Contents 1 Early life 2 Career 2.1 Olympic runner 2.2 Comeback attempt and other activities 3 Style 4 Allegations of performance-enhancing drug use 5 Personal life 6 Death 7 Legacy 8 Olympic Games and trials results 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External links


Early life[edit] Griffith was born in Los Angeles, California, seventh of eleven children born to Robert, an electronic engineer and Florence Griffith, a seamstress.[1][6] The family lived in Littlerock, California before Florence Griffith moved with her children to the Jordan Downs public housing complex located in the Watts section of Los Angeles.[7][8] When Griffith was in elementary school, she joined the Sugar Ray Robinson Organization, running in track meets on weekends.[8] She won the Jesse Owens National Youth Games two years in a row, at the ages of 14 and 15.[9] Griffith ran track at Jordan High School in Los Angeles.[8] Showing an early interest in fashion, Griffith persuaded the members of the track team to wear tights with their uniforms.[9] As a high school senior in 1978, she finished sixth at the CIF California State Meet behind future teammates Alice Brown and Pam Marshall.[10] Nevertheless, by the time Griffith graduated from Jordan High School in 1978, she set high school records in sprinting and long jump.[11]


Career[edit] Griffith attended the California State University at Northridge, and was on the track team coached by Bob Kersee.[12][13] This team, which included Brown and Jeanette Bolden,[13][14][15] won the national championship during Griffith's first year of college.[11] However, Griffith had to drop out to support her family, taking a job as a bank teller. Kersee found financial aid for Griffith and she returned to college in 1980, this time at University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) where Kersee was working as a coach.[8][13][16] Brown, Bolden, and Griffith qualified for the 100-meter final at the trials for the 1980 Summer Olympics (with Brown winning and Griffith finishing last in the final). Griffith also ran the 200 meters, narrowly finishing fourth, a foot out of a qualifying position.[9] However, the U.S. Government had already decided to boycott those Olympic Games mooting those results.[17] In 1983, Griffith graduated from UCLA with her bachelor's degree in psychology.[11] Olympic runner[edit] Griffith finished fourth in the 200-meter sprint at the first World Championship in Athletics in 1983.[18] The following year, Griffith qualified for the Olympics in the 200-meter distance with the second fastest time at the United States Olympic Trials, held in Los Angeles.[19] Evelyn Ashford, another UCLA alumnus and early favorite to medal,[20] dropped out of the 200-meter due to injury.[19] Griffith went on to win a silver medal in the 1984 Summer Olympics.[11] After the 1984 Olympic Games, she spent less time running.[21] Griffith continued to run part-time,[21] winning the 100-meter IAAF Grand Prix Final with the time of 11.00 seconds.[22] She did not compete at the 1985 U.S. National Championship.[23] That same year, Griffith returned to working at a bank and styled hair and nails in her spare time.[11] She married Al Joyner, the Olympic triple jump champion of 1984, in 1987.[24] She returned to athletics in April 1987, having gained weight.[25] Four months later at the 1987 World Championships in Rome, Griffith Joyner finished second in the 200 meter sprint.[26][25] Her success during the 1987 season resulted in being ranked second in Track and Field News' 1987 world rankings.[26] The 200-meter remained a stronger event for Griffith Joyner than the 100-meter, where she was ranked seventh in the United States.[26] Before the 1988 U.S. Olympic Trials, Griffith Joyner continued to work with her coach Kersee two days a week, but with her new husband coaching her three days a week.[27] She qualified for the U.S. Olympic Trials at 100-meters based on the 10.96 personal record set in Cologne in 1987.[citation needed] She set a new personal record in the 100 meters in San Diego on June 25, 1988, still shy of then American record holder Evelyn Ashford's three best times.[28] A week before the trials she ran a tune-up race in 10.99 in Santa Monica.[29] In the first race of the quarterfinals of the U.S. Olympic Trials, she stunned her colleagues when she sprinted 100 meters in 10.49 seconds, a new world record.[a] [9] Since 1997 the International Athletics Annual of the Association of Track and Field Statisticians has listed this performance as "probably strongly wind assisted, but recognized as a world record".[30][b] Over the two day trials, Griffith Joyner recorded the three fastest times for a woman at 100 meters: 10.49 in the quarter-final, 10.70 in the semi-final, and 10.61 in the finals.[32][25] At the same Olympic trials Griffith Joyner also set an American record at the 200-meter distance with a time of 21.77 seconds.[33] Following the Olympic trials, in late July 1988, Griffith Joyner left coach Kersee saying she wanted a coach able to provide more personal attention. Another contributing factor was Griffith Joyner's unhappiness with the lack of sponsorship and endorsement opportunities.[34] In addition to serving as coach, Kersee was Griffith Joyner's manager, as he required all the athletes he coached to use his management services too.[34] Griffith Joyner's decision to sign with personal manager Gordon Baskin therefore necessitated the coaching change.[34][35] Griffith Joyner left UCLA for UC Irvine with her husband serving as full-time coach.[27] By now known to the world as "Flo-Jo", Griffith Joyner was the big favorite for the titles in the sprint events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. In the 100-meter final, she ran a 10.54, beating her nearest rival, Evelyn Ashford, by 0.30 seconds. In the 200 meter semifinal, she set the world record of 21.56 seconds and then broke this record, winning the final by 0.22 seconds with a time of 21.34 seconds.[36] At the same Olympics, Griffith Joyner also ran with the 4 × 100 m relay and the 4 × 400 m relay teams. Her team won the 4 × 100 m relay and finished second in the 4 × 400 m relay.