0.7%     Peace and Freedom[72] 792 0.3%     Americans Elect[72] 3 0.0%     Other[72] 829 0.3%     No party preference[72] 55,666 21.3% Cities by population and voter registration[edit] Cities by population and voter registration City Population[33] Registered voters[72] [note 5] Democratic[72] Republican[72] D–R spread[72] Other[72] No party preference[72] Cloverdale 8,390 51.8% 49.1% 24.7% +24.4% 7.9% 21.1% Cotati 7,154 57.4% 52.8% 17.8% +35.0% 10.3% 22.4% Healdsburg 11,161 56.5% 52.6% 21.7% +30.9% 7.5% 20.6% Petaluma 57,265 57.5% 52.3% 20.5% +31.8% 7.8% 22.0% Rohnert Park 40,741 50.1% 49.6% 21.3% +28.3% 8.8% 23.2% Santa Rosa 164,976 50.9% 52.1% 21.4% +30.7% 7.7% 21.4% Sebastopol 7,359 69.6% 61.4% 11.4% +50.0% 9.8% 19.5% Sonoma 10,430 65.0% 51.2% 22.8% +28.4% 8.1% 20.8% Windsor 26,229 54.4% 46.6% 27.5% +19.1% 7.5% 21.1%


Education[edit] See also: List of school districts in Sonoma County, California Higher education[edit] Empire College, Santa Rosa Golden Gate University (Rohnert Park satellite of Walnut Creek Campus) Santa Rosa Junior College Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park University of Northern California, Santa Rosa University of San Francisco (Santa Rosa Campus) The educational system of Sonoma County is similar to that of other counties in California. Library system[edit] The Sonoma County Library system offers a Central Library in downtown Santa Rosa, as well as ten branch libraries and two rural stations. More than half of Sonoma County's residents have library cards. They borrow over 2.5 million items a year. The Library's website and catalog receive over 200,000 visits annually. Staff answer nearly half a million reference questions annually for individuals, businesses and government agencies. They offer instruction in the use of Library resources in such fields as genealogy, grant writing, and use of the Internet. During a typical school year over 750 classes, more than half the county total, either visit a library or are visited by a children's librarian. The Library operates an adult literacy program, training volunteers to tutor individuals who lack basic reading ability. Computer terminals are made available for free Internet access.[73]


Museums[edit] City of Santa Rosa, A-26 Invader attack bomber built in 1944. The Pacific Coast Air Museum is on the southeast corner of the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport, next to the airplane hangar used in the 1963 Hollywood all-star comedy movie, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. Charles M. Schulz Museum Santa Rosa Sonoma County Museum Santa Rosa Luther Burbank Home and Gardens Santa Rosa Healdsburg Museum & Historical Society Healdsburg Hand Fan Museum of Healdsburg Healdsburg Petaluma Historical Library and Museum Petaluma Wildlife & Natural Science Museum[permanent dead link] Petaluma Military Antiques & Museum Petaluma Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Sonoma Depot Park Museum Sonoma West County Museum Sebastopol History Museum[permanent dead link] (aka The Gould-Shaw House Museum) Cloverdale California Indian Museum and Cultural Center Santa Rosa Cotati Museum Cotati


Places of interest[edit] Coastal prairie in the Sonoma Coast State Park north of Jenner Tolay Lake Regional Park Safari West Sonoma Coast State Beach,[74] including Arched Rock Beach, Gleason Beach and Goat Rock Beach. Bodega Bay Fort Ross, former Russian fur trade outpost Luther Burbank Home and Gardens Luther Burbank Gold Ridge Experiment Farm Quarryhill Botanic Garden Lake Sonoma Tolay Lake Regional Park Jack London State Historic Park, author Jack London's Beauty Ranch, in Glen Ellen Rancho Petaluma Adobe Mission San Francisco Solano, across from Sonoma Plaza Armstrong Redwoods State Reserve Stillwater Cove Sonoma TrainTown Railroad


Populated places[edit] Incorporated[edit] Sonoma County has nine incorporated municipalities. Downtown Santa Rosa, county seat of Sonoma County since 1854 Downtown Petaluma Incorporated communities Population[75] Incorporation Date[76] City of Cloverdale 8,618 February 28, 1872 City of Cotati 7,265 July 16, 1963 City of Healdsburg 11,254 February 20, 1867 City of Petaluma 57,941 April 12, 1858 City of Rohnert Park 40,971 August 28, 1962 City of Santa Rosa 167,815 March 26, 1868 City of Sebastopol 7,379 June 13, 1902 City of Sonoma 10,648 September 3, 1883 Town of Windsor 26,801 July 1, 1992 Unincorporated[edit] It also includes the following populated places which are not incorporated: Census-designated places[edit] Bloomfield Bodega Bodega Bay Boyes Hot Springs Carmet Cazadero El Verano Eldridge Fetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente Forestville Fulton Geyserville Glen Ellen Graton Guerneville Jenner Kenwood Larkfield-Wikiup Monte Rio Occidental Penngrove Roseland Salmon Creek Sea Ranch Serena del Mar Temelec Timber Cove Valley Ford Other unincorporated places[edit] Annapolis Asti Bodega Harbor Bridgehaven Buena Vista Cadwell Camp Meeker Carneros Cozzens Corners Cunningham Diamond A Ranch Duncans Mills El Bonita Forest Hills Freestone The Geysers Guernewood Park Hacienda Hessel Hilton Hollydale Jimtown Kellogg Knowles Corner Korbel Lakeville Lytton Mark West Mark West Springs Mercuryville Mesa Grande Mirabel Heights Mirabel Park Mission Highlands Monte Cristo Montesano Noel Heights Northwood Oakmont Odd Fellows Park Rancho Abajo Rio Dell Rio Nido Rolands Russian River Terrace Schellville Soda Springs Stewarts Point Summerhome Park Two Rock Vacation Beach Venado Villa Grande Vineburg Population ranking[edit] The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Sonoma County.[77] † county seat Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census) 1 † Santa Rosa City 167,815 2 Petaluma City 57,941 3 Rohnert Park City 40,971 4 Windsor Town 26,801 5 Healdsburg City 11,254 6 Sonoma City 10,648 7 Larkfield-Wikiup CDP 8,884 8 Cloverdale City 8,618 9 Sebastopol City 7,379 10 Cotati City 7,265 11 Boyes Hot Springs CDP 6,656 12 Roseland CDP 6,325 13 Guerneville CDP 4,534 14 Fetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente CDP 4,144 15 El Verano CDP 4,123 16 Forestville CDP 3,293 17 Penngrove CDP 2,522 18 Graton CDP 1,707 19 Temelec CDP 1,441 20 Sea Ranch CDP 1,305 21 Eldridge CDP 1,233 22 Monte Rio CDP 1,152 23 Occidental CDP 1,115 24 Bodega Bay CDP 1,077 25 Kenwood CDP 1,028 26 Geyserville CDP 862 27 Glen Ellen CDP 784 28 Fulton CDP 541 29 Cazadero CDP 354 30 Bloomfield CDP 345 31 Bodega CDP 220 32 Timber Cove CDP 164 33 Valley Ford CDP 147 34 Jenner CDP 136 35 Sereno del Mar CDP 126 36 Salmon Creek CDP 86 37 Stewarts Point Rancheria[78] AIAN 78 38 Carmet CDP 47


