Contents 1 History 2 Overview 3 Holidays most commonly celebrated 4 Holidays observed with paid time off 4.1 Holiday listing as paid time off 4.2 School holidays 4.3 Government sector holidays: Federal, state, and local government 4.3.1 Federally regulated agencies: Banks and financial institutions 4.3.2 Legal holidays by states and political divisions of the United States 4.3.2.1 Alabama 4.3.2.1.1 Baldwin County, Alabama 4.3.2.1.2 Mobile County, Alabama 4.3.2.1.3 Perry County, Alabama 4.3.2.2 Alaska 4.3.2.3 American Samoa 4.3.2.4 Arizona 4.3.2.5 Arkansas 4.3.2.6 California 4.3.2.6.1 California education holidays 4.3.2.6.2 Berkeley, California 4.3.2.6.3 San Francisco, California 4.3.2.6.4 West Hollywood, California 4.3.2.7 Colorado 4.3.2.8 Connecticut 4.3.2.9 Delaware 4.3.2.10 District of Columbia 4.3.2.11 Florida 4.3.2.11.1 Florida legal holidays 4.3.2.11.2 Florida circuit courts 4.3.2.11.3 Miami-Dade, Florida 4.3.2.12 Georgia 4.3.2.13 Guam 4.3.2.14 Hawaii 4.3.2.15 Idaho 4.3.2.16 Illinois 4.3.2.16.1 Chicago, Illinois 4.3.2.17 Indiana 4.3.2.18 Iowa 4.3.2.19 Kansas 4.3.2.20 Kentucky 4.3.2.21 Louisiana 4.3.2.21.1 Louisiana courts 4.3.2.21.2 Baton Rouge, Louisiana 4.3.2.22 Maine 4.3.2.23 Maryland 4.3.2.24 Massachusetts 4.3.2.24.1 Suffolk County, Massachusetts 4.3.2.25 Michigan 4.3.2.26 Minnesota 4.3.2.27 Mississippi 4.3.2.28 Missouri 4.3.2.29 Montana 4.3.2.30 Nebraska 4.3.2.31 Nevada 4.3.2.32 New Hampshire 4.3.2.33 New Jersey 4.3.2.34 New Mexico 4.3.2.35 New York 4.3.2.35.1 New York City Public Schools 4.3.2.36 North Carolina 4.3.2.37 North Dakota 4.3.2.38 Northern Mariana Islands 4.3.2.39 Ohio 4.3.2.40 Oklahoma 4.3.2.41 Oregon 4.3.2.42 Pennsylvania 4.3.2.43 Puerto Rico 4.3.2.44 Rhode Island 4.3.2.45 South Carolina 4.3.2.46 South Dakota 4.3.2.47 Tennessee 4.3.2.48 Texas 4.3.2.48.1 Texas partial staffing holidays 4.3.2.48.2 Texas optional holidays 4.3.2.49 U.S. Virgin Islands 4.3.2.50 Utah 4.3.2.51 Vermont 4.3.2.52 Virginia 4.3.2.53 Wake Island 4.3.2.54 Washington 4.3.2.55 West Virginia 4.3.2.56 Wisconsin 4.3.2.56.1 Wisconsin Public School Observance Days 4.3.2.57 Wyoming 4.3.2.58 Federal holidays at the state level 4.3.2.59 Legal holidays observed nationwide 5 Holidays with religious, cultural or historical significance 5.1 Confederate States of America 5.2 Drinking holidays 5.3 African American holidays 5.4 Christian holidays 5.5 Hindu holidays 5.6 Jewish holidays 5.7 Islamic holidays 5.8 Other religious, traditional, and informal holidays celebrated in the United States 6 Other notable holidays 7 See also 8 References 9 External links


History[edit] Public holidays had their origins from established federal holidays that were enacted by Congress. They were typically observed on days that have significance for various sectors of American society and are observed at all levels of society including government, the private sector, and are typically derived from the history, religion and the cultures of the U.S. demographics and have changed over time. Observances of holidays are most commonly observed with paid time off, however, many holiday celebrations are done with festivities without time off. Some are observed with community work depending on the meaning of the holiday. They are however not mandated by any government, agencies, whether it be federal, state, or local governments. There are no national holidays on which all businesses are closed by law. Federal holidays are only established for certain federally chartered and regulated businesses (such as federal banks), and for Washington, D.C. All other public holidays are created by the States; most states also allow local jurisdictions (cities, villages, etc.) to establish their own local holidays. As a result, holidays have not historically been governed at the federal level and federal law does not govern business opening. Some states restrict some business activities on some holidays.[1] Business closures are mandated on some holidays in some states for certain kinds of businesses by Blue Laws. For example, some businesses cannot open on Thanksgiving Day in some New England states if the businesses operated on more than 5000 square feet of space. The most notable businesses to close on such occasions are car dealerships and establishments selling alcohol.


Overview[edit] As of 2012[update], there were eleven federal holidays in the United States, ten annual holidays and one quadrennial holiday (Inauguration Day).[2] Pursuant to the Uniform Monday Holiday Act of 1968 (effective 1971), official holidays are observed on a Monday, except for New Year's Day, Independence Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.[3] Saint Patrick's Day parade in Atlanta, 2012 Cinco de Mayo dancers greeted by U.S. President George W. Bush While all current federal holidays have also been made public holidays in all 50 states for federal organizations, each state is not bound to observe the holidays on the same dates as the federal holidays. Many states also have additional holidays that are not observed by the U.S. federal government.[4] Many businesses likewise observe certain holidays as well, which are also not mandated by any government agency. A list of "recommended diversity holidays" recognizes many cultures that range from Christianity to Islam, as well as racial diversity where various ethnic holidays such as St. Patrick's Day, Kwanzaa, Diwali, Mardi Gras, and Cinco de Mayo are celebrated by individuals in the workplace, as a matter of best practice.[5] In light of recent race issues in the United States, many municipalities both at the city and state levels have begun celebrating Malcolm X Day and Rosa Parks Day in addition to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day to embrace the mostly disenfranchised African American community in the form of festivals and parades if not done as a legal public holiday. Illinois and Berkeley, California are two places where Malcolm X is honored with a legal holiday with offices closed whereas Missouri honored Rosa Parks on her birthday.[6][7] Today, the United States is the 85th most ethnically diverse country in the world. While the popularity of each public holiday cannot easily be measured, the holiday with the highest greeting card sales is Christmas.[8] Major retail establishments such as malls, shopping centers and most retail stores close only on Thanksgiving and Christmas and some on Easter Sunday as well, but remain open on all other holidays (early closing on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve, and sometimes on other major holidays).[9] Virtually all companies observe and close on the major holidays (New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas). Some non-retail business close on the day after Thanksgiving, while some (such as federal banks and post offices) are not allowed to close on the day after Thanksgiving. Some smaller businesses normally open on Sunday will close on Easter Sunday, if it is their experience they will have very few customers that day.[10]


Holidays most commonly celebrated[edit] A jack-o'-lantern, one of the symbols of Halloween Rank Date Holiday  % of Americans celebrating USD sales (in billions)[11] Music symbolic of holiday Remarks 1 December 25 (Fixed) Christmas 92%–96%[12][13][14][15] $630.5 Many Christmas carols and songs, including "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing", "Silent Night", and "Jingle Bells" Christmas celebrations are evidenced by decorations which give off light and exchanging of gifts between family members and friends. Most popular based on greeting card sales. About 6.5 billion cards per year or $8 billion annual sales.[citation needed] Also known for having the second highest church attendance.[16] Major symbols of this holiday are the Christmas tree and Christmas music. Christmas is the celebration of Jesus Christ's birth. 2 November 22–28 (Floating Thursday) Thanksgiving 87%–90%[17][18] (part of Christmas sales) Traditional songs include "We Gather Together", "Come, Ye Thankful People, Come", "For the Beauty of the Earth" One sixth of all turkeys eaten annually happens around Thanksgiving.[19] Holiday accounts for 46 million turkeys, compared with 22 million consumed on Christmas and 19 million on Easter.[20] Reduced turkey prices usually occur around Thanksgiving.[21] 3 May 8–14 (Floating Sunday) Mother's Day 84%[22][23] $19.9 Known for having the strongest restaurant sales, even compared with Valentine's Day.[24] It is also known for high church attendance after Easter and Christmas.[16] 4 March 22 – April 25 (Floating Sunday) Easter 80%–81%[25][26] $16.4 Many Christian hymns Highest church attendance happens on Easter.[16] 5 July 4 (Fixed) Independence Day (Fourth of July) 78%–79%[27] $68.0 (Part of Back to School sales) Many American patriotic songs, including "The Star-Spangled Banner", "America the Beautiful", and "Yankee Doodle" Holiday is best known for fireworks and barbecues. 45% of American celebrate the 4th of July with fireworks, accounting for about $675 million in fireworks sales.[28] 6 June 15–21 (Floating Sunday) Father's Day 75%[29] $12.7 Holiday accounts for the highest sales of ties and neck wear annually, around $12.7 billion.[30] 7 October 31 (Fixed) Halloween 64%–65%[31][32] $6.9 A few songs, including "Monster Mash", "Thriller (song) and "This Is Halloween" Halloween celebrations are evidenced by children knocking door to door asking for treats, and costumed adolescents playing tricks on various households. Most popular based on candy sales, amounting to $2.6 billion in 2015.[33] Sales of $6.9 billion in 2015 includes candy, costumes, and pumpkin sales, all of which are directly attributed to this holiday.[34] 8 February 14 (Fixed) Valentine's Day 55%[35] $18.9 Holiday accounts for 224 million roses grown for the holiday. 24% of American adults purchased flowers for Valentine's Day in 2015.[36] Holiday comes in second in terms of annual restaurant sales.[24] 9 March 17 (Fixed) Saint Patrick's Day 51%[37] $4.4 Irish pub songs, such as "The Wild Rover" 10 December 31 (Fixed) New Year's Day (New Year's Eve) 37%–45%[38][39][40] (Part of Christmas sales) A few songs, including "Auld Lang Syne" Known for being the most drunk holiday.[41] This is evidenced by the spike in sales around "the holidays", which usually happens between Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.[42]