[21] This was Griffith Joyner's first internationally rated 4 × 400 m relay. Griffith Joyner left the games having won four Olympic medals, three gold and one silver.[37] At the time, Griffith's medal haul was the second most for female track and field athlete in history, behind only Fanny Blankers-Koen who won four gold medals in 1948.[37] In February 1989, Griffith Joyner announced her retirement from racing.[35][38] Griffith Joyner cited her new business opportunities outside of sprinting.[11][38][39] The month after announcing her retirement, Griffith Joyner was selected as the winner of the James E. Sullivan Award of 1988 as the top amateur athlete in the United States.[40] Comeback attempt and other activities[edit] Griffith Joyner's success at the 1988 Olympics led to new opportunities.[35][39] In the weeks following the Olympics, Griffith Joyner earned millions of dollars from endorsement deals, primarily in Japan. Griffith Joyner also signed a deal with toy maker LJN Toys for a Barbie-like doll in her likeness.[35] Among the things she did away from the track was to design the basketball uniforms for the Indiana Pacers NBA team in 1989.[11] She served as co-chair of President's Council on Physical Fitness.[21] She made a guest appearance as herself on a season 4 episode of 227. Griffith Joyner appeared in the soap opera Santa Barbara in 1992, as "Terry Holloway", a photographer similar to Annie Leibovitz.[41][42] In 1996, Griffith Joyner appeared on Charlie Rose and announced her comeback to competitive athletics, concentrating on the 400-meter run.[43] Her reason was that she had already set world marks in both the 100 m and 200 m events, with the 400 m world record being her goal. Griffith Joyner trained steadily leading up to the U.S. Olympic trials in June. However, tendinitis in her right leg ended her hopes of becoming a triple-world-record holder. Al Joyner also attempted a comeback, but he was unable to compete due to an injured quadriceps muscle.[44]


Style[edit] Beyond her running prowess, Griffith Joyner was known for her bold fashion choices.[32][45] Griffith Joyner appeared at the World Championships in 1987 in Rome wearing a hooded speed skating body suit.[45][24] In April 1988 she started wearing a running suit with the right leg of the suit extending to the ankle and the left leg of the suit cut off, a style she called the "one-legger".[32][45][24] The running suits also had bold colors such as lime green or purple with white bikini bottoms and embellished with lightning bolts.[32] Her nails also garnered attention for their length and designs.[32][24] Her nails were four inches long with tiger stripes at the 1988 Olympic trials before switching to fuchsia.[32] For the Olympic games themselves, Griffith Joyner had six inch nails painted red, white, blue, and gold.[24] Although many sprinters avoided accessories which might slow them down, Griffith Joyner kept her hair long and wore jewelry while competing.[45] She designed many of her outfits herself and preferred looks which were not conventional.[45]


Allegations of performance-enhancing drug use[edit] Other athletes, including Joaquim Cruz and Ben Johnson, expressed disbelief over Griffith Joyner's dramatic improvement over a short period of time.[46] Before the 1988 track and field season, Griffith Joyner's best time in the 100-meter sprint was 10.96 seconds. In 1988, she improved that by 0.47 seconds (or 0.35 sec for the non-wind-aided time). Similarly, her best before 1988 at 200-meters was 21.96 seconds. In 1988, she improved that by 0.62 seconds to 21.34 seconds, another time that has not been approached. Griffith Joyner attributed the change in her physique to new health programs.[47] Al Joyner replaced Bob Kersee as her coach, and he changed her training program to include more lower body strength training exercises such as squats and lunges.[48] Darrell Robinson, a former teammate of Griffith Joyner, claimed that he sold her 10 c.c. of HGH for $2,000 in 1988. He said Joyner told him: "if you want to make $1 million, you've got to invest some thousands."[47] Robinson also claimed to receive steroids from coach Bob Kersee, and said he saw Carl Lewis inject himself with drugs he believed to be testosterone.[49] Robinson never provided any evidence for his allegations and was shunned by the athletics community, leading to the premature end of his career.[50] Griffith Joyner retired from competitive track and field after her Olympic triumph in 1988.[51] She was repeatedly tested during competition, and she passed all of these drug tests.[52][53] After her death in 1998, Prince Alexandre de Merode, the Chairman of the International Olympic Committee's medical commission, claimed that Joyner was singled out for extra, rigorous drug testing during the 1988 Olympic Games because of rumors of steroid use. De Merode told The New York Times that Manfred Donike, who was at that time considered to be the foremost expert on drugs and sports, failed to discover any banned substances during that testing.[54] De Merode later said: "We performed all possible and imaginable analyses on her. We never found anything. There should not be the slightest suspicion."[55]


Personal life[edit] Griffith's nickname among family was "Dee Dee".[6][8] She was briefly engaged to hurdler Greg Foster.[6] In 1987, Griffith married 1984 Olympic triple jump champion Al Joyner, whom Griffith had first met at the 1980 Olympic Trials.[9][56] Through her marriage to Joyner she was sister-in-law to track and field athlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee.[56] Griffith Joyner and Joyner had one daughter together, born November 15, 1990.[11][57]


Death[edit] On September 21, 1998, Griffith Joyner died in her sleep at home in the Canyon Crest neighborhood of Mission Viejo, California, at the age of 38. The unexpected death was investigated by the sheriff-coroner's office, which announced on September 22 that the cause of death was suffocation during a severe epileptic seizure.[51] She was also found to have had a cavernous hemangioma, a congenital vascular brain abnormality that made Joyner subject to seizures.[58] According to a family attorney, she had suffered a tonic–clonic seizure in 1990, and had also been treated for seizures in 1993 and 1994. According to the Orange County Sheriff-Coroner's office, the only drugs in her system when she died were small amounts of two common over-the-counter drugs, acetominophen (Tylenol) and Benadryl.[59]