In popular culture[edit] Main article: Film locations in Sonoma County, California It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World airplane hangar, next to the Pacific Coast Air Museum, Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport. Due to the varied scenery in Sonoma County and proximity to the city of San Francisco, a large number of motion pictures have been filmed using venues within the county. Some of the earliest U.S. filmmaking occurred in Sonoma County such as Salomy Jane (1914) and one of Broncho Billy Anderson's 1915 Westerns. Many of these films are classics in American cinematography such as the 1947 film The Farmer's Daughter (starring Joseph Cotten and Loretta Young) and two Alfred Hitchcock films, Shadow of a Doubt of 1943, filmed and set in Santa Rosa and The Birds of 1963, filmed largely in Bodega Bay and Bodega. Many other modern classics have used Sonoma County as a filming venue, including American Graffiti, filmed largely in Petaluma. A few other representative films produced partially in Sonoma County are: Sonoma County 1965 The Third Day 1986 Peggy Sue Got Married - Petaluma, including a 1950s makeover of Washington St., the diner "Millie's Chili Bar" (rechristened as "The Donut Hole"), and exterior and interior shots of Santa Rosa High School. 1993 Nowhere to Run - Coleman Valley Road, Occidental, for farmhouse and pond scenes. 2001 The Man Who Wasn't There 2001 Bandits - Flamingo Hotel, Clover milk truck featuring local icon "Clo the cow" and rural county roads. Cloverdale 1955 Many Rivers to Cross - Big Sulphur Creek 1993 So I Married an Axe Murderer - Cloverdale Airport Glen Ellen 1982 Shoot the Moon - Glen Ellen and Jack London's Wolf House. Petaluma 1972 American Graffiti 1977 Heroes - Bus stop at corner of Kentucky and C streets. Walnut Street. Russian River 1925 Braveheart - Along the river. 1942 Holiday Inn - Village Inn Lodge in Monte Rio as the "Holiday Inn" with tons of artificial snow. Santa Rosa 1963 It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World - Sequence involving the plane flying full bore, at about 150 knots, through an airplane hangar in less than a second, was shot at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport. Sebastopol 1949 Thieves' Highway - Gold Ridge Road. Sonoma 1988 Tucker: The Man and His Dream. 1996 Scream - Sonoma Community Center on East Napa Street. The town of Sonoma hosts the annual Sonoma Valley Film Festival.


See also[edit] San Francisco Bay Area portal List of Sonoma County Regional Parks facilities National Register of Historic Places listings in Sonoma County, California Sonoma County Water Agency


Notes[edit] ^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes. ^ Other = Some other race + Two or more races ^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native ^ This total comprised 5,806 votes for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt (who was official Republican nominee in California), 1,494 votes for Socialist Eugene V. Debs and 367 votes for Prohibition Party nominee Eugene W. Chafin. ^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.


References[edit] ^ "Chronology". California State Association of Counties. Retrieved February 6, 2015.  ^ "Cobb Mountain-Southwest Peak". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved February 4, 2015.  ^ a b c d "Sonoma County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 6, 2016.  ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.  ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07.  ^ "Sonoma County Indicators: 2007" (PDF). Sonoma County. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 24, 2015. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "Sonoma County Flood Control and Water Conservation District: History". Sonoma County Water Agency. Archived from the original on October 2, 2009.  ^ "Sonoma County Agricultural Preservation and Open Space District". Sonoma County. Archived from the original on December 31, 2006. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "California County History". CSAC.org. California State Association of Counties. 2014. Retrieved 2015-09-22.  ^ "Sonoma County History". Calarchives4u.com. Archived from the original on March 19, 2014. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "History of Sonoma County". ap.net. AccessPort. Archived from the original on January 7, 2012.  ^ "Sonoma County General Plan - Public Safety Element". October 11, 2008. Archived from the original on January 20, 2008.  ^ Jones, Kevin L. (11 October 2017). "Bernie Krause's Equipment, Decades of Musical Memorabilia Lost in Fires". KQED Arts. Retrieved 12 October 2017.  ^ a b Gudde, Erwin Gustav; Bright, William (1998). California Place Names: The Origin and Etymology of Current Geographical Names (Second ed.). Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. g. 370. ISBN 0-520-21316-5.  ^ May, James (May 19, 2003). "Why Graton is trying to get into gaming". Indian Country Today. Retrieved 2009-01-25.  ^ Hanna, Phil Townsend (1951). The Dictionary of California Land Names. Los Angeles: The Automobile Club of Southern California. p. 311.  ^ Alfred Louis Kroeber (1976). Handbook of the Indians of California. New York City, N.Y.: Dover Publications.  ^ Alfred L. Kroeber, AAE 29:354 [1932] ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.  ^ "Annadel State Park". Parks and Recreation in Sonoma County. Archived from the original on October 11, 1997.  ^ "Sonoma County Climatic Zones" (PDF). University of California Cooperative Extension. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 12, 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-30.  ^ a b Forrey, Rip. "Climate data for various locations in Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, Lake and Marin counties, California" (PDF). University of California Cooperative Extension Sonoma County. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 30, 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-30.  ^ Freedman, Wayne (2006-04-05). "Rainiest Town In The Bay Area Up For Sale". KGO-TV News. Retrieved 2007-12-13.  ^ "Subsection M261Be Konocti Flows". U.S. Forest Service. Archived from the original on 2011-09-22. Retrieved 2014-02-22.  ^ Carolyn Jones (May 27, 2010). "Bay Area beaches grade well for safe swimming". San Francisco Chronicle.  ^ "The Ecology of the Laguna de Santa Rosa". lagunafoundation.org. Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "Ecology". lagunadesantarosa.org. Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation. Archived from the original on February 6, 2007.  ^ "Fisheries Enhancement Program". Sonoma County Water Agency. Archived from the original on October 2, 2009.  ^ Marin, Solono, Sonoma and Contra Costa Counties' borders come to a common point approx. 6 miles into San Francisco Bay. Thus, Contra Costa County is an adjacent county. Hittell, Theodore Henry (1876). The codes and statutes of the State of California. A. L. Bancroft. p. 515. Retrieved August 20, 2012.  ^ "California Codes, Government Codes, section 23149". Retrieved August 20, 2012.  ^ "CityBus". City of Santa Rosa. Retrieved February 4, 2015.  ^ "About SMART". sonomamarintrain.org. Retrieved 31 December 2017.