Holidays observed with paid time off[edit] The labor force in the United States comprises about 62% (as of 2014) of the general population.[43] In the United States, 97% of the private sector businesses determine what days this sector of the population gets paid time off, according to a study by the Society for Human Resource Management. The following holidays are observed by the majority of the U.S. businesses with paid time off: The 1979 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade New Year's Day and New Year's Eve[44] Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Thanksgiving and the day after Christmas Eve and Christmas Holiday listing as paid time off[edit] A barrel-shaped barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. Pans on the top shelf hold hamburgers and hot dogs that were grilled earlier when the coals were hot. The lower grill is now being used to cook pork ribs and "drunken chicken" slow, typical on a worker's paid holiday - see Barbecue in the United States. This list of holidays is based off the official list of Federal Holidays by Year from the U.S. Government. The holidays however are at the discretion of employers whose statistics are measured by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Another list from the Society for Human Resource Management shows actual percentages of employers offering paid time off for each holiday. The term "major holiday" (bolded) coincides for those holidays that 90% or more of employers offered paid time off.[45] Date *Official name Percentage of Americans celebrating **Percentage of businesses offering paid time off[46] Remarks January 1 (fixed) New Year's Day[47] 72%[48] 96% Celebrates beginning of the Gregorian calendar year. Festivities include counting down to 12:00 midnight on the preceding night, New Year's Eve, often with fireworks display and party. The ball drop at Times Square in New York City has become a national New Year's festivity. Traditional end of Christmas and holiday season.[49] January 15–21 (floating Monday) Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. 26%[50] 34–38% Honors Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights leader, who was actually born on January 15, 1929; combined with other holidays in several states. Some cities and municipalities hold parades; and more recently, the 1994 King Holiday and Service Act, which was passed to encourage Americans to transform the King Holiday into a day of citizen action volunteer service, has gained in popularity (sometimes referred to as a National Day of Service). January 20 or 21 Inauguration Day N/A 0% Celebrates the United States presidential inauguration, every 4 years. While this is a federal holiday, this is not a "public holiday". Only Washington, D.C.. observes this day besides the federal government.[51] February 15–21 (floating Monday) Washington's Birthday 52%[52] 34–35% Washington's Birthday was first declared a federal holiday by an 1879 act of Congress. The Uniform Holidays Act, 1968, shifted the date of the commemoration of Washington's Birthday from February 22 to the third Monday in February (between February 15 and 21, meaning the observed holiday never falls on Washington's actual birthday). Because of this, combined with the fact that President Lincoln's birthday falls on February 12, many people now refer to this holiday as "Presidents' Day" and consider it a day honoring all American presidents. However, neither the Uniform Holidays Act nor any subsequent law changed the name of the holiday from Washington's Birthday to Presidents' Day.[53] May 25–31 (floating Monday) Memorial Day 21%[54] 95% Honors the nation's war dead from the Civil War onwards; marks the unofficial beginning of the summer season (traditionally May 30, shifted by the Uniform Holidays Act 1968). July 4 (fixed) Independence Day 79% 97% Celebrates the signing of the Declaration of Independence from British rule, also called the Fourth of July or simply "The Fourth". Fireworks celebration are held in many cities throughout the nation. Boston, Massachusetts is famous for its "Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular" with music and fireworks September 1–7 (floating Monday) Labor Day 53%[55][56] 95% Celebrates the achievements of workers and the labor movement; marks the unofficial end of the summer season. October 8–14 (floating Monday) Columbus Day 8%[57] 13–16% Honors Christopher Columbus, the first European to land in mainland Americas after Leif Erikson. In Berkeley, CA this day is observed as Indigenous People's Day, in honor of the Native Americans who lived in the Americas long before Columbus "discovered" the area. November 11 (fixed) Veterans Day 43%[58] 16–21% Honors all veterans of the United States armed forces. It is observed on November 11 to recall the end of World War I on that date in 1918 (major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour (GMT +1) of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 when the Armistice with Germany went into effect). November 22–28 (floating Thursday) Thanksgiving Day 87%[17] 97% Traditionally celebrates the giving of thanks for the autumn harvest. Traditionally includes the sharing of a turkey dinner. December 25 (fixed) Christmas 90%–95%[12][59] 94% The most widely celebrated holiday of the Christian year, Christmas is observed as a commemoration of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. * List of Federal Holidays by Year from the U.S. Government[60] (see Office of Personnel Management) ** Additional holidays referenced by the Society for Human Resource Management: Good Friday 26%, Easter Monday 6%, Yom Kippur 7%, Day before Thanksgiving 3–8%, Day after Thanksgiving 69–75%, Day before Christmas Eve 33%, Christmas Eve 78–79%, Day after Christmas 40–64%, Day before New Years Eve 25–71% depending if it falls on a weekend, New Years Eve 71%, Passover 3%, Hanukkah 1%, Ramadan 1%, Ash Wednesday 1%, Diwali 1%, Eid al-Adha 1%, Vietnamese New Year <1%, Chinese New Year <1% School holidays[edit] Main article: School holidays in the United States Fort Lauderdale Beach is a typical warm weather destination for students taking a spring break. An academic year typically spans from early fall to early summer, with two or three months of summer vacation marking the end of year. K-12 public schools generally observe local, state, and federal holidays, plus additional days off around Thanksgiving, the period from before Christmas until after New Year's Day, a spring break (usually a week in April) and sometimes a winter break (a week in February or March). Two or three days per year are sometimes devoted to professional development for teachers, and students have the day off. Most colleges and universities divide the school year into two semesters. The fall semester often begins the day after Labor Day in early September and runs until mid-December. The spring semester typically starts in the middle or end of January and runs until May. Winter and summer classes might be offered in January and May–August. Major federal, state, and local holidays are often observed, including the day after and usually before Thanksgiving. Spring break is usually a week in March or early April, and in college party culture traditionally involves a warm-weather trip. Unscheduled weather-related cancellations and emergency cancellations can also affect school calendars. When taking summer school or summer camp schedules into account, the Independence Day holiday on July 4 is usually a scheduled holiday observance for which the summer program closes. Government sector holidays: Federal, state, and local government[edit] Main article: Federal holidays in the United States The federal government sector labor force consisted of about 2,729,000 (as of 2014) of the total labor force of 150,539,900, which is roughly about 1.8% of the total labor force or about 1.1% of the total population. In addition, state and local governments consist of another 19,134,000 bringing the U.S. total government sector employees to about 15% of the total labor force.[61] This sector of the population is entitled to paid time off designated as Federal holidays by Congress in Title V of the United States Code (5 U.S.C. § 6103). Both federal and state government employees generally observe the same federal holidays. Federally regulated agencies: Banks and financial institutions[edit] U.S. banks generally observe the federal holidays because of their reliance on the U.S. Federal Reserve for certain activities such as wire transfers and Automated Clearing House (ACH) transactions.[62] For example, JP Morgan Chase observes all federal holidays except Columbus Day,[63] while U.S. Bank observes all of them.