Legacy[edit] USA Track & Field inducted her into its Hall of Fame in 1995.[60] In 2000, the 102nd Street School in Los Angeles was renamed Florence Griffith Joyner Elementary School. Griffith Joyner had attended the school as a child.[7] The city of Mission Viejo dedicated a park at the entrance to her neighborhood in her honor.[61][62] Griffith Joyner was also an artist and painter. Her work has been on display as part the Art of The Olympians (AOTO). She is one of two posthumous members of AOTO, the other being the founder and Olympian, Al Oerter.[63]


Olympic Games and trials results[edit] Source:[36][64] Race Venue Date Round Time Wind WR 100 m Indianapolis July 16, 1988 Qualifying heat 10.60 +3.2 100 m Indianapolis July 16, 1988 Quarter-final 10.49 0.0 WR 100 m Indianapolis July 17, 1988 Semi-final 10.70 +1.6 100 m Indianapolis July 17, 1988 Final 10.61 +1.2 100 m Seoul September 24, 1988 Qualifying heat 10.88 +1.0 100 m Seoul September 24, 1988 Quarter-final 10.62 +1.0 100 m Seoul September 25, 1988 Semi-final 10.70 +2.6 100 m Seoul September 25, 1988 Final 10.54 +3.0 200 m Indianapolis July 22, 1988 Qualifying heat 21.96 +0.6 200 m Indianapolis July 22, 1988 Quarter-final 21.77 −0.1 200 m Indianapolis July 23, 1988 Semi-final 21.90 +2.4 200 m Indianapolis July 23, 1988 Final 21.85 +1.3 200 m Seoul September 28, 1988 Qualifying heat 22.51  ? 200 m Seoul September 28, 1988 Quarter-final 21.76 +0.7 200 m Seoul September 29, 1988 Semi-final 21.56 +1.7 200 m Seoul September 29, 1988 Final 21.34 +1.3 WR 100 m relay ( 4 × 100 m relay ) Seoul October 1, 1988 Semi-Final (team time 42.12) 100 m relay ( 4 × 100 m relay ) Seoul October 1, 1988 Final (team time 41.98) 400 m relay split ( 4 × 400 m relay ) Seoul October 1, 1988 Final 48.08 (team time 3:15.51)


See also[edit] History of African Americans in Los Angeles


Notes[edit] ^ Evelyn Ashford held the previous record at the 100-meter distance with a time of 10.76 seconds. ^ Griffith Joyner's next fastest wind-legal time at 100-meters is 10.61 seconds, which would also stand as the world record.[31]


References[edit] ^ a b c Nathan Aaseng. "African-American Athletes". Google Books. Infobase. Retrieved January 7, 2018.  ^ Whitaker, Matthew C. (2011). Icons of Black America: Breaking Barriers and Crossing Boundaries, Volume 1. 1. ABC-CLIO. p. 520. ISBN 0-313-37642-5.  ^ "FloJo: World's Fastest Woman". CNN.  ^ "World's fastest woman Carmelita Jeter seeks Olympic gold". USA Today. June 22, 2011.  ^ Florence Griffith Joyner: Fastest Woman on Earth. Legacy.com. December 21, 2010. ^ a b c "Flashy Florence Griffith Joyner Will Be the One to Watch—and Clock—in the Women's Sprints : People.com". www.people.com. 29 August 1988. Retrieved 2016-07-22.  ^ a b BRIGGS, JOHNATHON E. (2000-01-15). "School Renamed for Late Track Star Griffith Joyner". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-07-24.  ^ a b c d e Childs, Joy (2012-08-10). "The mother behind the Olympian reveals the spirit that was Flo Jo". lawattstimes.com. Retrieved 2016-07-24.  ^ a b c d e Schwartz, Kris (1998-07-16). "ESPN Classic - FloJo sets 100 record at 1988 Olympic Trials". espn.go.com. Retrieved 2016-07-24.  ^ "California State Meet Results – 1915 to present". prepcaltrack.com. Retrieved December 25, 2012.  ^ a b c d e f g h Schwartz, Kris. "FloJo Made Speed Fashionable". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 24, 2011.  ^ HARVEY, RANDY (1988-07-29). "Griffith-Joyner Leaves Kersee's Club; She'll Be Coached Solely by Husband". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-07-21.  ^ a b c BENNETT, BILL. "FOND MEMORIES OF GRIFFITH JOYNER". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2016-07-21.  ^ "Alice Brown". Pasadena Sports Hall of Fame, Inc. Retrieved June 24, 2017.  ^ "Brown, Howard Reach Semifinals in Sprint Events". Los Angeles Times. August 30, 1987. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved June 24, 2017.  ^ Florence Griffith Joyner – Olympic Dreams – Kersee, Angeles, Olympics, and Coach. Sports.jrank.org. Retrieved on May 11, 2014. ^ Hymans, R. (2008) The History of the United States Olympic Trials – Track & Field. USA Track & Field. usatf.org ^ "IAAF: 200 Metres Result | 1st IAAF World Championships in Athletics | iaaf.org". iaaf.org. Retrieved 2016-08-06.  ^ a b Moore, Kenny (July 2, 1984). "Trials And Jubilation". SI.com. Retrieved August 30, 2017.  ^ Times, Diane K. Shah, Special To The New York (February 23, 1983). "THE GRUELING ROAD OF EVELYN ASHFORD". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 30, 2017.  ^ a b c d Longman, Jere (September 22, 1998). "Florence Griffith Joyner, 38, Champion Sprinter, Is Dead". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 30, 2017.  ^ "IAAF Grand Prix, Combined Events Challenge and Golden Events". www.gbrathletics.com. Retrieved May 25, 2017.  ^ Florence, Mal (June 11, 1985). "Track / Mal Florence : Pursley's Mishap Points Out How Dangerous Pole Vaulting Is". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved August 30, 2017.  ^ a b c d e Rowbottom, Mike (1998-09-21). "Athletics: Flo-Jo's flamboyant life and times". Independent. Retrieved 2016-09-02.  ^ a b c Burnton, Simon (April 11, 2012). "50 stunning Olympic moments No22: Florence Griffith Joyner, Seoul 1988". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved June 24, 2017.  ^ a b c ORTEGA, JOHN (1988-02-05). "Griffith-Joyner Ranked 2nd in World for 200 Meters". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-08-21.  ^ a b HARVEY, RANDY (1988-07-29). "Griffith-Joyner Leaves Kersee's Club; She'll Be Coached Solely by Husband". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-07-23.  ^ FLORENCE, MAL (1988-06-26). "Kingdom, 13.17 Into Wind, Routs Foster : Joyner-Kersee Jumps 24-3, Griffith Joyner Runs 10.89 in San Diego". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-08-04.  ^ http://www.alltime-athletics.com/w_100ok.htm ^ Linthorne, Nick (March 2003). "Wind Assistance". Brunel University. Retrieved August 25, 2008.  ^ Sully, Kevin (24 March 2014). "The Wind Read Zero: An oral history of Florence Griffith-Joyner's 100-meter world record". Daily Relay. Retrieved 27 July 2016.  ^ a b c d e f Hersh, Phil (1988-07-18). "Griffith-joyner Nails 100-meter Dash Final". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2016-09-02.  ^ Hymans, Richard (2008). "The History of the United States Olympic Trials -- Track and Field" (PDF). USATF. p. 30. Retrieved 2016-08-22.  ^ a b c Hersh, Phil (1988-08-07). "Kersee Still Waiting For Reason Griffith Joyner Dropped Him As". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2016-08-05.  ^ a b c d Moore, Kenny (1989-04-10). "The Spoils Of Victory". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2016-07-31.  ^ a b Florence Griffith Joyner Archived August 22, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.. sports-reference.com ^ a b Times, Frank Litsky, Special To The New York (1988-10-02). "THE SEOUL OLYMPICS: Track and Field; Pride and Frustration for the Americans". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-08-23.  ^ a b "Florence Griffith-Joyner - CNN.com". www.cnn.com. 2008-07-08. Retrieved 2016-07-31.  ^ a b Macnow, Glen (1988-12-16). "Cash Flo Griffith Joyner Leads The Pack In Cashing In On The Olympics". Philly.com. Retrieved 2016-07-31.  ^ "SPORTS PEOPLE: TRACK AND FIELD; Griffith Joyner Gets Sullivan Award". The New York Times. 1989-03-07. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-08-02.  ^ Arkatov, Janice (August 8, 1992). "Flo Jo Hopes the Training Pays Off for Her Role on 'Santa Barbara'". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved May 26, 2017.  ^ Hart, Marla (August 13, 1992). "Backstage With Phoebe". tribunedigital-chicagotribune. Retrieved June 24, 2017.  ^ "Flo Jo may abort comeback". The San Francisco Chronicle. April 21, 1997.  ^ Atlanta Out for Joyners. Nytimes.com (June 4, 1996). Retrieved on May 11, 2014. ^ a b c d e Bock, Hal (24 July 1988). "Griffith-Joyner Just Getting Out of the Blocks : She Says Weight Training, Faster Starts Pushed Her to World Record in 100". Associated Press. Retrieved 24 August 2016.  ^ "O doping está no auge" (in Portuguese). Veja Online. August 16, 2000.  ^ a b Speed, glamour, doubt will be Flo-Jo's legacy, Reuters, September 23, 1998 ^ Dream Chaser, Tom Friend, ESPN.com ^ "Ex-teammate: Flo-jo, Lewis Used Drugs". tribunedigital-chicagotribune.  ^ Wright, Gerard (September 26, 1998). "Athletics: Downfall of a man quick to accuse". The Independent. Retrieved June 24, 2017.  ^ a b Anderson, Kristina Rebelo. "The Uneasy Death Of Florence Griffith Joyner". salon.com.  ^ Suspicion surrounds Flo-Jo's death. BBC News (September 23, 1998). Retrieved on May 11, 2014. ^ TAC Board Approves Random Drug Testing. Articles.latimes.com (March 13, 1989). Retrieved on May 11, 2014. ^ PLUS: TRACK AND FIELD; Official Defends Griffith Joyner. Nytimes.com (September 24, 1998). Retrieved on May 11, 2014. ^ Montague, James (August 10, 2012) Saving Flo Jo: Taking back a legacy. CNN ^ a b HARVEY, RANDY (1988-09-14). "OLYMPICS '88: A PREVIEW : THE FIRST FAMILY : Joyner and Kersee Got a Jump in Their Personal Relationship". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-07-18.  ^ Penner, Mike (22 September 1998). "From the Archives: Track Olympian Florence Griffith Joyner Dies at 38". latimes.com. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2016-07-18.  ^ "Seizure was brought on by a congenital defect in Griffith Joyner's brain". BBC. October 23, 1998. Retrieved January 4, 2010.  ^ Jeff Gottlieb (October 23, 1998). "Seizure Led to FloJo's Death". Los Angeles Times.  ^ "USATF - Hall of Fame". www.usatf.org. Retrieved 2016-07-24.  ^ Florence Joyner Olympiad Park. Google.com. Retrieved on June 30, 2014. ^ "(22) Florence Joyner Olympiad Park - CITY OF MISSION VIEJO".  ^ "Art of the Olympians | Florence Griffith-Joyner". artoftheolympians.org. Retrieved 2015-12-22.  ^ Track & Field all-time performances. Alltime-athletics.com. Retrieved on May 11, 2014.


External links[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Florence Griffith Joyner. Official website Florence Griffith Joyner profile at IAAF Florence Griffith Joyner at USATF Florence Griffith Joyner on IMDb Florence Griffith Joyner at AOTO Florence Griffith Joyner at Find a Grave Videos: "10.49 sec - Florence Griffith-Joyner" (video). 100m Women's World Records. Track and Field Video. Indianapolis: SprintIC. July 16, 1988. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007.  "21.34 sec - Florence Griffith-Joyner" (video). 200m Women's World Records. Track and Field Video. Seoul: SprintIC. Sep 29, 1988. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007.  Friend, Tom (Aug 26, 2009). "Dream Chaser". Outside the Lines. ESPN. Al Joyner feels the presence of Florence Griffith 25 years after Olympic glory. Now, in their daughter, he sees a young Flo Jo  Records Preceded by Evelyn Ashford Women's 100 m world record holder July 16, 1988 – present Incumbent Preceded by Marita Koch Women's 200 m world record holder September 29, 1988 – present Incumbent Awards and achievements Preceded by Steffi Graf United Press International Athlete of the Year 1988 Succeeded by Steffi Graf Preceded by Jackie Joyner-Kersee Women's Track & Field Athlete of the Year 1988 Succeeded by Ana Fidelia Quirot Preceded by Ben Johnson L'Équipe Champion of Champions 1988 Succeeded by Greg LeMond Sporting positions Preceded by Silke Möller Women's 200 m best year performance 1988 Succeeded by Dawn Sowell v t e Olympic champions in women's 100 metres 1928  Betty Robinson (USA) 1932  Stanisława Walasiewicz (POL) 1936  Helen Stephens (USA) 1948  Fanny Blankers-Koen (NED) 1952  Marjorie Jackson (AUS) 1956  Betty Cuthbert (AUS) 1960  Wilma Rudolph (USA) 1964  Wyomia Tyus (USA) 1968  Wyomia Tyus (USA) 1972  Renate Stecher (GDR) 1976  Annegret Richter (FRG) 1980  Lyudmila Kondratyeva (URS) 