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. American FactFinder Archived September 11, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-10-26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009 Archived December 2, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-11-14. ^ a b c United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. American FactFinder Archived September 11, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-10-26. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. American FactFinder Archived September 11, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-10-21. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. American FactFinder Archived September 11, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-10-21. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. American FactFinder Archived September 11, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-10-21. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. American FactFinder Archived September 11, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-10-21. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. American FactFinder Archived September 11, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 2013-10-21. ^ a b c d e f Data unavailable ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 31, 2014.  ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 31, 2014.  ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014.  ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014.  ^ "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau.  ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2011-05-14.  ^ a b "OMB Bulletin No. 13-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). United States Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.  ^ a b "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012" (CSV). 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.  ^ "Table 2. Annual Estimates of the Population of Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012" (CSV). 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.  ^ "Board of Supervisors". Sonoma County. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "Supervisorial Districts". sonoma-county.org. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "Sonoma County Water Agency". scwa.org. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "Sonoma County Agricultural Preservation and Open Space District". sonomaopenspace.org. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "Board of Supervisors". County of Sonoma. Retrieved January 8, 2015.  ^ "Boards, Commissions, Committees & Task Forces". sonoma-county.org. June 29, 2011. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "County Administrators Office". Departments and Agencies. Sonoma County. Archived from the original on February 9, 2014.  ^ "Press Release: Supervisors Announce New County Administrator" (PDF). Sonoma County. December 15, 2009. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ GNECKOW, ERIC (May 1, 2014). "Sonoma Clean Power flips switch for first customers". The North Bay Business Journal. Retrieved 24 November 2016.  ^ "California's 5th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013.  ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 2, 2013.  ^ "Sheriff's Department Overview". Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. April 19, 2002. Archived from the original on July 27, 2014. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ Santa Rosa Press Democrat, 3/30/07: Fatal police shootings rekindle review debate/Recent cases raise decade-old concerns over agencies' abilities to investigate each other ^ Kurt Badenhausen (April 5, 2007). "Best Places For Business And Careers". Forbes. Retrieved July 17, 2014.  ^ "2006 Sonoma County grape harvest statistics: Sonoma County Vintners association". Sonoma County Vintner. [dead link] ^ "Sonoma County Crop Report 2014" (PDF). www.sonoma-county.org/agcomm. Retrieved 11 August 2015.  ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/ ^ "Current Election Results". Sonoma County Registrar of Voters. Retrieved December 1, 2016.  ^ "Final Results for Consolidated General Election – November 4, 2014". Sonoma County Registrar of Voters. Retrieved December 1, 2016.  ^ Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868-2004, pp. 152-155 ISBN 0786422173 ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration. Retrieved 2013-10-31. ^ "California Library Statistics" California Library Statistics - 2011-2012 Retrieved February 10, 2015 ^ "Sonoma County Regional Parks". parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov. 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Further reading[edit] An Illustrated History of Sonoma County, California. Lewis Publishing Company. 1889. OCLC 04107195.  California Gazetteer. Wilmington: American Historical Publications. 1985. ISBN 0937862754. OCLC 12372425.  Finley, Ernest L. (1937). History of Sonoma County, California: Its People and Its Resources. Santa Rosa: Press Democrat Pub. Co. OCLC 21868591.  Gille, Frank H. ed. (1998). The Encyclopedia of California. St. Clair Shores: Somerset Publishers, Inc. ISBN 9780403098705. OCLC 894506127. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Gregory, Thomas Jefferson (1911). History of Sonoma County, California, with Biographical Sketches of the Leading Men and Women of the County, Who Have Been Identified with Its Growth and Development from the Early Days to the Present Time. Los Angeles: Historic Record Company. OCLC 04387962.  Hansen, Harvey J.; Miller, Jeanne Thurlow (1962). Wild Oats in Eden; Sonoma County in the 19th Century. Santa Rosa. OCLC 01847987.  Historical Atlas Maps of Sonoma County, California. Oakland: Thos. H. Thompson & Co. 1877. OCLC 06166297.  Munro-Fraser, J. P. (1880). History of Sonoma County: Including Its Geology, Topography, Mountains, Valleys and Streams ... Alley, Bowen & Co. OCLC 06846293.  Taber, George M. (2005). Judgment of Paris: California vs. France and the Historic 1976 Paris Tasting that Revolutionized Wine. NY: Scribner. ISBN 9780743247511. OCLC 58843337.  Thompson, Robert A. (1877). Historical and Descriptive Sketch of Sonoma County, California. L.H. Everts & Co. OCLC 06840554.  Thompson, Robert A. (1884). Central Sonoma: A Brief Description of the Township and Town of Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California, Its Climate and Resources. W.M. Hinton & Company. OCLC 11855702.  Thompson, Robert A. (1896). Conquest of California: Capture of Sonoma by Bear Flag Men June 14, 1846. Raising of the American Flag in Monterey by Commodore John D. Sloat, July 7, 1846. Sonoma Democrat. OCLC 02540771.  Thompson, Robert A. (1896). The Russian Settlement in California. Sonoma Democrat Publishing Company. OCLC 15538413.  Tuomey, Honoria (1926). History of Sonoma County, California. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co. OCLC 12074234. , Volume one, Volume two