[64] The New York Stock Exchange also closely follows the federal holidays except for Columbus Day. However, the agency also has extra holidays on the day before Independence Day and Good Friday. Legal holidays by states and political divisions of the United States[edit] See also: Category:State holidays in the United States and Category:Public holidays in territories of the United States Not to be confused with tax holidays In general, most state governments observe the same holidays that the federal government observes. However, while that is true for most states, every state includes and omits holidays to fit the culture relevant to its population. Holiday Number of U.S. states observed with government offices closed Remarks New Year's Day Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Veterans Day Thanksgiving Day Christmas Day 50 These holidays are unanimously observed by the state governments of all 50 states. Martin Luther King Jr. Day 45 Signed into law in 1983, but not observed by all states until 2000, with Utah officially observing as a paid state holiday. Five states observe this day using alternate name "Civil Rights Day" or holiday is combined to also honor Robert E. Lee. Washington's Birthday (Presidents' Day) 38[65] Alternatively observed separately as George Washington's or Lincoln's Birthday. Columbus Day 23[66] Fewer than half the states recognize Columbus Day. Day after Thanksgiving 18[67] Observed by Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia. Good Friday 12[67] Observed by Connecticut, Delaware, Guam, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Puerto Rico, and Tennessee. Christmas Eve 11 Observed by Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin Election Day 10 Observed by Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island Day after Christmas 6[67][68] Observed by Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and the US Virgin Islands. Lincoln's Birthday 5[67] Observed by Connecticut, Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, and New York New Year's Eve 4 Observed by Kentucky, Michigan, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. Alabama[edit] See also: State of Alabama Legal Holidays Confederate Memorial Day observance in Alabama All federal holidays[69][70] January 15–21 (floating Monday) – this federal holiday is renamed "Robert E. Lee/Martin Luther King Birthday" February 15–21 (floating Monday) – this federal holiday is renamed "George Washington/Thomas Jefferson Birthday" April 22–28 (floating Monday) – Confederate Memorial Day June 1–7 (floating Monday) – Jefferson Davis' birthday October 8–14 (floating Monday) – Renamed Columbus Day / Fraternal Day / American Indian Heritage Day Baldwin County, Alabama[edit] All Alabama state holidays February 3-March 9 (floating Tuesday using Computus) - Mardi Gras Mobile County, Alabama[edit] All Alabama state holidays February 3-March 9 (floating Tuesday using Computus) - Mardi Gras Perry County, Alabama[edit] See also: Perry County, Alabama Calendar All Alabama state holidays November 8–14 (floating Monday) - Obama Day Alaska[edit] See also: Alaska State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day[71] March 25–31 (floating Monday) - Seward's Day October 18 - Alaska Day American Samoa[edit] See also: American Samoa Holidays All federal holidays April 17 - Flag Day December 26 - Family Day Arizona[edit] See also:Arizona State Holidays All federal holidays[72] January 15–21 (floating Monday) - this federal holiday is renamed "Dr. Martin Luther King Jr./Civil Rights Day". February 15–21 (floating Monday) - this federal holiday is renamed "Lincoln/Washington Presidents' Day". Arkansas[edit] See also: Arkansas State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day[73] February 15–21 (floating Monday) - this federal holiday is renamed "George Washington's Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day". December 24 - Christmas Eve California[edit] See also: California Department of Human Resources - State Holidays The U.S. state of California has separate definitions of "state holidays" which are different from "legal holidays". All federal holidays except Columbus Day[74] March 31 (fixed) - César Chávez Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - day after Thanksgiving César Chávez Day poster California education holidays[edit] See also: California Education Code 37220-37223 All California state holidays (schools closed) January 23 - Ed Roberts Day (schools open, but with related instructions) January 30 - Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties (schools open, but with related instructions) February 6 - Ronald Reagan Day (schools open, but with related instructions) February 12 - Lincoln's Birthday (schools closed) February 15 - Susan B. Anthony Day (schools open, but with related instructions) March 5 - death of Crispus Attucks (schools open, but with related instructions) March 7 - birthday of Luther Burbank / Arbor Day (schools open, but with related instructions) March 30 - Vietnamese Veterans Day (schools open, but with related instructions) April 6 - California Poppy Day (schools open, but with related instructions) April 21 - John Muir Day (schools open, but with related instructions) May 8–14 (floating Wednesday) - Day of the Teacher (schools open, but with related instructions) May 22 - Harvey Milk Day (schools open, but with related instructions) September 22–28 (floating Monday) - Native American Day (schools closed) October 25 - Larry Itliong Day (schools open, but with related instructions) Lincoln's Birthday (February 12) was removed from California's education holiday calendar in 2009.[75] Berkeley, California[edit] See also: City of Berkeley: Holiday and Reduced Service Days Schedule All California holidays except Cesar Chavez Day February 12 (fixed) - Lincoln's Birthday May 19 (fixed) - Malcolm X Day October 8–14 (floating Monday) - Indigenous People's Day San Francisco, California[edit] See also: San Francisco City and County Holidays All California holidays except Cesar Chavez Day October 8–14 (floating Monday) - Columbus Day (added because the holiday was omitted by the California state government) West Hollywood, California[edit] See also: West Hollywood City Holidays Harvey Milk Day is observed in West Hollywood, California. All California holidays except Cesar Chavez Day and the Day after Thanksgiving May 22 (fixed) - Harvey Milk Day Colorado[edit] See also: Colorado State Holidays All federal holidays[76] Connecticut[edit] See also: Connecticut Department of Administrative Services State Holidays All federal holidays[77] February 12 - Lincoln's Birthday March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday Delaware[edit] See also State of Delaware - State Holidays All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday and Columbus Day[78] March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day (in even-numbered years) November 23–29 (floating Friday) - day After Thanksgiving District of Columbia[edit] See also: District of Columbia Department of Human Resources Holidays All federal holidays[79] January 20 - Inauguration Day (every 4 years) April 16 - Emancipation Day Florida[edit] See also: Florida State Holidays Chapter 110 Section 117 Florida's laws separately defines "paid holidays" versus "legal holidays", which does not have any obligation to include as "paid holidays". As of 2015, multiple states observe Susan B. Anthony Day. Florida is the only state that actually observes the day as a legal holiday, though state offices remain open. Currently, no federal holiday honors a woman in the United States. All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday and Columbus Day[80] November 23–29 (floating Friday) - day after Thanksgiving Florida legal holidays[edit] See also: [4] Florida's laws separate the definitions between paid versus legal holidays. The following list shows only the legal holidays that were not defined as "paid holidays": All Florida state holidays January 18 - Martin Luther King Jr. February 3-March 9 (floating Tuesday using Computus) - Shrove Tuesday / Mardi Gras February 12 - Lincoln's Birthday February 15 - Susan B. Anthony Day February 15–21 (floating Monday) - Washington's Birthday (reincluded because the holiday is not listed under the Florida government holidays) March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday April 2 - Pascua Florida Day April 26 - Confederate Memorial Day June 3 - birthday of Jefferson Davis June 14 - Flag Day October 8–14 (floating Monday) - renamed holiday as Columbus and Farmers' Day November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day Florida circuit courts[edit] See also: Florida Circuit Court Holidays All Florida state holidays February 15–21 (floating Monday) - Presidents' Day (reincluded because the Florida state government omits this holiday) March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday September 5-October 5 (floating date) - Rosh Hashannah September 14-October 14 (floating date) - Yom Kippur Miami-Dade, Florida[edit] See also: Miami-Dade Government Holidays All Florida state holidays February 15–21 (floating Monday) - Presidents' Day (reincluded because the Florida state government excludes this date) October 8–14 (floating Monday) - Columbus Day (reincluded because the Florida state government excludes this date) Georgia[edit] See also: Georgia State Holidays All federal holidays except President's Day[81] April 24–30 (floating Monday) - Confederate Memorial Day December 24 - Washington's Birthday observed. If December 24 is a Wednesday, then this holiday is observed on Friday December 26. Guam[edit] See also: Guam Government Holidays Main article: Public holidays in Guam All federal holidays March 7 - Guam History and Chamorro Heritage Day July 21 - Liberation Day November 2 - All Souls' Day December 8 - Lady of Camarin Day Hawaii[edit] See also: Hawaii State Government Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day[82] March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday March 26 - Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Day June 11 - Kamehameha Day August 15–21 (floating Friday) - Statehood Day November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day (in even-numbered years) Idaho[edit] See also: Idaho State Holidays All federal holidays[83] January 15–21 (floating Monday) - this federal holiday is renamed "Martin Luther King, Jr.