1984  Evelyn Ashford (USA) 1988  Florence Griffith-Joyner (USA) 1992  Gail Devers (USA) 1996  Gail Devers (USA) 2000 Vacant 2004  Yulia Nestsiarenka (BLR) 2008  Shelly-Ann Fraser (JAM) 2012  Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) 2016  Elaine Thompson (JAM) v t e Olympic champions in women's 200 metres 1948  Fanny Blankers-Koen (NED) 1952  Marjorie Jackson (AUS) 1956  Betty Cuthbert (AUS) 1960  Wilma Rudolph (USA) 1964  Edith McGuire (USA) 1968  Irena Szewińska (POL) 1972  Renate Stecher (GDR) 1976  Bärbel Eckert (GDR) 1980  Bärbel Eckert (GDR) 1984  Valerie Brisco-Hooks (USA) 1988  Florence Griffith-Joyner (USA) 1992  Gwen Torrence (USA) 1996  Marie-José Pérec (FRA) 2000  Pauline Davis-Thompson (BAH) 2004  Veronica Campbell (JAM) 2008  Veronica Campbell-Brown (JAM) 2012  Allyson Felix (USA) 2016  Elaine Thompson (JAM) v t e Olympic champions in women's 4×100 m relay 1928  Rosenfeld, Smith, Bell, Cook (CAN) 1932  Carew, Furtsch, Rogers, von Bremen (USA) 1936  Bland, Rogers, Robinson, Stephens (USA) 1948  Stad-de Jong, Witziers-Timmer, van der Kade-Koudijs, Blankers-Koen (NED) 1952  Faggs, Jones, Moreau, Hardy (USA) 1956  Strickland de la Hunty, Croker, Mellor, Cuthbert (AUS) 1960  Hudson, Williams, Jones, Rudolph (USA) 1964  Ciepły, Kirszenstein, Górecka, Kłobukowska (POL) 1968  Ferrell, Bailes, Netter, Tyus (USA) 1972  Krause, Mickler, Richter, Rosendahl (FRG) 1976  Göhr, Stecher, Bodendorf, Wöckel (GDR) 1980  Müller, Wöckel, Auerswald, Göhr (GDR) 1984  Brown, Bolden, Cheeseborough, Ashford (USA) 1988  Brown, Echols, Griffith Joyner, Ashford (USA) 1992  Ashford, Jones, Guidry, Torrence, Finn (USA) 1996  Devers, Miller, Gaines, Torrence, Guidry (USA) 2000  Fynes, Sturrup, Davis-Thompson, Ferguson, Lewis (BAH) 2004  Lawrence, Simpson, Bailey, Campbell, McDonald (JAM) 2008  Borlée, Mariën, Ouédraogo, Gevaert (BEL) 2012  Madison, Felix, Knight, Jeter, Tarmoh, Williams (USA) 2016  Bartoletta, Felix, Bowie, Gardner, Akinosun (USA) v t e IAAF World Athlete of the Year (women) Florence Griffith Joyner (1988) Ana Fidelia Quirot (1989) Merlene Ottey (1990) Katrin Krabbe (1991) Heike Henkel (1992) Sally Gunnell (1993) Jackie Joyner-Kersee (1994) Gwen Torrence (1995) Svetlana Masterkova (1996) Marion Jones (1997–98) Gabriela Szabo (1999) Marion Jones (2000) Stacy Dragila (2001) Paula Radcliffe (2002) Hestrie Cloete (2003) Yelena Isinbayeva (2004–05) Sanya Richards (2006) Meseret Defar (2007) Yelena Isinbayeva (2008) Sanya Richards (2009) Blanka Vlašić (2010) Sally Pearson (2011) Allyson Felix (2012) Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (2013) Valerie Adams (2014) Genzebe Dibaba (2015) Almaz Ayana (2016) Nafissatou Thiam (2017) v t e James E. Sullivan Award winners 1930: Jones 1931: Berlinger 1932: Bausch 1933: Cunningham 1934: Bonthron 1935: Little 1936: Morris 1937: Budge 1938: Lash 1939: Burk 1940: Rice 1941: MacMitchell 1942: Warmerdam 1943: Dodds 1944: Curtis 1945: Blanchard 1946: Tucker 1947: Kelly Jr. 1948: Mathias 1949: Button 1950: Wilt 1951: Richards 1952: Ashenfelter 1953: Lee 1954: Whitfield 1955: Dillard 1956: McCormick 1957: Morrow 1958: Davis 1959: O'Brien 1960: R. Johnson 1961: Rudolph 1962: Beatty 1963: Pennel 1964: Schollander 1965: Bradley 1966: Ryun 1967: Matson 1968: Meyer 1969: Toomey 1970: Kinsella 1971: Spitz 1972: Shorter 1973: Walton 1974: Wohlhuter 1975: Shaw 1976: Jenner 1977: Naber 1978: Caulkins 1979: Thomas 1980: Heiden 1981: Lewis 1982: Decker 1983: Moses 1984: Louganis 1985: Benoit 1986: Joyner-Kersee 1987: Abbott 1988: Griffith-Joyner 1989: Evans 1990: Smith 1991: Powell 1992: Blair 1993: Ward 1994: Jansen 1995: Baumgartner 1996: M. Johnson 1997: Manning 1998: Holdsclaw 1999: C. Miller & K. Miller 2000: Gardner 2001: Kwan 2002: Hughes 2003: Phelps 2004: Hamm 2005: Redick 2006: Long 2007: Tebow 2008: S. Johnson 2009: Palmeiro-Winters 2010: Lysacek 2011: Rodriguez 2012: Franklin 2013: Urschel 2014: Elliott 2015: Stewart & Reynolds 2016: Carlini v t e 1984 USA Olympic Track & Field Team Qualification 1984 United States Olympic Trials (track and field) Men's track & road athletes Ray Armstead Alonzo Babers Kirk Baptiste Ron Brown Tonie Campbell Don Clary Paul Cummings Brian Diemer Marco Evoniuk Greg Foster Sam Graddy Johnny Gray John Gregorek Danny Harris Tranel Hawkins Jim Heiring Thomas Jefferson Earl Jones Roger Kingdom Steve Lacy Carl Lewis Henry Marsh John Marshall Antonio McKay Walter McCoy Edwin Moses Sunder Nix Daniel O'Connor Vince O'Sullivan Doug Padilla Pete Pfitzinger Pat Porter Alberto Salazar Carl Schueler Steve Scott Calvin Smith Willie Smith Jim Spivey John Tuttle Craig Virgin Men's field athletes Duncan Atwood Willie Banks Earl Bell Tim Bright Edward Burke Art Burns Michael Carter Mike Conley, Sr. John Crist Milton Goode Bill Green Al Joyner Dave Laut Carl Lewis Jud Logan Doug Lytle Mike McRae Larry Myricks Doug Nordquist Tom Petranoff John Powell Steve Roller Dwight Stones Mike Tully Mac Wilkins Augie Wolf Jim Wooding Women's track & road athletes Evelyn Ashford Sharrieffa Barksdale Joan Benoit Jeanette Bolden Cindy Bremser Valerie Brisco-Hooks Alice Brown Judi Brown Julie Brown Robin Campbell Chandra Cheeseborough Mary Decker Diane Dixon Benita Fitzgerald-Brown Kim Gallagher Randy Givens Florence Griffith Joyner Joan Hansen Denean Howard Sherri Howard Julie Isphording Missy Kane Lillie Leatherwood Pam Page Diana Richburg Kim Turner Angela Wright-Scott Ruth Wysocki Women's field athletes Jodi Anderson Carol Cady Laura De Snoo Leslie Deniz Cindy Greiner Lorna Griffin Joni Huntley Jackie Joyner Carol Lewis Ramona Pagel Louise Ritter Karin Smith Pam Spencer Lynda Sutfin Cathy Sulinski Angela Thacker Coaches — v t e 1988 USA Olympic Track & Field Team Qualification 1988 United States Olympic Trials (track and field) Men's track & road athletes Brian Abshire Jeff Atkinson Tracy Baskin Bruce Bickford Arthur Blake Terry Brahm Tonie Campbell Mark Conover Mark Deady Joe DeLoach Brian Diemer Danny Everett Mark Everett Marco Evoniuk Ed Eyestone Johnny Gray Jim Heiring Andy Kaestner Roger Kingdom Carl Lewis Steve Lewis Tim Lewis Sydney Maree Henry Marsh Roy Martin Antonio McKay (r) Lee McNeill (r) Dennis