External links[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Sonoma County, California. Sonoma County official website Sonoma.com Sonoma Economic Development Board Sonoma County, California at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Parks and Recreation in Sonoma County Sonoma County Historical Society North Bay Regional Collection at Sonoma State University Library Places adjacent to Sonoma County, California Mendocino County Lake County Pacific Ocean Sonoma County, California Napa County Marin County Solano County v t e Municipalities and communities of Sonoma County, California, United States County seat: Santa Rosa Cities and towns Cloverdale Cotati Healdsburg Petaluma Rohnert Park Santa Rosa Sebastopol Sonoma Windsor CDPs Bloomfield Bodega Bodega Bay Boyes Hot Springs Carmet Cazadero El Verano Eldridge Fetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente Forestville Fulton Geyserville Glen Ellen Graton Guerneville Jenner Kenwood Larkfield-Wikiup Monte Rio Occidental Penngrove Roseland Salmon Creek Sea Ranch Sereno del Mar Temelec Timber Cove Valley Ford Unincorporated communities Annapolis Asti Camp Meeker Duncans Mills Fort Ross Freestone Guernewood Park Hacienda Korbel Lakeville Mark West Mark West Springs Rio Dell Rio Nido Schellville Stewarts Point Two Rock Venado Villa Grande Vineburg Indian reservations Dry Creek Rancheria Graton Rancheria Stewarts Point Rancheria v t e North Bay Counties Marin Napa Sonoma Major cities Santa Rosa Cities and towns 25k-100k Rohnert Park Napa Novato Petaluma San Rafael Windsor Cities and towns 10k-25k American Canyon Healdsburg Larkspur Mill Valley San Anselmo Sonoma Tamalpais-Homestead Valley Cities and towns under 10k Belvedere Black Point-Green Point Bodega Bay Bolinas Boyes Hot Springs Calistoga Cloverdale Corte Madera Cotati Deer Park Dillon Beach Eldridge Elmira El Verano Fairfax Fetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente Forestville Fulton Geyserville Glen Ellen Graton Guerneville Inverness Kentfield Kenwood Lagunitas-Forest Knolls Larkfield-Wikiup Lucas Valley-Marinwood Marin City Monte Rio Muir Beach Occidental Penngrove Point Reyes Station Roseland Ross San Geronimo Santa Venetia Sausalito Sea Ranch Sebastopol St. Helena Stinson Beach Strawberry Temelec Tiburon Tomales Woodacre Yountville v t e San Francisco Bay Area Bodies of water Bodega Bay Carquinez Strait Clifton Forebay Golden Gate Grizzly Bay Guadalupe River Half Moon Bay Lake Berryessa Napa River Oakland Estuary Petaluma River Richardson Bay Richmond Inner Harbor Russian River Sacramento River San Francisco Bay San Leandro Bay San Pablo Bay Sonoma Creek Suisun Bay Tomales Bay Counties Alameda Contra Costa Marin Napa San Francisco San Mateo Santa Clara Solano Sonoma Major cities San Jose San Francisco Oakland Cities and towns 100k–250k Antioch Berkeley Concord Daly City Fairfield Fremont Hayward Richmond Santa Clara Santa Rosa Sunnyvale Vallejo Cities and towns 50k–99k Alameda Brentwood Castro Valley Cupertino Livermore Milpitas Mountain View Napa Novato Palo Alto Petaluma Pittsburg Pleasanton Redwood City San Leandro San Mateo San Rafael San Ramon South San Francisco Union City Vacaville Walnut Creek Cities and towns 25k-50k Belmont Benicia Burlingame Campbell Danville Dublin East Palo Alto Foster City Gilroy Los Altos Los Gatos Martinez Menlo Park Morgan Hill Newark Oakley Pacifica Pleasant Hill Rohnert Park San Bruno San Carlos San Pablo Saratoga Suisun City Windsor Cities and towns 10k–25k Alamo Albany American Canyon Ashland Bay Point Cherryland Clayton Discovery Bay Dixon El Cerrito El Sobrante Emeryville Fairview Half Moon Bay Healdsburg Hercules Hillsborough Lafayette Larkspur Millbrae Mill Valley Moraga North Fair Oaks Orinda Piedmont Pinole San Anselmo San Lorenzo Sonoma Stanford Tamalpais-Homestead Valley Sub-regions East Bay North Bay San Francisco Peninsula Silicon Valley South Bay Politics Sports Transportation v t e  State of California Sacramento (capital) Topics Culture Food Music Myth Sports Demographics Earthquakes Economy Education Environment Geography Climate Ecology Flora Fauna Government Capitol Districts Governor 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San Francisco Fresno Sacramento Long Beach Oakland Bakersfield Anaheim Authority control WorldCat Identities VIAF: 145425277 GND: 4433242-7 Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sonoma_County,_California&oldid=826421965" Categories: 1850 establishments in CaliforniaPopulated places established in 1850California wineSonoma County, CaliforniaCounties in the San Francisco Bay AreaCalifornia countiesHidden categories: Webarchive template wayback linksAll articles with dead external linksArticles with dead external links from July 2014Use mdy dates from October 2014Coordinates on WikidataAll articles with unsourced statementsArticles with unsourced statements from February 2015Articles with unsourced statements from March 2010Articles with unsourced statements from May 2013Articles with dead external links from July 2017Articles with permanently dead external linksCS1 maint: Extra text: authors listOfficial website different in Wikidata and WikipediaArticles with Curlie 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County (United States)Lake SonomaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaSonoma PlazaBodega Bay, CaliforniaOfficial Seal Of Sonoma County, CaliforniaLocation In The U.S. State Of CaliforniaSonoma County, California Is Located In The USGeographic Coordinate SystemList Of Sovereign StatesUnited StatesU.S. StateCaliforniaList Of Regions Of CaliforniaSan Francisco Bay AreaMunicipal CorporationNamesakeSonoma, CaliforniaCounty SeatSanta Rosa, California2010 United States CensusTime ZonePacific Time ZoneUTC−8Daylight Saving TimePacific Daylight TimeUTC−7North American Numbering PlanArea Code 707Federal Information Processing StandardGeographic Names Information SystemCounty (United States)U.S. StateCalifornia2010 United States CensusCounty SeatSanta Rosa, CaliforniaMarin County, CaliforniaMendocino County, CaliforniaNapa County, CaliforniaLake County, CaliforniaMetropolitan Statistical AreaSan Jose, CaliforniaSan FranciscoOakland, CaliforniaSan Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA Combined Statistical AreaSan Francisco Bay AreaWine Country (California)Napa County, CaliforniaMendocino County, CaliforniaLake County, CaliforniaAmerican Viticultural AreaAgriculturalSonoma State UniversitySanta Rosa Junior CollegeNative Americans In The United StatesTribeSettlerLand UseAgriculturalMonocultureGrapeHabitatPomo PeopleCoast MiwokWappoRock CarvingPecked Curvilinear NucleatedSpanish PeopleRussiansEthnic Groups In EuropeWikipedia:Citation NeededRussian-American CompanyFort Ross, CaliforniaAleut PeopleJohn SutterLand GrantSacramento, CaliforniaWikipedia:Citation NeededEnlargeFort Ross, CaliforniaMission San Francisco SolanoSpanish Missions Of CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaEl Camino Real (California)Presidio Of SonomaSpanish Missions In CaliforniaMariano