-Idaho Human Rights Day"[84] Illinois[edit] See also: Illinois Department of Central Management Services State Holidays Illinois is the first state to declare Malcolm X Day a holiday only in 2015. Today, the holiday is only official in Berkeley, California since 1979 with city offices closed. All federal holidays[85] February 12 - Lincoln's Birthday November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day (in even-numbered years) November 23–29 (floating Friday) - day after Thanksgiving Chicago, Illinois[edit] See also: Chicago City Holidays All Illinois state holidays except the Day after Thanksgiving March 1–7 (floating Monday) - Pulaski Day Indiana[edit] See also: Indiana State Personnel State Holidays All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday[86] March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday May 1–7 (floating Monday) - Primary Election Day November 2–8 (floating Monday) - General Election Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Lincoln's Birthday to occur on day after Thanksgiving December 24 - Washington's Birthday to occur on Christmas Eve Iowa[edit] See also: Iowa Department of Administrative Services All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday and Columbus Day[87] November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving Kansas[edit] See also: State of Kansas Employee Service Center All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday and Columbus Day[88][89] Kentucky[edit] See also: State Holidays Kentucky Personnel Cabinet All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday and Columbus Day[90] March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday(half holiday) November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving December 24 - Christmas Eve December 31 - New Year's Eve Louisiana[edit] See also: Louisiana State Holidays Mardi Gras is celebrated in New Orleans. All federal holidays except Columbus Day[91] February 3-March 9 (floating Tuesday using Computus) - Mardi Gras March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day (in even-numbered years) Louisiana courts[edit] See also: Louisiana Court Holidays All Louisiana state holidays November 1 - All Saints' Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving December 24 - Christmas Eve December 31 - New Year's Eve Baton Rouge, Louisiana[edit] All Louisiana state holidays January 20 - Inauguration Day (every four years) Maine[edit] See also: Maine Public Holidays All federal holidays April 15–21 (floating Monday) - Patriots' Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving Maryland[edit] See also: Maryland State Employee Holidays All federal holidays November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Presidential Election Day (every 4 years) November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Native American Heritage Day Massachusetts[edit] See also: Massachusetts Legal Holidays All federal holidays April 15–21 (floating Monday) - Patriots' Day Suffolk County, Massachusetts[edit] All Massachusetts state holidays March 17 - Evacuation Day June 17 - Bunker Hill Day Michigan[edit] See also: Michigan State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - General Election Day (even numbered years only) November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving December 24 - Christmas Eve (if Christmas Eve falls on Sunday as it does in 2017, December 22 is the observed holiday) December 31 - New Year's Eve (if New Year's Eve falls on Sunday as it does in 2017, December 29 is the observed holiday) Minnesota[edit] See also: Minnesota Court Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving Mississippi[edit] See also: Mississippi State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day[92] January 15–21 (floating Monday) - this federal holiday is renamed "Martin Luther King's and Robert E. Lee's Birthdays" April 24–30 (floating Monday) - Confederate Memorial Day May 25–31 (floating Monday) - renamed National Memorial Day / Jefferson Davis Birthday November 11 - renamed Armistice Day (Veterans Day) Missouri[edit] See also: Missouri State Holidays All federal holidays February 12 - Lincoln's Birthday May 8 - Truman Day Montana[edit] See also: Montana State Holidays All federal holidays November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - General Election Day Nebraska[edit] See also: Nebraska Health and Human Services State Holidays Arbor Day tree planting All federal holidays April 24–30 (floating Friday) - Arbor Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving Nevada[edit] See also: Nevada State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day. October 25–31 (floating Friday) - Nevada Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Family Day New Hampshire[edit] See also: New Hampshire State Holidays New Hampshire is one of a few states which does not honor Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with its official national federal name. All federal holidays (offices remain open on Columbus Day)[93] January 15–21 (floating Monday) - this federal holiday is renamed Martin Luther King, Jr. Civil Rights Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - the day after Thanksgiving New Jersey[edit] Main article: State holidays in New Jersey See also : New Jersey State Holidays All federal holidays March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day New Mexico[edit] See also: New Mexico State Holidays All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday November 23–29 (floating Friday) - holiday in lieu of Presidents' Day New York[edit] Main article: New York State government holidays See also: New York State Holidays All federal holidays[94] February 12 - Lincoln's Birthday November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day New York City Public Schools[edit] See also: New York City School Calendar All New York State holidays and most national school holidays January 21-February 20 (floating on full moon date) - Lunar New Year February - Mid-Winter Recess (includes Lincoln's Birthday and Washington's Birthday) March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday April - Spring Recess July–August - Summer vacation (includes Independence Day) September 5-October 5 (floating date) - Rosh Hashannah September 14-October 14 (floating date) - Yom Kippur December - Winter Recess (includes Christmas and New Years Day) Eid al-Adha (date can vary year-round) - Schools are closed if the holiday falls within the academic year For the 2016-2017 year, Eid al-Adha was observed September 12, 2016 North Carolina[edit] See also: North Carolina Human Resources State Employee Holidays All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday and Columbus Day, plus the following four state holidays:[95] March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day After Thanksgiving December 22–28 (floating days) - Christmas Eve and Day after Christmas (three days sequentially; adjusted if any falls on a weekend) North Dakota[edit] See also: North Dakota State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day Northern Mariana Islands[edit] See also: Northern Mariana Islands Holidays All federal holidays March 24 - Commonwealth Covenant Day March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday November 4 - Citizenship Day December 9 - Constitution Day Ohio[edit] See also: Ohio State Employer Holidays All federal holidays Oklahoma[edit] See also: Oklahoma State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving December 26 - Day after Christmas Oregon[edit] See also: Oregon Legal Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day Pennsylvania[edit] See also: Pennsylvania State Holidays All federal holidays March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving[96] Flag Day is observed in Pennsylvania. Puerto Rico[edit] See also: Puerto Rico Public Holidays Main article: Public holidays in Puerto Rico All federal holidays January 6 - Three Kings Day/Epiphany January 8–14 (floating Monday) - Eugenio María de Hostos Birthday March 22 - Emancipation Day March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday March 22-April 25 (floating Sunday using Computus) - Easter April 15–21 (floating Monday) - José de Diego Birthday May 8–14 (floating Sunday) - Mother's Day June 15–21 (floating Sunday) - Father's Day July 15–21 (floating Monday) - Luis Muñoz Rivera Birthday July 25 - Constitution of Puerto Rico Day July 27 - José Celso Barbosa Birthday November 19 - Discovery of Puerto Rico Day Rhode Island[edit] See also: Rhode Island State Holidays All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday August 8–14 (floating Monday) - Victory Day November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day South Carolina[edit] See also: South Carolina Holiday Leave All federal holidays except Columbus Day May 10 - Confederate Memorial Day November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving December 24 - Christmas Eve December 26 - Day after Christmas South Dakota[edit] See also: Schedule of Office Closures for State-recognized holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day October 8–14 (floating Monday) - Native Americans Day Tennessee[edit] See also: Tennessee State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday December 24 - Christmas Eve Texas[edit] See also: Official Texas State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day. November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Friday after Thanksgiving December 24 - Christmas Eve December 26 - Day after Christmas Texas partial staffing holidays[edit] Texas law designates that the state businesses be "partially staffed" on the following holidays. These holidays can be replaced with an optional holiday per the state employee's choice, but will give up one of these in lieu of the optional holiday. January 19 - Confederate Heroes Day March 2 - Texas Independence Day April 21 - San Jacinto Day June 19 - Emancipation Day in Texas August 27 - Lyndon Baines Johnson Day Texas optional holidays[edit] Texas law allows a state employee to replace a partial staffing holiday with one of the following holidays. On these holidays, the state agency is generally required to stay open with minimum staff. March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday March 31 - Cesar Chavez Day (added in section 662.013, was not one of the original "optional holidays" declared in 1999) September 5-October 5 (floating date) - Rosh Hashanah September 14-October 14 (floating date) - Yom Kippur U.S. Virgin Islands[edit] See also: U.S. Virgin Islands Court Holidays Main article: Public holidays in the United States Virgin Islands All federal holidays January 6 - Three Kings Day March 31 - Transfer Day March 19-April 22 (floating Thursday using Computus) - Holy Thursday March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday March 23-April 26 (floating Monday using Computus) - Easter Monday July 3 - Emancipation Day October 8–14 (floating Monday) - Columbus Day - Virgin Islands-Puerto Rico Friendship Day November 1 - D. Hamilton Jackson Day December 26 - Christmas Second Day Utah[edit] See also: Utah State Holidays All federal holidays July 24 - Pioneer Day Vermont[edit] See also: Vermont State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day March 1–7 (floating Tuesday) - Town Meeting Day August 16 - Bennington Battle Day Virginia[edit] See also: Virginia State Holidays All federal holidays January 12–18 (floating Friday) - Lee–Jackson Day February 15–21 (floating Monday) - this federal holiday is renamed "George Washington Day". November 21–27 (floating Wednesday) - day before Thanksgiving, commencing at noon November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving December 24 - Christmas Eve Wake Island[edit] All federal holidays except Martin Luther King Jr. Day All Friday holidays are celebrated on Saturday and all Monday holidays are celebrated on Tuesday to account for the time zone difference with the states. Weekday holidays such as Thanksgiving are celebrated as they fall.