Mitchell Gary Morgan Edwin Moses Doug Padilla Pete Pfitzinger Andre Phillips Steve Plasencia Pat Porter Butch Reynolds Albert Robinson (r) Kevin Robinzine (r) Carl Schueler Steve Scott Calvin Smith Andrew Valmon (r) Kevin Young Men's field athletes Willie Banks Randy Barnes Earl Bell Tim Bright Mike Buncic Robert Cannon Hollis Conway Brian Crouser Lance Deal Jim Doehring Ken Flax Randy Heisler Jim Howard Dave Johnson Gary Kinder Carl Lewis Jud Logan Larry Myricks Billy Olson Tom Petranoff Mike Powell Charles Simpkins Brian Stanton Dave Stephens Gregg Tafralis Kory Tarpenning Mac Wilkins Women's track & road athletes Evelyn Ashford Valerie Brisco Alice Brown (r) Joetta Clark Gail Devers-Roberts Nancy Ditz Diane Dixon Sheila Echols (r) Kim Gallagher Margaret Groos Denean Howard-Hill Sherri Howard (r) Vicki Huber Jacqueline Humphrey Regina Jacobs Lynn Jennings Florence Griffith Joyner Francie Larrieu-Smith Lillie Leatherwood (r) Pam Marshall LaVonna Martin Leslie Maxie Lynn Nelson Cathy O'Brien PattiSue Plumer LaTanya Sheffield Mary Decker Slaney Gwen Torrence Delisa Walton-Floyd Schowonda Williams Dannette Young (r) Women's field athletes Wendy Brown Carol Cady Bonnie Dasse Sheila Echols Cindy Greiner Jackie Joyner-Kersee Trish King Carol Lewis Donna Mayhew Ramona Pagel Connie Price Louise Ritter Karin Smith Coleen Sommer Lynda Sutfin Coaches Stan Huntsman (men's head coach) Dean Hayes (men's assistant coach) Irving "Moon" Mondschein (men's assistant coach) Tom Pagani (men's assistant coach) Russ Rogers (men's assistant coach) Joe Vigil (men's assistant coach) Terry Crawford (women's head coach) Ken Foreman (women's assistant coach) Dave Rodda (women's assistant coach) Fred Thompson (women's assistant coach) v t e Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year 1931: Helene Madison 1932: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1933: Helen Jacobs 1934: Virginia Van Wie 1935: Helen Wills 1936: Helen Stephens 1937: Katherine Rawls 1938: Patty Berg 1939: Alice Marble 1940: Alice Marble 1941: Betty Hicks 1942: Gloria Callen 1943: Patty Berg 1944: Ann Curtis 1945: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1946: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1947: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen 1949: Marlene Hagge 1950: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1951: Maureen Connolly 1952: Maureen Connolly 1953: Maureen Connolly 1954: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1955: Patty Berg 1956: Pat McCormick 1957: Althea Gibson 1958: Althea Gibson 1959: Maria Bueno 1960: Wilma Rudolph 1961: Wilma Rudolph 1962: Dawn Fraser 1963: Mickey Wright 1964: Mickey Wright 1965: Kathy Whitworth 1966: Kathy Whitworth 1967: Billie Jean King 1968: Peggy Fleming 1969: Debbie Meyer 1970: Chi Cheng 1971: Evonne Goolagong 1972: Olga Korbut 1973: Billie Jean King 1974: Chris Evert 1975: Chris Evert 1976: Nadia Comăneci 1977: Chris Evert 1978: Nancy Lopez 1979: Tracy Austin 1980: Chris Evert 1981: Tracy Austin 1982: Mary Decker 1983: Martina Navratilova 1984: Mary Lou Retton 1985: Nancy Lopez 1986: Martina Navratilova 1987: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1988: Florence Griffith-Joyner 1989: Steffi Graf 1990: Beth Daniel 1991: Monica Seles 1992: Monica Seles 1993: Sheryl Swoopes 1994: Bonnie Blair 1995: Rebecca Lobo 1996: Amy Van Dyken 1997: Martina Hingis 1998: Pak Se-ri 1999: United States women's national soccer team 2000: Marion Jones 2001: Jennifer Capriati 2002: Serena Williams 2003: Annika Sörenstam 2004: Annika Sörenstam 2005: Annika Sörenstam 2006: Lorena Ochoa 2007: Lorena Ochoa 2008: Candace Parker 2009: Serena Williams 2010: Lindsey Vonn 2011: Abby Wambach 2012: Gabby Douglas 2013: Serena Williams 2014: Mo'ne Davis 2015: Serena Williams 2016: Simone Biles 2017: Katie Ledecky Authority control WorldCat Identities VIAF: 54311932 LCCN: n88258740 ISNI: 0000 0001 1645 3571 SUDOC: 050844334 BNF: cb13557239r (data) BNE: XX1613470 Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Florence_Griffith_Joyner&oldid=826626724" Categories: American female sprinters1959 births1998 deathsSportspeople from Los AngelesTrack and field athletes from CaliforniaOlympic track and field athletes of the United StatesAthletes (track and field) at the 1984 Summer OlympicsAthletes (track and field) at the 1988 Summer OlympicsOlympic gold medalists for the United States in track and fieldOlympic silver medalists for the United States in track and fieldWorld Championships in Athletics medalistsIAAF world record holdersCalifornia State University, Northridge alumniJames E. Sullivan Award recipientsUCLA Bruins women's track and field athletesDeaths from epilepsyDeaths from asphyxiationNeurological disease deaths in the United StatesPeople from Watts, Los AngelesMedalists at the 1988 Summer OlympicsMedalists at the 1984 Summer OlympicsHidden categories: Webarchive template wayback linksCS1 Portuguese-language sources (pt)Use mdy dates from May 2014Pages using Infobox sportsperson with unknown parametersAll articles with unsourced statementsArticles with unsourced statements from August 2016Find a Grave template with ID same as WikidataWikipedia articles with VIAF identifiersWikipedia articles with LCCN identifiersWikipedia articles with ISNI identifiersWikipedia articles with BNF identifiers