Guadalupe VallejoCalifornia RepublicWikipedia:Citation NeededCounty SeatPetaluma, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaJoseph HookerMendocino County, CaliforniaPetaluma RiverSan Francisco And North Pacific RailroadFerries Of San Francisco BayWikipedia:Citation NeededWikipedia:Citation NeededSpanish EmpireJuan Rodríguez CabrilloRussian River (California)Sebastián VizcaínoKingdom Of EnglandGolden HindFrancis DrakeBodega BaySpanish EmpireJuan Francisco De La Bodega Y QuadraMexicoRussian EmpireFort RossFirst Mexican EmpireAgustín De IturbideMexicoCalifornia RepublicHistory Of California1906 San Francisco EarthquakeFault (geology)October 2017 Northern California WildfiresEnlargePomoSonoma ValleyMariano Guadalupe VallejoJack LondonThe Valley Of The Moon (novel)Sacramento RiverWintu LanguagePatwinSuisun PeopleEnlargeHood MountainVineyardU.S. Census BureauCalifornia Coast RangesMayacamas MountainsSonoma MountainsSears PointMt. Saint HelenaPygmy ForestCupressus PigmaeaSonoma MountainJack London State Historic ParkFairfield Osborn PreserveSonoma ValleySanta Rosa, CaliforniaRussian River (California)Alexander Valley AVADry Creek Valley AVAWoodlandSequoia SempervirensNorthern California Coastal Forests (WWF Ecoregion)Northern Coastal ScrubGrasslandMarshSavannaRiparian ZoneCalifornia Oak WoodlandYulupa CreekSpring Creek (Sonoma County, California)Annadel State ParkBiodiversityBunchgrassUnderstoryGrazingAgricultureArbutus MenziesiiPseudotsuga Menziesii Var. MenziesiiQuercus AgrifoliaQuercus GarryanaCalifornia LaurelHeteromelesToxicodendron DiversilobumGarrya EllipticaEnlargeCotati, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaPetaluma GapCloverdale, CaliforniaGuerneville, CaliforniaGasquet, CaliforniaMayacamas MountainsMount Saint HelenaCobb MountainEnlargeGoat Rock BeachEstuaryRussian River (California)Bodega BayGualala RiverMendocino CountyLaguna De Santa RosaUkiah, CaliforniaLake MendocinoLake SonomaDry Creek (Sonoma County, California)Jenner, CaliforniaSanta Rosa CreekBrush Creek (Sonoma County, California)Matanzas CreekSpring Creek (Sonoma County, California)Piner CreekWikipedia:Citation NeededEstero AmericanoBodega BaySan Antonio Creek (Marin County, California)San Pablo BaySan Francisco BayMarin CountySonoma CreekPetaluma RiverTolay CreekNapa Sonoma MarshAmericano CreekYulupa CreekGraham CreekCalabazas CreekCarriger CreekArroyo Seco CreekLake SonomaTolay LakeLake IlsanjoSanta Rosa Creek ReservoirLake RalphineFountaingrove LakeDel Mar Landing State Marine ReserveStewarts Point State Marine Reserve & Stewarts Point State Marine Conservation AreaSalt Point State Marine Conservation AreaGerstle Cove State Marine ReserveRussian River State Marine Reserve And Russian River State Marine Conservation AreaBodega Head State Marine Reserve & Bodega Head State Marine Conservation AreaEstero Americano State Marine Recreational Management AreaCalifornia Clapper RailSalt Marsh Harvest MouseNorthern Red-legged FrogSacramento SplittailSyncaris PacificaTrifolium AmoenumPotentilla HickmaniiCalifornia Tiger SalamanderLasthenia BurkeiLimnanthes VinculansBlennosperma BakeriEndemic (ecology)Lilium Pardalinum Subsp. PitkinenseSonoma County Water AgencySalmonidRainbow TroutChinook SalmonCoho SalmonEndangered Species ActMendocino County, CaliforniaLake County, CaliforniaNapa County, CaliforniaSolano County, CaliforniaMarin County, CaliforniaContra Costa County, CaliforniaSan Pablo Bay National Wildlife RefugeU.S. Route 101 In CaliforniaUnited States Numbered HighwaysOregonMexico–United States BorderCanada–United States BorderHigh-occupancy VehicleInterstate Highway StandardsCalifornia State Route 1Americano CreekCalifornia State Route 12EnlargeCalifornia State Route 12California State Route 37California State Route 116California State Route 121California State Route 128Sonoma County TransitGolden Gate TransitMendocino Transit AuthorityValley Of The Moon Commuter ClubSonoma–Marin Area Rail TransitLarkspur, CaliforniaCharles M. Schulz - Sonoma County AirportHangarAircraftAlaska AirlinesCloverdale Municipal AirportHealdsburg Municipal AirportPetaluma Municipal AirportSonoma SkyparkSonoma Valley AirportEnlargeEnlargeFerries Of San Francisco BaySan Francisco And North Pacific RailroadTiburon, CaliforniaSonoma–Marin Area Rail TransitNarrow Gauge RailwayNorth Pacific Coast RailroadStandard GaugeNorthwestern Pacific RailroadIgnacio, CaliforniaSouthern PacificPetaluma And Santa Rosa RailroadInterurbanCloverdale, CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaBloomfield, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceBodega, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceBodega Bay, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceBoyes Hot Springs, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceCarmet, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceCazadero, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceCloverdale, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaEldridge, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceEl Verano, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceFetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceForestville, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceFulton, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGeyserville, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGlen Ellen, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGraton, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGuerneville, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceHealdsburg, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaJenner, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceKenwood, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceLarkfield-Wikiup, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceMonte Rio, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceOccidental, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlacePenngrove, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlacePetaluma, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaRoseland, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSalmon Creek, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSanta Rosa, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaSea Ranch, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSebastopol, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaSereno Del Mar, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSonoma, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaTemelec, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceTimber Cove, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceValley Ford, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceWindsor, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaBloomfield, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceBodega, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceBodega Bay, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceBoyes Hot