[97] March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) - Good Friday March 22-April 25 (floating Sunday using Computus) - Easter (listed to account for park closing, which normally opens Sundays) April 13–15 - Songkran Festival[98] December 31 - New Year's Eve Washington[edit] See also: Washington State Holidays All federal holidays except Columbus Day West Virginia[edit] See also: West Virginia State Holidays All federal holidays June 20 - West Virginia Day November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) - Election Day / Susan B. Anthony Day (even numbered years only), November 23–29 (floating Friday) - Day after Thanksgiving December 24 - Christmas Eve (See note below) December 31 - New Years Eve (See note below) Note: Christmas Eve and New Years Eve are half day holidays and are not shifted if they fall on Saturday or Sunday. Wisconsin[edit] See also: State of Wisconsin Legal Holidays All federal holidays except Washington's Birthday and Columbus Day December 24 - Christmas Eve December 31 - New Year's Eve January 1 - New Years Day Wisconsin Public School Observance Days[edit] See also: Wisconsin Public School Observance Days Wisconsin's public schools are obligated to observe the 21 days designated by Wisconsin Statute section 118.02 on the designated day unless the day falls on Saturday or Sunday, in which case would move the observance to either the preceding Friday or following Monday. The statutes require the public schools to include instruction relating to the holidays. In this list of holidays, all schools remain open. January 15 - Martin Luther King Jr. Day February 12 - Lincoln's Birthday February 15 - Susan B. Anthony Day February 22 - Washington's Birthday March 4 - Casimir Pulaski Day March 17 - "The Great Hunger" in Ireland April 9 - Prisoners of War Remembrance Day April 13 - American's Creed Day April 19 - Patriots' Day April 22 - Environmental Awareness Day April 29 - Arbor Day June 14 - Robert La Follette Sr. Day September 16 - Mildred Fish Harnack Day September 16 - Wisconsin Day September 17 - Constitution Day September 18 - POW-MIA Recognition Day September 23 - Bullying Awareness Day September 28 - Francis Willard Day October 9 - Leif Erikson Day October 12 - Columbus Day November 11 - Veterans Day Wyoming[edit] See also: Wyoming State Holidays All federal holidays[99] January 15–21 (floating Monday) - renamed Martin Luther King, Jr. / Wyoming Equality Day Federal holidays at the state level[edit] While most federal holidays are observed at the state level, some of these holidays are observed with different names, are observed on different days, or completely not observed in some states of the United States. ^ a. For example, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is known officially as Martin Luther King, Jr./Civil Rights Day in Arizona,[100] and New Hampshire,[101] Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert E. Lee's Birthdays in Arkansas,[102] Birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Florida,[103] and Maryland,[104] Martin Luther King Jr. / Idaho Human Rights Day in Idaho,[105] and Martin Luther King's and Robert E. Lee's Birthdays in Mississippi.[106] ^ b. Washington's Birthday is known officially as President's Day in Alaska,[107] California,[108] Hawaii,[109] Idaho,[105] Maryland,[104] Nebraska,[110] New Hampshire,[101] Tennessee,[111] Washington,[112] West Virginia,[113] and Wyoming,[114] Washington-Lincoln Day in Colorado (CRS 24-11-101),[115] Ohio,[116] Lincoln/Washington/Presidents' Day in Arizona,[100] George Washington's Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day in Arkansas,[102] Presidents' Day in Hawaii,[109] Massachusetts,[117] New Mexico,[118] North Dakota,[119] Oklahoma,[120] South Dakota,[121] Texas,[68] and Vermont,[122] Washington's Birthday/President's Day in Maine,[123] Presidents Day in Michigan,[124] Minnesota,[125] Nevada,[126] New Jersey,[127] and Oregon,[128] Lincoln's and Washington's Birthday in Montana,[129] Washington and Lincoln Day in Utah,[130] and George Washington Day in Virginia.[131] ^ The day after Thanksgiving is observed in lieu of Columbus Day in Minnesota.[125] ^ Columbus Day is listed as a state holiday in New Hampshire although state offices remain open.[101] ^ President's Day, Good Friday (11am-3pm), Juneteenth Day (June 19), Columbus Day, Veteran's Day, Partisan Primary Election Day, and General Election Day are listed as a state holiday in Wisconsin although state offices remain open.[132][133] Legal holidays observed nationwide[edit] January 1 – New Year's Day May 25–31 (floating Monday) – Memorial Day Known officially as National Memorial Day in Alabama,[134] and Memorial Day / Decoration Day in Idaho.[105] Observed with Jefferson Davis' Birthday, and known officially as National Memorial Day / Jefferson Davis' Birthday, in Mississippi.[106] July 4 – Independence Day September 1–7 (floating Monday) – Labor Day November 11 – Veterans Day Known officially as Armistice Day in Mississippi.[106] November 22–28 (floating Thursday) – Thanksgiving December 25 – Christmas


Holidays with religious, cultural or historical significance[edit] Main articles: Religion in the United States and Separation of church and state in the United States Box of Valentine chocolates, typically sold around Valentine's Day The religious and cultural holidays in the United States is characterized by a diversity of religious beliefs and practices. However, the First Amendment to the United States Constitution provides that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ...." and Article VI specifies that "no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States." As a result, various religious faiths have flourished, as well as perished, in the United States. A majority of Americans report that religion plays a "very important" role in their lives, a proportion unique among developed nations.[135] The majority of Americans (73–80%) identify themselves as Christians and about 15–20% have no religious affiliation.[136] According to the American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) (2008) 76% of the American adult population identified themselves as Christians, with 51% professing attendance at a variety of churches that could be considered Protestant or unaffiliated, and 25% professing Catholic beliefs.[137] The same survey says that other religions (including, for example, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, and Hinduism) collectively make up about 4% of the adult population, another 15% of the adult population claim no religious affiliation, and 5.2% said they did not know, or they refused to reply. According to a 2012 survey by the Pew forum, 36 percent of Americans state that they attend services nearly every week or more.[138] Confederate States of America[edit] The following memorialize the historic Confederate States of America from the American Civil War: Confederate Memorial Day is a public holiday observed by the U.S. states of Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Louisiana[citation needed] and Texas and an unofficially observed holiday in some other states. It is often in late April to align with the final surrender of the last Confederate Army. Texas observes Confederate Heroes Day. Confederate History Month has been declared at least once in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, and Virginia as well as by various cities, usually in April to augment Confederate Memorial Day. Robert E. Lee Day (on or around Lee's Jan. 19 birthday) is observed in Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida.[citation needed] Arkansas combined the observance of Robert E. Lee Day with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in 1985.[139] In 2017, it passed a law removing Lee's name from the January holiday and instead establishing a state memorial day on the second Saturday of October in honor of Lee.[140] Lee–Jackson Day is a holiday celebrated in Virginia for the birthdays of Robert E. Lee (Jan 19) and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson (Jan 21) The original 1889 holiday celebrated Lee's birthday until Jackson's name was added to the holiday in 1904. The holiday is currently observed on the Friday before Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Drinking holidays[edit] See also: Drinking culture Crowds on Vine Street at the Oktoberfest in Cincinnati According to the National Institutes of Health, about 86% of the U.S. population over 18 drinks alcohol recreationally or socially.[141] In the United States, the holidays that are considered the most "festive" are generally regarded as some of the "most drunken holidays." Celebrations usually revolve around barbecues and beer. Although many of these holiday lack any official status, these holidays are generally observed by the drinking culture for the fact that these holidays revolve around drinking. One measurement of the popularity of these holidays can be measured by the amount of alcohol purchased for the occasion. One particular survey names New Years Eve as the holiday for which the most alcohol is consumed based on sales.[142] While many holidays are listed, some are generally notable for their drinking requirement while others are known for abstinence.[143] Date Name Remarks February 1–7 (floating Sunday) Super Bowl Sunday Usually served at a private party while watching the Super Bowl. February 3-March 9 (floating Tuesday using Computus) Mardi Gras Any alcohol. March 17 St. Patrick's Day Usually celebrated with green beer. April 1–7 Opening Day Ale or lager.