Springs, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceCarmet, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceCazadero, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceCloverdale, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaEldridge, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceEl Verano, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceFetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceForestville, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceFulton, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGeyserville, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGlen Ellen, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGraton, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceGuerneville, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceHealdsburg, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaJenner, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceKenwood, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceLarkfield-Wikiup, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceMonte Rio, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceOccidental, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlacePenngrove, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlacePetaluma, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaRoseland, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSalmon Creek, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSanta Rosa, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaSea Ranch, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSebastopol, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaSereno Del Mar, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceSonoma, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In CaliforniaTemelec, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceTimber Cove, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceValley Ford, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceWindsor, CaliforniaList Of Cities And Towns In California1850 United States Census1860 United States Census1870 United States Census1880 United States Census1890 United States Census1900 United States Census1910 United States Census1920 United States Census1930 United States Census1940 United States Census1950 United States Census1960 United States Census1970 United States Census1980 United States Census1990 United States Census2000 United States Census2010 United States Census2010 United States CensusWhite (U.S. Census)African American (U.S. Census)Native American (U.S. Census)Asian (U.S. Census)Pacific Islander (U.S. Census)Race (United States Census)Hispanic (U.S. Census)Latino (U.S. Census)2010 United States CensusWhite (U.S. Census)African American (U.S. Census)Native American (U.S. Census)Asian (U.S. Census)Pacific Islander (U.S. Census)Race (United States Census)Hispanic (U.S. Census)Latino (U.S. Census)Incorporated CityWhite (U.S. Census)African American (U.S. Census)Native American (U.S. Census)Asian (U.S. Census)Pacific Islander (U.S. Census)Race (United States Census)Hispanic (U.S. Census)Latino (U.S. Census)Cloverdale, CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceWhite (U.S. Census)African American (U.S. Census)Native American (U.S. Census)Asian (U.S. Census)Pacific Islander (U.S. Census)Race (United States Census)Hispanic (U.S. Census)Latino (U.S. Census)Bloomfield, CaliforniaBodega, CaliforniaBodega Bay, CaliforniaBoyes Hot Springs, CaliforniaCarmet, CaliforniaCazadero, CaliforniaEl Verano, CaliforniaEldridge, CaliforniaFetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente, CaliforniaForestville, CaliforniaFulton, CaliforniaGeyserville, CaliforniaGlen Ellen, CaliforniaGraton, CaliforniaGuerneville, CaliforniaJenner, CaliforniaKenwood, CaliforniaLarkfield-Wikiup, CaliforniaMonte Rio, CaliforniaOccidental, CaliforniaPenngrove, CaliforniaRoseland, CaliforniaSalmon Creek, CaliforniaSea Ranch, CaliforniaSereno Del Mar, CaliforniaTemelec, CaliforniaTimber Cove, CaliforniaValley Ford, CaliforniaUnincorporated AreaWhite (U.S. Census)African American (U.S. Census)Native American (U.S. Census)Asian (U.S. Census)Pacific Islander (U.S. Census)Race (United States Census)Hispanic (U.S. Census)Latino (U.S. Census)CensusPer Capita IncomePoverty LineUnited States Office Of Management And BudgetSanta Rosa, CA Metropolitan Statistical AreaUnited States Census BureauList Of Metropolitan Statistical AreasMetropolitan Statistical AreaSan Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA Combined Statistical AreaList Of Combined Statistical AreasCombined Statistical AreaUnited States Primary Statistical AreaPublic UtilityCommunity Choice AggregationCommunity Choice AggregationCalifornia's 2nd Congressional DistrictCalifornia's 5th Congressional DistrictJared HuffmanDemocratic Party (United States)San Rafael, CaliforniaMike Thompson (California Politician)Democratic Party (United States)St. Helena, CaliforniaCalifornia State AssemblyCalifornia's 2nd State Assembly DistrictCalifornia's 4th State Assembly DistrictCalifornia's 10th State Assembly DistrictCalifornia Democratic PartyJim Wood (California Politician)California Democratic PartyCecilia Aguiar-CurryCalifornia Democratic PartyMarc LevineCalifornia State SenateCalifornia's 2nd State Senate DistrictCalifornia Democratic PartyMike McGuire (politician)California's 3rd State Senate DistrictCalifornia Democratic PartyBill Dodd (California Politician)Sonoma County WineWine Country (California)EnlargeSonoma MountainWinemakingNapa CountyVineyardChardonnayCabernet SauvignonPinot NoirMerlotZinfandelAmerican Viticultural AreaSonoma Valley AVARussian River Valley AVAAlexander Valley AVABennett Valley AVADry Creek (Sonoma County, California)ZinfandelWikipedia:Citation NeededRepublican Party (United States)Democratic Party (United States)United States Presidential Election In California, 2016United States Presidential Election In California, 2012United States Presidential Election In California, 2008United States Presidential Election In California, 2004United States Presidential Election In California, 2000United States Presidential Election In California, 1996United States Presidential Election In California, 1992United States Presidential Election In California, 1988United States Presidential Election In California, 1984United States Presidential Election In California, 1980United States Presidential Election In California, 1976United States Presidential Election In California, 1972United States Presidential Election In California, 1968United States Presidential Election In California, 1964United States Presidential Election In California, 1960United States Presidential Election In California, 1956United States Presidential Election In California, 1952United States Presidential Election In California, 1948United States Presidential Election In California, 1944United States Presidential Election In California, 1940United States Presidential Election In