[144] May 5 Cinco de Mayo Usually celebrated with a Mexican alcohol like tequila or Margarita. July 4 Independence Day Typically served while eating hot dogs and hamburgers. October 1–7 Oktoberfest Usually German beer. October 31 Halloween Usually served at Halloween parties. December 31 New Year's Eve Traditionally with champagne and is considered the "most drunk" of all American holidays. More alcohol is consumed on this holiday than any other day.[145] African American holidays[edit] Main article: African-American culture 2003 Kwanzaa celebration with its founder, Maulana Karenga, and others African Americans make up about 12% of the U.S. population. While some customs have come from abroad, many of the customs were developed inside the United States. Kwanzaa, for example, is a custom has greatly influenced American culture originating from the "turbulent 60's" when race relations in the United States was at its lowest.[146] Most of the newer holidays revolve around a particular civil rights activist and have recently gained attention from city and state level governments. At the federal level, only Martin Luther King, Jr. was honored. Date Name[147] Remarks December 26-January 1 Kwanzaa Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving.[148] Kwanzaa has seven core principles (Nguzo Saba). It was created by Maulana Karenga, and was first celebrated in 1966–67. January 15–21 (floating Monday) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is the only American federal holiday marking the birthday of an African American. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around King's birthday, January 15. February 1–29 Black History Month Also known as the "African American History Month" which was set aside as an observance of important leaders of the African diaspora. February 4 or December 1 Rosa Parks Day Currently observed in the states of California, Missouri, and Ohio to honor the late civil rights leader Rosa Parks. Rosa Parks Day was created by the California State Legislature and first celebrated February 4, 2000.[149] The holiday was first designated in the U.S. state of Ohio championed by Joyce Beatty, advocate who helped Ohio's legislation pass to honor the late leader.[150] In 2015, Missouri has declared Rosa Parks Day a legal holiday. March 10 Harriet Tubman Day Commemorates anti-slavery activist Harriet Tubman for her accomplishments. Occurs two days after International Women's Day. April 16 (DC) Emancipation Day Currently observed in Washington, D.C., Mississippi, Texas (as Juneteenth), Kentucky, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in observance of the emancipation of slaves of African descent. It is also observed in other areas in regard to the abolition of serfdom or other forms of servitude. May 19 Malcolm X Day Currently observed in Berkeley, California, and Illinois, this holiday honors Malcolm X as a civil rights leader as a legal holiday with offices closed. Various municipalities such as Atlanta, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. have festivals commemorating the civil rights leader. June 19 Juneteenth Juneteenth is a holiday that commemorates the announcement of the abolition of slavery in Texas in June 1865, and more generally the emancipation of African-American slaves throughout the Confederate South. Celebrated on June 19, the term is a portmanteau of June and nineteenth[151][152] and is recognized as a state holiday or special day of observance in most states. June 8–14 (floating Sunday) African New Year Celebrated as the "Odunde Festival" as a one-day festival and mostly a street market catered to African-American interests and the African diaspora. It is derived from the tradition of the Yoruba people of Nigeria in celebration of the new year. It is centered at the intersection of Grays Ferry Avenue and South Street in the U.S. city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Christian holidays[edit] A Stabat Mater depiction, 1868 Main article: Liturgical year With 73% of the U.S. population identifying themselves as Christian, many holidays from the liturgical calendar are observed by this segment of the population. With 94% of businesses including federal, state, and local governments closing on Christmas, arguably the most significant holiday of the Christian religion, many stores are also closed on Christmas, but with a relatively small exception. For example, convenience stores operating on less than 5,000 square feet of space such as 7-Eleven and CVS Pharmacy can remain open.[153] A reference in A Christmas Story shows a Chinese restaurant being the only establishment open on Christmas. Some private businesses and certain other institutions are closed on Good Friday.[154] The financial market and stock market is closed on Good Friday.[155] Most retail stores remain open although some might close early. Public schools and most universities are closed on Good Friday, either as a holiday of its own, or part of spring break. The postal service operates, and banks regulated by the federal government do not close for Good Friday.[2] Many companies, including banks, malls, shopping centers and most private retail stores that normally open on Sundays are closed on Easter.[10] Date Name Remarks January 6 Epiphany Epiphany (from Greek epiphaneia, "manifestation"), falls on the 12th day after Christmas. It commemorates the manifestation of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles, as represented by the Magi, the baptism of Jesus, and the miracle of the wine at the marriage feast at Cana. One of the three major Christian festivals, along with Christmas and Easter. Epiphany originally marked the beginning of the carnival season preceding Lent, and the evening preceding it is known as Twelfth Night. January 7 Orthodox Christmas January 7th is the Gregorian Calendar equivalent of December 25 on the Julian Calendar still observed by the Russian and other Eastern Orthodox Churches. February 3-March 9 (floating Tuesday using Computus) Mardi Gras and Ash Wednesday A festive season (Carnival) leading up to Shrove Tuesday or Mardi Gras. Closes with Ash Wednesday (40 days before Easter, not counting Sundays), which starts the penitential season of Lent in the Western Christian calendar. February 14 Valentine's Day St. Valentine's Day, or simply Valentine's Day is named after one or more early Christian martyrs named Saint Valentine, and was established by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD. Modern traditional celebration of love and romance, including the exchange of cards, candy, flowers, and other gifts. March 15-April 18 (floating Sunday using Computus) Palm Sunday Celebration to commemorate the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. March 17 St. Patrick's Day A holiday honoring Saint Patrick that celebrates Irish culture. Primary activity is simply the wearing of green clothing ("wearing o' the green"), although drinking beer dyed green is also popular. Big parades in some cities, such as in Chicago, where there is also a tradition of dyeing the Chicago River green. March 20-April 23 (floating Friday using Computus) Good Friday Friday of Holy Week, when Western Christians commemorate the crucifixion and death of Jesus. Good Friday is a holiday in some individual counties and municipalities, as well as a state holiday in Connecticut,[156] Delaware,[157] Florida,[158] Hawaii,[159] Indiana,[160] Kentucky,[161] Louisiana,[162] New Jersey,[163] North Carolina,[164] North Dakota,[165] Tennessee[166] and Texas.[167] State and local government offices and courts are closed, as well as state-chartered banks and in these jurisdictions. Federal banks and post offices that are located in buildings that close for Good Friday and Easter will also be closed. Good Friday is also a holiday in U.S. territories of Guam,[168] U.S. Virgin Islands[169] and Puerto Rico.[170] Many public and private schools, colleges, universities and private-sector businesses; and the New York Stock Exchange and financial markets are closed on Good Friday. March 22-April 25 (floating Sunday using Computus) Easter Celebration of the resurrection of Jesus in most Western Christian churches. A minority of Protestant churches do not observe Easter. Eastern Orthodox (including Western Rite), Oriental Orthodox and some Neo-Celtic churches observe Easter according to a different calendar, usually on a later Sunday (thus they also observe Palm Sunday and Good Friday on different days than Western Christians). Many Americans decorate hard-boiled eggs and give baskets of candy, fruit, toys and so on, especially to children; but gifts of age-appropriate Easter baskets for the elderly, the infirm and the needy are increasingly popular. An annual Easter Egg Roll has been held at the White House South Lawn for young children on Easter Monday since President Hayes started the tradition in 1878.[171] Not a federal holiday due to the fact that it always falls on a Sunday, which is a non-working day for federal and state employees. Many companies that are normally open on Sunday close for Easter. October 31 Halloween Originally the end of the Celtic year, it now celebrates Eve of All Saint's Day. Decorations include jack o'lanterns. Costume parties and candy such as candy corn are also part of the holiday. Kids go "trick-or-treating" to neighbors who give away candy. It is not generally observed by businesses, and is one of the most popular holidays in the U.S. December 8 Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary Immaculate Conception is a dogma of the Catholic Church maintaining that the Virgin Mary was kept free of original sin from her moment of conception. Companies in some states will give day off to their employees. December 24 Christmas Eve Day before Christmas. Virtually every business closes early, though a few remain open 24 hours. December 25 Christmas Christmas celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ. It is a Federal Holiday. Hindu holidays[edit] Main article: List of Hindu festivals Rangoli decorations, made using colored powder, are popular during Diwali. According to some sources, the Hindu holidays of Diwali and Holi are commonly celebrated as a "mainstream" holiday throughout the United States, not only by Indian Americans or peoples of Indian descent. Many firms that hire a people from India will even go as far as observing the holidays with a celebration within the company or even approving it as a paid day off.