California, 1936United States Presidential Election In California, 1932United States Presidential Election In California, 1928United States Presidential Election In California, 1924United States Presidential Election In California, 1920United States Presidential Election In California, 1916United States Presidential Election In California, 1912United States Presidential Election In California, 1908United States Presidential Election In California, 1904United States Presidential Election In California, 1900United States Presidential Election In California, 1896United States Presidential Election In California, 1892Republican Party (United States)Democratic Party (United States)California Gubernatorial Election, 2014California Gubernatorial Election, 2010California Gubernatorial Election, 2006California Gubernatorial Recall ElectionCalifornia Gubernatorial Election, 2002California Gubernatorial Election, 1998California Gubernatorial Election, 1994California Gubernatorial Election, 1990California Gubernatorial Election, 1986California Gubernatorial Election, 1982California Gubernatorial Election, 1978California Gubernatorial Election, 1974California Gubernatorial Election, 1970California Gubernatorial Election, 1966California Gubernatorial Election, 1962Republican Party (United States)Woodrow WilsonFranklin D. RooseveltLyndon B. JohnsonPresident Of The United StatesUnited States CongressRonald ReaganUnited States Presidential Election In California, 1984Donald H. ClausenCloverdale, CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaList Of School Districts In Sonoma County, CaliforniaEmpire CollegeGolden Gate UniversityWalnut Creek, CaliforniaSanta Rosa Junior CollegeSonoma State UniversityUniversity Of Northern California (Santa Rosa)University Of San FranciscoSonoma County LibraryEnlargeA-26 InvaderPacific Coast Air MuseumCharles M. Schulz Sonoma County AirportHollywoodIt's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad WorldCharles M. Schulz MuseumSonoma County MuseumLuther Burbank Home And GardensWikipedia:Link RotWikipedia:Link RotEnlargeCalifornia Coastal PrairieSonoma Coast State ParkJenner, CaliforniaEnlargeTolay Lake Regional ParkSafari WestSonoma Coast State BeachGoat Rock BeachBodega BayFort RossLuther BurbankLuther Burbank Home And GardensLuther BurbankLuther Burbank's Gold Ridge Experiment FarmQuarryhill Botanic GardenLake SonomaTolay LakeJack London State Historic ParkGlen Ellen, CaliforniaRancho Petaluma AdobeMission San Francisco SolanoArmstrong Redwoods State ReserveStillwater CoveSonoma TrainTown RailroadEnlargeEnlargeCloverdale, CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaBloomfield, CaliforniaBodega, CaliforniaBodega Bay, CaliforniaBoyes Hot Springs, CaliforniaCarmet, CaliforniaCazadero, CaliforniaEl Verano, CaliforniaEldridge, CaliforniaFetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente, CaliforniaForestville, CaliforniaFulton, CaliforniaGeyserville, CaliforniaGlen Ellen, CaliforniaGraton, CaliforniaGuerneville, CaliforniaJenner, CaliforniaKenwood, CaliforniaLarkfield-Wikiup, CaliforniaMonte Rio, CaliforniaOccidental, CaliforniaPenngrove, CaliforniaRoseland, CaliforniaSalmon Creek, CaliforniaSea Ranch, CaliforniaSereno Del Mar, CaliforniaTemelec, CaliforniaTimber Cove, CaliforniaValley Ford, CaliforniaAnnapolis, CaliforniaAsti, CaliforniaCamp Meeker, CaliforniaCarnerosDuncans Mills, CaliforniaFreestone, CaliforniaThe GeysersGuernewood Park, CaliforniaHacienda, Sonoma County, CaliforniaKorbel, Sonoma County, CaliforniaLakeville, CaliforniaMark West, CaliforniaMark West SpringsMercuryville, CaliforniaMesa Grande, CaliforniaRio Dell, Sonoma County, CaliforniaRio Nido, CaliforniaSchellville, CaliforniaStewarts Point, CaliforniaTwo Rock, CaliforniaVenado, CaliforniaVilla Grande, CaliforniaVineburg, California2010 United States CensusSanta Rosa, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaLarkfield-Wikiup, CaliforniaCloverdale, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaBoyes Hot Springs, CaliforniaRoseland, CaliforniaGuerneville, CaliforniaFetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente, CaliforniaEl Verano, CaliforniaForestville, CaliforniaPenngrove, CaliforniaGraton, CaliforniaTemelec, CaliforniaSea Ranch, CaliforniaEldridge, CaliforniaMonte Rio, CaliforniaOccidental, CaliforniaBodega Bay, CaliforniaKenwood, CaliforniaGeyserville, CaliforniaGlen Ellen, CaliforniaFulton, CaliforniaCazadero, CaliforniaBloomfield, CaliforniaBodega, CaliforniaTimber Cove, CaliforniaValley Ford, CaliforniaJenner, CaliforniaSereno Del Mar, CaliforniaSalmon Creek, CaliforniaKashia Band Of Pomo Indians Of The Stewarts Point RancheriaAIAN (U.S. Census)Carmet, CaliforniaFilm Locations In Sonoma County, CaliforniaEnlargeIt's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad WorldPacific Coast Air MuseumCharles M. Schulz Sonoma County AirportMotion PictureBroncho Billy AndersonCinematographyThe Farmer's Daughter (1947 Film)Joseph CottenLoretta YoungAlfred HitchcockShadow Of A DoubtThe Birds (film)American GraffitiThe Third DayPeggy Sue Got MarriedSanta Rosa High School (Santa Rosa, California)The Man Who Wasn't There (2001 Film)Bandits (2001 Film)Many Rivers To CrossSo I Married An Axe MurdererShoot The MoonWolf HouseAmerican GraffitiHeroes (1977 Film)Holiday Inn (film)It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad WorldCharles M. Schulz Sonoma County AirportThieves' HighwayTucker: The Man And His DreamScream (1996 Film)Sonoma Valley Film FestivalPortal:San Francisco Bay AreaList Of Sonoma County Regional Parks FacilitiesNational Register Of Historic Places Listings In Sonoma County, CaliforniaSonoma County Water AgencyProgressive Party (United States, 1912)Theodore RooseveltSocialist Party Of AmericaEugene V. DebsProhibition PartyEugene W. ChafinUnited States Census BureauInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0-520-21316-5Alfred L. KroeberUnited States Census BureauKGO-TVWayback MachineWayback MachineWayback MachineWayback MachineWayback MachineWayback MachineWayback MachineWayback MachineUnited States Census BureauUnited States Census BureauUnited States Office Of Management And BudgetComma-separated ValuesUnited States Census BureauComma-separated ValuesUnited States Census BureauWikipedia:Link RotInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0786422173Local Agency Formation CommissionOCLCInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0937862754OCLCOCLCInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/9780403098705OCLCCategory:CS1 Maint: Extra Text: Authors ListOCLCOCLCOCLCOCLCInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/9780743247511OCLCOCLCOCLCOCLCOCLCOCLCDMOZMendocino County, CaliforniaLake County, CaliforniaNapa County, CaliforniaMarin County, CaliforniaSolano County, CaliforniaTemplate:Sonoma County, CaliforniaTemplate Talk:Sonoma County, CaliforniaCounty SeatSanta Rosa, CaliforniaList Of Municipalities In