[172][173] Holi, the "festival of colors" has inspired a Broadway musical based on this festival.[174] New York City Council has voted on a resolution that may make Diwali and Holi a legal holiday in Resolution 1863-2013.[175] As of August 2013, the resolution has passed and the holidays are now officially legal holidays in New York City.[176] CNN reported that the Diwali holiday is shown in American pop culture through an episode of The Office.[177][178] Date Name Remarks February or March (depends on Hindu calendar) Holi Holi (English: /ˈhoʊliː/) (Sanskrit: होली) is a spring festival also known as Festival of Colors, and sometimes Festival of Love.[179][180] It is an ancient Hindu religious festival which has become popular with non-Hindus in many parts of South Asia, as well as people of other communities.[181] October or November (depends on Hindu calendar) Diwali Diwali (English: /dɪˈwɑːliː/ or English: /dɪˈvɑːliː/) also called the Festival of lights'", is an ancient Hindu festival celebrated in autumn every year.[182][183] The festival spiritually signifies the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil, and hope over despair.[167][184][185] The festival preparations and rituals typically extend over a five-day period, but the main festival night of Diwali coincides with the darkest, new moon night of the Hindu Lunisolar month Kartik. In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali night falls between mid-October and mid-November. Jewish holidays[edit] Main article: Hebrew calendar A Hanukkah menorah According to various sources, the three most commonly celebrated Jewish holidays are Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Hanukkah.[186] Passover and Yom Kippur in addition to Rosh Hashannah and Hanukkah are recognized as an optional state level holiday in the U.S. state of Texas[187][188] All Jewish holidays start the night before, as that is when the Jewish day begins. Date Name Remarks March 21-April 24 (floating date) Passover פסח A seven- or eight-day festival in Judaism (seven days in Israel, eight outside of Israel), commemorating the Exodus of the Jews from Egypt. For Karaite Jews, Passover is the holiest day of the year and is the festival that marks the beginning of the year. Some Christian groups celebrate Passover instead of Easter. In many regions with large Jewish communities, schools close for all or part of Passover. In some regions with large Jewish populations, schools may close. May 9-June 12 (floating date) Shavuot שבועות A two-day (one in Israel) festival celebrating the receiving of the Torah at Sinai and the harvest season of the Land of Israel. Many people have the custom to eat dairy foods, specifically cheesecake. September 5-October 5 (floating date) Rosh Hashanah ראש השנה Observed by Jewish people. Traditional beginning of the Jewish High Holidays. It also celebrates the beginning of a new year on the Hebrew calendar. In regions with large Jewish populations, schools and universities may close on Rosh Hashanah. It is a widely accepted custom to dip an apple in honey on the first night. Unlike other holidays where the Diaspora (outside of Israel) celebrate extra days, this holiday is observed for two days everywhere. September 14-October 14 (floating date) Yom Kippur יום כיפור Observed by Jewish people. This day marks the end of the Ten Days of Penitence that began with Rosh Hashanah. It is described in Leviticus as a "Sabbath of rest," and synagogue services begin the preceding sundown, resume the following morning, and continue to sundown. Orthodox and many Conservative Jews fast on Yom Kippur. In regions with large Jewish populations, schools and universities may close on Yom Kippur. September 19-October 19 (floating date) Sukkot סוכות A nine-day (eight in Israel) holiday celebrating the huts Jews lived in for forty year after the Exodus before getting to Israel. It also celebrates the cloud of glory that protected the Jews in the desert during the same period. Jews eat, and some sleep, in a special hut called a sukkah outside their home for the first seven days. Also, the 'four species' or 'Arba Minim', ארבע מינים, the Lulav לולב or Palm Fran, the Etrog אתרוג or citron, the Aravot ערבות or willow branch, and the Hadasim הדסים, are shaken in the sukkah in the morning, as well as during prayers. The Seventh Day, known as Hoshanah Rabbah הושנה רבה is the last day of the season of repentance started on Rosh Hashanah, and has extra prayers in addition to the extra holiday prayers. The Eighth day is known as Shemini Atzeret שמיני עצרת and is to some degree considered a different holiday. The ninth day (or part of the eighth in Israel) is known as Simchat Torah שמחת תורה and celebrates he finishing of one cycle of reading the Torah or bible, and includes much joyous singing and dancing with the Torah scrolls during prayers. In many regions with large Jewish communities, schools close for all or part of Passover. November 28-December 27 (floating date) Hanukkah חנוכה An eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd century BC. Candelabras are lit, one candle on the first night and adding one candle per night. It is also a widely accepted custom to spin a top-like toy called a dreidel, and to give coins to the children. February 23-March 26 (floating date) Purim פורים A one-day holiday, celebrated the Jews being saved from a plot by Haman, the second-in-command to Persian king, Achasverosh, or Xerxes, to exterminate every single Jew. It is generally celebrated by reading the Book of Esther in Synagogue the preceding night (which, like all Jewish holidays, is actually part of the holiday) and in the morning, giving charity, giving presents of food baskets to at least two friends, and having a celebratory feast. Unlike most other Jewish holidays (other than Hannukah), work is allowed including using electricity, and other prohibited actions on Sabbath, and other holidays. The day before (or the Thursday before, if Purim is on a Sunday) is a fast day commemorating the fast of Esther before she met with King Achashverosh. In Jerusalem, Purim is celebrated the day after the rest of the world. Islamic holidays[edit] Main article: Islamic holidays Mehndi is the application of henna as a temporary form of skin decoration, commonly applied during Eid al-Fitr in Indian subcontinent culture. According to various sources, the major holidays of Ramadan, Eid al-Fitr, and Eid al-Adha have been recognized in the United States. Awareness of these holidays can be found in calendars published by major calendar manufacturers.[189][190][191] According to Al-Jazeera, schools in the U.S. states of New York and Michigan (mainly Dearborn) may begin to close in observance of all Muslim holidays.[192] Date Name Remarks depends on Islamic calendar(in this year is on June and July) Ramadan Ramadan (Arabic: رمضان‎ Ramaḍān, IPA: [rɑmɑˈdˤɑːn];[variations] Persian: رَمَضان‎ Ramazān; Urdu / Punjabi رَمْضان Ramzān; Turkish: Ramazan) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar;[193] Muslims worldwide observe this as a month of fasting.[194][195] This annual observance is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam.[196] The month lasts 29–30 days based on the visual sightings of the crescent moon, according to numerous biographical accounts compiled in the hadiths.[197][198] The word Ramadan comes from the Arabic root ramiḍa or ar-ramaḍ, which means scorching heat or dryness.[199] Fasting is fard ("obligatory") for adult Muslims, except those who are ill, traveling, pregnant, breastfeeding, diabetic or going through menstrual bleeding.[200] Fasting the month of Ramadan was made obligatory (wājib) during the month of Sha'aban, in the second year after the Muslims migrated from Mecca to Medina. depends on Islamic calendar (in this year is on 16 of July) Eid al-Fitr Eid al-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر‎ ʻĪd al-Fiṭr, IPA: [ʕiːd al fitˤr], "festival of breaking of the fast"), also called Feast of Breaking the Fast, the Sugar Feast, Bayram (Bajram), the Sweet Festival[201] and the Lesser Eid, is an important religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting (sawm). The religious Eid is a single day and Muslims are not permitted to fast on that day. The holiday celebrates the conclusion of the 29 or 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting during the entire month of Ramadan. The day of Eid, therefore, falls on the first day of the month of Shawwal. This is a day when Muslims around the world show a common goal of unity. The date for the start of any lunar Hijri month varies based on the observation of new moon by local religious authorities, so the exact day of celebration varies by locality. However, in most countries, it is generally celebrated on the same day as Saudi Arabia(lunar calendar). depends on Islamic calendar (in this year is on 24 of September) Eid al-Adha Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى‎ ʿīd al-aḍḥā [ʕiːd ælˈʔɑdˤħæ] meaning "Festival of the sacrifice"), also called the Feast of the Sacrifice, the Major Festival,[202] the Greater Eid, Kurban Bayram (Turkish: Kurban Bayramı; Bosnian: kurban-bajram), Eid e Qurban (Persian: عید قربان‎) or Bakr'Eid (Urdu: بکرا عید‎), is the second of two religious holidays celebrated by Muslims worldwide each year. It honors the willingness of Abraham (Ibrahim) to sacrifice his young first-born son Ishmael (Ismail)a as an act of submission to God's command, before God then intervened to provide Abraham with a lamb to sacrifice instead.[203] In the lunar-based Islamic calendar, Eid al-Adha falls on the 10th day of Dhu al-Hijjah and lasts for four days.