CaliforniaCloverdale, CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceBloomfield, CaliforniaBodega, CaliforniaBodega Bay, CaliforniaBoyes Hot Springs, CaliforniaCarmet, CaliforniaCazadero, CaliforniaEl Verano, CaliforniaEldridge, CaliforniaFetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente, CaliforniaForestville, CaliforniaFulton, CaliforniaGeyserville, CaliforniaGlen Ellen, CaliforniaGraton, CaliforniaGuerneville, CaliforniaJenner, CaliforniaKenwood, CaliforniaLarkfield-Wikiup, CaliforniaMonte Rio, CaliforniaOccidental, CaliforniaPenngrove, CaliforniaRoseland, CaliforniaSalmon Creek, CaliforniaSea Ranch, CaliforniaSereno Del Mar, CaliforniaTemelec, CaliforniaTimber Cove, CaliforniaValley Ford, CaliforniaUnincorporated AreaAnnapolis, CaliforniaAsti, CaliforniaCamp Meeker, CaliforniaDuncans Mills, CaliforniaFort Ross, CaliforniaFreestone, CaliforniaGuernewood Park, CaliforniaHacienda, Sonoma County, CaliforniaKorbel, Sonoma County, CaliforniaLakeville, CaliforniaMark West, CaliforniaMark West Springs, CaliforniaRio Dell, Sonoma County, CaliforniaRio Nido, CaliforniaSchellville, CaliforniaStewarts Point, CaliforniaTwo Rock, CaliforniaVenado, CaliforniaVilla Grande, CaliforniaVineburg, CaliforniaIndian ReservationDry Creek RancheriaGraton RancheriaKashia Band Of Pomo Indians Of The Stewarts Point RancheriaTemplate:North BayTemplate Talk:North BayNorth Bay (San Francisco Bay Area)Marin County, CaliforniaNapa County, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaNapa, CaliforniaNovato, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaSan Rafael, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaAmerican Canyon, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaLarkspur, CaliforniaMill Valley, CaliforniaSan Anselmo, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaTamalpais-Homestead Valley, CaliforniaBelvedere, CaliforniaBlack Point-Green Point, CaliforniaBodega Bay, CaliforniaBolinas, CaliforniaBoyes Hot Springs, CaliforniaCalistoga, CaliforniaCloverdale, CaliforniaCorte Madera, CaliforniaCotati, CaliforniaDeer Park, CaliforniaDillon Beach, CaliforniaEldridge, CaliforniaElmira, CaliforniaEl Verano, CaliforniaFairfax, CaliforniaFetters Hot Springs-Agua Caliente, CaliforniaForestville, CaliforniaFulton, CaliforniaGeyserville, CaliforniaGlen Ellen, CaliforniaGraton, CaliforniaGuerneville, CaliforniaInverness, CaliforniaKentfield, CaliforniaKenwood, CaliforniaLagunitas-Forest Knolls, CaliforniaLarkfield-Wikiup, CaliforniaLucas Valley-Marinwood, CaliforniaMarin City, CaliforniaMonte Rio, CaliforniaMuir Beach, CaliforniaOccidental, CaliforniaPenngrove, CaliforniaPoint Reyes Station, CaliforniaRoseland, CaliforniaRoss, CaliforniaSan Geronimo, CaliforniaSanta Venetia, CaliforniaSausalito, CaliforniaSea Ranch, CaliforniaSebastopol, CaliforniaSt. Helena, CaliforniaStinson Beach, CaliforniaStrawberry, Marin County, CaliforniaTemelec, CaliforniaTiburon, CaliforniaTomales, CaliforniaWoodacre, CaliforniaYountville, CaliforniaTemplate:SF Bay AreaTemplate Talk:SF Bay AreaSan Francisco Bay AreaBodega BayCarquinez StraitClifton Court ForebayGolden GateGrizzly BayGuadalupe River (California)Half Moon Bay (California)Lake BerryessaNapa RiverOakland EstuaryPetaluma RiverRichardson BayRichmond Inner HarborRussian River (California)Sacramento RiverSan Francisco BaySan Leandro BaySan Pablo BaySonoma CreekSuisun BayTomales BaySan Francisco Bay AreaAlameda County, CaliforniaContra Costa County, CaliforniaMarin County, CaliforniaNapa County, CaliforniaSan FranciscoSan Mateo County, CaliforniaSanta Clara County, CaliforniaSolano County, CaliforniaSan Jose, CaliforniaSan FranciscoOakland, CaliforniaAntioch, CaliforniaBerkeley, CaliforniaConcord, CaliforniaDaly City, CaliforniaFairfield, CaliforniaFremont, CaliforniaHayward, CaliforniaRichmond, CaliforniaSanta Clara, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaSunnyvale, CaliforniaVallejo, CaliforniaAlameda, CaliforniaBrentwood, CaliforniaCastro Valley, CaliforniaCupertino, CaliforniaLivermore, CaliforniaMilpitas, CaliforniaMountain View, CaliforniaNapa, CaliforniaNovato, CaliforniaPalo Alto, CaliforniaPetaluma, CaliforniaPittsburg, CaliforniaPleasanton, CaliforniaRedwood City, CaliforniaSan Leandro, CaliforniaSan Mateo, CaliforniaSan Rafael, CaliforniaSan Ramon, CaliforniaSouth San Francisco, CaliforniaUnion City, CaliforniaVacaville, CaliforniaWalnut Creek, CaliforniaBelmont, CaliforniaBenicia, CaliforniaBurlingame, CaliforniaCampbell, CaliforniaDanville, CaliforniaDublin, CaliforniaEast Palo Alto, CaliforniaFoster City, CaliforniaGilroy, CaliforniaLos Altos, CaliforniaLos Gatos, CaliforniaMartinez, CaliforniaMenlo Park, CaliforniaMorgan Hill, CaliforniaNewark, CaliforniaOakley, CaliforniaPacifica, CaliforniaPleasant Hill, CaliforniaRohnert Park, CaliforniaSan Bruno, CaliforniaSan Carlos, CaliforniaSan Pablo, CaliforniaSaratoga, CaliforniaSuisun City, CaliforniaWindsor, CaliforniaAlamo, CaliforniaAlbany, CaliforniaAmerican Canyon, CaliforniaAshland, CaliforniaBay Point, CaliforniaCherryland, CaliforniaClayton, CaliforniaDiscovery Bay, CaliforniaDixon, CaliforniaEl Cerrito, CaliforniaEl Sobrante, CaliforniaEmeryville, CaliforniaFairview, CaliforniaHalf Moon Bay, CaliforniaHealdsburg, CaliforniaHercules, CaliforniaHillsborough, CaliforniaLafayette, CaliforniaLarkspur, CaliforniaMillbrae, CaliforniaMill Valley, CaliforniaMoraga, CaliforniaNorth Fair Oaks, CaliforniaOrinda, CaliforniaPiedmont, CaliforniaPinole, CaliforniaSan Anselmo, CaliforniaSan Lorenzo, CaliforniaSonoma, CaliforniaStanford, CaliforniaTamalpais-Homestead Valley, CaliforniaEast Bay (San Francisco Bay Area)North Bay (San Francisco Bay Area)San Francisco PeninsulaSilicon ValleySanta Clara ValleyPolitics In The San Francisco Bay AreaSports In The San Francisco Bay AreaTransportation In The San Francisco Bay AreaTemplate:CaliforniaTemplate Talk:CaliforniaU.S. StateCaliforniaSacramento, CaliforniaOutline Of 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Jose, CaliforniaSan FranciscoFresno, CaliforniaSacramento, CaliforniaLong Beach, CaliforniaOakland, CaliforniaBakersfield, CaliforniaAnaheim, CaliforniaHelp:Authority ControlVirtual International Authority FileIntegrated Authority FileHelp:CategoryCategory:1850 Establishments In CaliforniaCategory:Populated Places Established In 1850Category:California WineCategory:Sonoma County, CaliforniaCategory:Counties In The San Francisco Bay AreaCategory:California CountiesCategory:Webarchive Template Wayback LinksCategory:All Articles With Dead External LinksCategory:Articles With Dead External Links From July 2014Category:Use Mdy Dates From October 2014Category:Coordinates On WikidataCategory:All Articles With Unsourced StatementsCategory:Articles With Unsourced Statements From February 2015Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From March 2010Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From May 2013Category:Articles With Dead External Links From July 2017Category:Articles With 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