[204] In the international Gregorian calendar, the dates vary from year to year, drifting approximately 11 days earlier each year. Other religious, traditional, and informal holidays celebrated in the United States[edit] Cinco de Mayo performers at the White House In addition to the federal/national holidays, many religious, ethnic, and other traditional holidays populate the calendar, as well as observances proclaimed by officials and lighter celebrations. These are rarely observed by businesses as holidays (Except for Easter and most often also on Good Friday);[10] indeed, many are viewed as opportunities for commercial promotion. Because of this commercialization, some critics apply the deprecatory term Hallmark holiday to such days, after the Hallmark greeting card company. Date Name Remarks February 2 Groundhog Day The day on which folklore states that whether or not a local groundhog casts a shadow determines if the spring season will arrive early or on time. one day first week of February National Girls and Women in Sports Day A day of observance recognizing women's contributions to sports and society. March 8 International Women's Day A day set aside to honor women and their accomplishments in history. April 1 April Fools' Day A day that people commonly play tricks or jokes on family, friends, and co-workers, especially in English-speaking nations. Sometimes called "the Feast of All Fools" as a play on the feast days of saints; there is no evidence the holiday has any Christian religious origins. April 22 (varies by location and observance) Earth Day A celebration of environmentalism. April 24–30 (floating Friday) Arbor Day A day for planting trees. May 1 May Day In most other countries, May 1 is International Workers' Day, the equivalent of Labor Day, which commemorates the labor movement and the ultimate triumph of socialism over capitalism. This theme borrows from the pagan origins of May Day which emphasized the change in season and the triumph of the warm sun over the cold winter. The holiday is often celebrated with parades and protests for workers' rights and other broad social issues. May 5 Cinco de Mayo Primarily a celebration of Mexican culture by Mexican-Americans living in the United States. Although this is the anniversary of the victory of the Mexican Army over the French at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, Cinco de Mayo is far more important in the USA than in Mexico itself, often celebrated even by non-Mexican-Americans. Additionally, this "holiday" is often mistaken by Americans as being Mexican Independence Day, which is actually observed on September 16. May 8–14 (floating Sunday) Mother's Day Honors mothers and motherhood (made a "federal holiday" by Presidential order, although most federal agencies are already closed on Sundays) June 1–7 (floating Sunday) Children's Day Proclaimed by President George W. Bush in 2001 to honor children.[205] June 14 Flag Day Commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, in 1777. June 27 Helen Keller Day Commemorates the achievements of Helen Keller and the blind. June 15–21 (floating Sunday) Father's Day Honors fathers and fatherhood. August 26 Women's Equality Day Celebrates the fight for, and progress towards, equality for women. Established by the United States Congress in 1971 to commemorate two anniversaries: Passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution ensuring Woman Suffrage in 1920 and a nationwide demonstration for equal rights, the Women's Strike for Equality, in 1970. September 4,7-10,12,13 (floating Sunday) Grandparent's Day Similar to Mother's/Father's Day but honoring grandparents and grandparenthood. September 11 Patriot Day Commemorates the attacks on the World Trade Center (New York City), The Pentagon (Washington, D.C.), and United Airlines Flight 93 in 2001. September 17 Constitution/Citizenship Day Commemorates the adoption of the Constitution of the United States. October Oktoberfest 16-day folk festival drinking beer. Modeled after the original Oktoberfest from Munich, Germany. October 6 German-American Day Commemorates the date in 1683 when 13 German families from Krefeld near the Rhine landed in Philadelphia. These families subsequently founded in Germantown, Pennsylvania, the first German settlement in the original thirteen American colonies. October 9 Leif Erikson Day Honors Leif Erikson, the Norse Viking explorer, who led the first Europeans to discover and set foot in the New World. November 2–8 (floating Tuesday) Election Day or Democracy Day Observed by the federal and state governments in applicable years; legal holiday in some states. November 23–29 (floating Friday) Black Friday Traditionally the beginning of the Christmas shopping season in the United States. "Black Friday" is not a holiday under that name, but California and some other states observe "The Day After Thanksgiving" as a holiday for state government employees. Virtually all schools, colleges, and universities are also closed, along with many non-retail private sector businesses. Federal government offices, post offices and federally chartered banks must open on Black Friday (unless the President issues an executive order or proclamation allowing them to close). It is called "Black Friday" because it begins the sales period when most American retailers make their profits for the year. Contrary to popular belief, Black Friday is not the busiest sales day of the year (that honor belongs to Christmas Eve, December 24). Rather, it is the barometer by which retailers are able to gauge December sales and whether they will indeed end the year "in the black" (instead of "in the red"). A busy Black Friday almost invariably indicates a busy shopping season, while poor sales on Black Friday usually herald a very slow season. December 7 Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Day to mourn the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941. December 31 New Year's Eve Final Day of the Gregorian year. Usually accompanied by much celebration, such as party and fireworks. Virtually every company and retail outlet closes early, except for stores that sell alcoholic beverages and party supplies.


Other notable holidays[edit] United States Air Force Super Bowl party 420 (April 20th; counterculture holiday in which participants meet and consume cannabis) Black Friday (busy shopping day where stores lower prices the Friday after Thanksgiving, traditionally the start of the Christmas shopping season) Cricket World Cup is watched by a quarter of the world's population. Its popularity in the United States has made many offices and shops close particularly where Indians and Pakistanis work.[206][207] Cyber Monday (the equivalent of Black Friday, except online, the Monday after Black Friday) Free Comic Book Day (an annual promotional effort started in 2002 to bring in new consumers to independent comic book stores, takes place the first Saturday in May) Go Skateboarding Day (June 21) International Talk Like a Pirate Day (September 19): a tongue-in-cheek holiday celebrating Pirate culture Oktoberfest (celebrated most often in areas with contemporary or historic populations of German heritage) Opening Day (first week of April; the beginning of the Major League Baseball season and an unofficial indication that summer is approaching) Pi Day (March 14) (on March 14 for the beginning of pi, 3.14) Small Business Saturday (day after Black Friday; encourages holiday shoppers to patronize brick and mortar businesses that are small and local) Spring break (one week in late winter or early spring that schools are off) State Patty's Day (the Penn State University alternative to St. Patrick's Day due to the holiday falling on spring break) Summer vacation (summer months in which schools are off) Super Bowl Sunday (the first Sunday in February; the day of the National Football League's championship; festivities generally including in-home parties and watching the game on television with beverages and snacks) Super Tuesday (political event, quadrennial) Tax Day (federal and state tax deadline, April 15; or if on weekend or holiday, next closest Monday or business day) Tax Freedom Day (day in which an average citizen is said to have worked enough to pay his or her taxes for the year)


See also[edit] Holidays portal United States federal observances Holidays in Puerto Rico Mexican fiestas in the United States Easter controversy Christmas controversy Hallmark holiday Tax holiday Work–life balance in the United States


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Linguistischen Kolloquiums in Mannheim 2006, 1, 107, ISBN 978-3631599174 ^ The New Oxford Dictionary of English (1998) ISBN 0-19-861263-X - p.540 "Diwali /dɪwɑːli/ (also Divali) noun a Hindu festival with lights...". ^ Diwali Encyclopædia Britannica (2009) ^ Diwali - Celebrating the triumph of goodness Hinduism Today (2012) ^ Vera, Zak (February 2010). Invisible River: Sir Richard's Last Mission. ISBN 978-1-4389-0020-9. Retrieved 26 October 2011. First Diwali day called Dhanteras or wealth worship. We perform Laskshmi-Puja in evening when clay diyas lighted to drive away shadows of evil spirits.  ^ "Jewish Holidays".  ^ "Rosh Hashanah".  ^ "Holidays - Tablet Magazine – Jewish News and Politics, Jewish Arts and Culture, Jewish Life and Religion". tabletmag.com. Retrieved 3 September 2015.  ^ "Major Islamic Holidays".  ^ "Eid al-Fitr".  ^ "Eid al-Adha".  ^ "New York Schools Could Get Muslim Holidays".  ^ BBC - Religions. Retrieved 2012-07-25 ^ "Muslims worldwide start to observe Ramadan". Global Times. 2012. Retrieved 28 July 2012.  ^ "The Muslim World Observes Ramadan". Power Text Solutions. 2012. Retrieved 28 July 2012. [permanent dead link] ^ "Schools - Religions". BBC. Retrieved 2012-07-25.  ^ Bukhari-Ibn-Ismail, AbdAllah-Muhammad. "Sahih Bukhari - Book 031 (The Book of Fasting), Hadith 124". hadithcollection.com. Retrieved 25 July 2012.  ^ Muslim-Ibn-Habaj, Abul-Hussain. "Sahih Muslim - Book 006 (The Book of Fasting), Hadith 2378". hadithcollection.com. Retrieved 25 July 2012.  ^ Muslim-Ibn-Habaj, Abul-Hussain. "Sahih Muslim - Book 006 (The Book of Fasting), Hadith 2391". hadithcollection.com. Retrieved 25 July 2012.  ^ Fasting (Al Siyam) - الصيام - Page 18, el Bahay el Kholi, 1998 ^ Elias, Jamal J. (1999). Islam. Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415211654.  ^ Elias, Jamal J. (1999). Islam. Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415211654. Retrieved October 24, 2012.  ^ Diversity Calendar: Eid al-Adha Archived 2012-10-19 at the Wayback Machine., University of Kansas Medical Center ^ "BBC – Religion & Ethics – Eid el Adha". 2009-09-07. Retrieved December 25, 2016.  ^ Children's Day ^ "ICC Cricket World Cup 2015".  ^ "Cricket World Cup links fans to home". 


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