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United States National Athletics TeamLittlerock, CaliforniaUnited StatesMission ViejoCaliforniaUnited States100 Meters200 MetersUnited StatesOlympic Games1988 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres Relay1984 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1984 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 400 Metres RelayIAAF World Championships In Athletics1987 World Championships In Athletics1987 World Championships In Athletics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres Relay1987 World Championships In Athletics – Women's 200 MetresTrack And Field100 M200 MCalifornia State University, NorthridgeUniversity Of California, Los Angeles1980 Summer Olympics1980 Summer Olympics Boycott1988 Summer OlympicsEpileptic SeizureLos Angeles, CaliforniaLittlerock, CaliforniaJordan DownsWatts, Los AngelesJordan High School (Los Angeles, California)CIF California State MeetAlice Brown (athlete)Pam MarshallCalifornia State University At NorthridgeBob KerseeJeanette BoldenUniversity Of California, Los Angeles1980 Summer OlympicsU.S. Government1980 Summer Olympics BoycottUCLABachelor's DegreePsychology1983 World Championships In Athletics1984 United States Olympic Trials (track And Field)Evelyn AshfordSilver Medal1984 Summer OlympicsIAAF Grand Prix FinalAl JoynerTriple Jump1987 World Championships In AthleticsRomeTrack & Field News1988 United States Olympic Trials (track And Field)CologneWikipedia:Citation NeededSan DiegoEvelyn AshfordSanta Monica1988 United States Olympic Trials (track And Field)Association Of Track And Field StatisticiansUniversity Of California, Irvine1988 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 400 Metres RelayFanny Blankers-KoenJames E. Sullivan AwardLJNIndiana PacersNBAPresident's Council On Fitness, Sports, And Nutrition227 (TV Series)Santa Barbara (TV Series)Annie LeibovitzCharlie Rose (TV Series)Joaquim CruzAl JoynerBob KerseeDarrell RobinsonHGHCarl LewisPrince Alexandre De MerodeManfred DonikeGreg Foster (hurdler)1984 Summer OlympicsAl JoynerJackie Joyner-KerseeMission Viejo, CaliforniaCoronerEpilepticCavernous HemangiomaTonic–clonic SeizureAcetominophenBenadrylUSA Track & FieldNational Track And Field Hall Of FameArt Of The OlympiansAl OerterHistory Of African Americans In Los AngelesEvelyn AshfordInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0-313-37642-5International Standard Serial NumberESPN.comInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard Serial NumberInternational Standard 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MetresRenate StecherEast Germany At The 1972 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1976 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresAnnegret RichterWest Germany At The 1976 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1980 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresLyudmila KondratyevaSoviet Union At The 1980 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1984 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresEvelyn AshfordUnited States At The 1984 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresFlorence Griffith-JoynerUnited States At The 1988 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1992 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresGail DeversUnited States At The 1992 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1996 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresGail DeversUnited States At The 1996 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresAthletics At The 2004 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresYulia NestsiarenkaBelarus At The 2004 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2008 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 MetresShelly-Ann 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200 MetresIrena SzewińskaPoland At The 1968 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1972 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresRenate StecherEast Germany At The 1972 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1976 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresBärbel WöckelEast Germany At The 1976 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1980 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresBärbel WöckelEast Germany At The 1980 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1984 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresValerie Brisco-HooksUnited States At The 1984 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresFlorence Griffith-JoynerUnited States At The 1988 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1992 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresGwen TorrenceUnited States At The 1992 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1996 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresMarie-José PérecFrance At The 1996 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresPauline Davis-ThompsonBahamas At The 1996 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2004 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresVeronica Campbell-BrownJamaica At The 2004 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2008 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresVeronica Campbell-BrownJamaica At The 2008 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresAllyson FelixUnited States At The 2012 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 MetresElaine ThompsonJamaica At The 2016 Summer OlympicsTemplate:Footer Olympic Champions 4x100 M WomenTemplate Talk:Footer Olympic Champions 4x100 M Women4×100 Metres Relay At The OlympicsAthletics At The 1928 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayBobbie RosenfeldEthel Smith (athlete)Jane BellMyrtle CookCanada At The 1928 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1932 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayMary CarewEvelyn FurtschAnnette RogersWilhelmina Von BremenUnited States At The 1932 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1936 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayHarriet BlandAnnette RogersBetty RobinsonHelen StephensUnited States At The 1936 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1948 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayXenia Stad-de JongNetti Witziers-TimmerGerda Van Der Kade-KoudijsFanny Blankers-KoenNetherlands At The 1948 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1952 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayMae FaggsBarbara Jones (athlete)Janet MoreauCatherine Hardy LavenderUnited States At The 1952 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1956 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayShirley StricklandNorma CrokerFleur MellorBetty CuthbertAustralia At The 1956 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1960 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayMartha HudsonLucinda Williams (athlete)Barbara Jones (athlete)Wilma RudolphUnited States At The 1960 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1964 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayTeresa CiepłyIrena SzewińskaHalina GóreckaEwa KłobukowskaPoland At The 1964 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1968 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayBarbara FerrellMargaret BailesMildrette NetterWyomia TyusUnited States At The 1968 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1972 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayChristiane KrauseIngrid BeckerAnnegret RichterHeide RosendahlWest Germany At The 1972 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1976 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayMarlies GöhrRenate StecherCarla BodendorfBärbel WöckelEast Germany At The 1976 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1980 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayRomy MüllerBärbel WöckelIngrid AuerswaldMarlies GöhrEast Germany At The 1980 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1984 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayAlice Brown (athlete)Jeanette BoldenChandra CheeseboroughEvelyn AshfordUnited States At The 1984 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayAlice Brown (athlete)Sheila EcholsEvelyn AshfordUnited States At The 1988 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1992 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayEvelyn AshfordEsther Jones (athlete)Carlette Guidry-WhiteGwen TorrenceMichelle Finn-BurrellUnited States At The 1992 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 1996 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayGail DeversInger MillerChryste GainesGwen TorrenceCarlette Guidry-WhiteUnited States At The 1996 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelaySavatheda FynesChandra SturrupPauline Davis-ThompsonDebbie Ferguson-McKenzieEldece Clarke-LewisBahamas At The 2000 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2004 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayTayna LawrenceSherone SimpsonAleen BaileyVeronica Campbell-BrownBeverly McDonaldJamaica At The 2004 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2008 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayOlivia BorléeHanna MariënÉlodie OuédraogoKim GevaertBelgium At The 2008 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayTianna BartolettaAllyson FelixBianca KnightCarmelita JeterJeneba TarmohLauryn WilliamsUnited States At The 2012 Summer OlympicsAthletics At The 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 Metres RelayTianna BartolettaAllyson FelixTori BowieEnglish GardnerMorolake AkinosunUnited States At The 2016 Summer OlympicsTemplate:IAAF World Athlete Of The Year (women)Template Talk:IAAF World Athlete Of The Year (women)IAAF World Athlete Of The YearAna Fidelia QuirotMerlene OtteyKatrin KrabbeHeike HenkelSally GunnellJackie Joyner-KerseeGwen TorrenceSvetlana MasterkovaMarion JonesGabriela SzaboMarion JonesStacy DragilaPaula RadcliffeHestrie CloeteYelena IsinbayevaSanya Richards-RossMeseret DefarYelena IsinbayevaSanya Richards-RossBlanka VlašićSally PearsonAllyson FelixShelly-Ann Fraser-PryceValerie AdamsGenzebe DibabaAlmaz AyanaNafissatou ThiamTemplate:Sullivan Award WinnersTemplate Talk:Sullivan Award WinnersJames E. Sullivan AwardBobby Jones (golfer)Barney BerlingerJames BauschGlenn Cunningham (athlete)Bill BonthronLawson LittleGlenn MorrisDon BudgeDon LashJoe BurkGreg Rice (athlete)Leslie MacMitchellCornelius WarmerdamGil DoddsAnn CurtisDoc BlanchardY. Arnold TuckerJohn B. Kelly Jr.Bob MathiasDick ButtonFred WiltBob RichardsHorace AshenfelterSammy Lee (diver)Mal WhitfieldHarrison DillardPat McCormick (diver)Bobby MorrowGlenn Davis (athlete)Parry O'BrienRafer JohnsonWilma RudolphJim BeattyJohn PennelDon SchollanderBill BradleyJim RyunRandy MatsonDebbie MeyerBill ToomeyJohn Kinsella (swimmer)Mark SpitzFrank ShorterBill WaltonRick WohlhuterTim Shaw (swimmer)Caitlyn JennerJohn NaberTracy CaulkinsKurt Thomas (gymnast)Eric HeidenCarl LewisMary DeckerEdwin MosesGreg LouganisJoan BenoitJackie Joyner-KerseeJim AbbottFlorence Griffith-JoynerJanet EvansJohn Smith (wrestler)Mike Powell (athlete)Bonnie BlairCharlie WardDan JansenBruce BaumgartnerMichael Johnson (sprinter)Peyton ManningChamique HoldsclawCoco MillerKelly Miller (basketball)Rulon GardnerMichelle KwanSarah HughesMichael PhelpsPaul HammJ. J. RedickJessica LongTim TebowShawn JohnsonAmy Palmiero-WintersEvan LysacekAndrew Rodriguez (American Football)Missy FranklinJohn UrschelEzekiel ElliottBreanna StewartKeenan Reynolds (American Football)Template:Footer USA Track & Field 1984 Summer OlympicsTemplate Talk:Footer USA Track & Field 1984 Summer OlympicsUnited States At The 1984 Summer Olympics1984 United States Olympic Trials (track And Field)Ray ArmsteadAlonzo BabersKirk BaptisteRon Brown (American Football)Tonie CampbellDon ClaryPaul CummingsBrian DiemerMarco EvoniukGreg Foster (hurdler)Sam GraddyJohnny GrayJohn GregorekDanny HarrisTranel HawkinsJim HeiringThomas Jefferson (athlete)Earl Jones (athlete)Roger KingdomSteve Lacy (athlete)Carl LewisHenry Marsh (athlete)John Marshall (athlete)Antonio McKayWalter McCoy (athlete)Edwin MosesSunder NixDaniel O'Connor (athlete)Vince O'SullivanDoug PadillaPete PfitzingerPat PorterAlberto SalazarCarl SchuelerSteve Scott (athlete)Calvin SmithWillie Smith (sprinter)Jim SpiveyJohn Tuttle (athlete)Craig VirginDuncan AtwoodWillie BanksEarl BellTim BrightEdward Burke (athlete)Art BurnsMichael Carter (athlete)Mike Conley, Sr.John CristMilton GoodeBill Green (hammer Thrower)Al JoynerDave LautCarl LewisJud LoganDoug LytleMike McRaeLarry MyricksDoug NordquistTom PetranoffJohn Powell (athlete)Steve RollerDwight StonesMike TullyMac WilkinsAugie WolfJim WoodingEvelyn AshfordSharrieffa BarksdaleJoan BenoitJeanette BoldenCindy BremserValerie Brisco-HooksAlice Brown (athlete)Judi BrownJulie Brown (athlete)Robin Campbell (athlete)Chandra CheeseboroughMary DeckerDiane DixonBenita Fitzgerald-BrownKim GallagherRandy GivensJoan HansenDenean HowardSherri HowardJulie IsphordingMissy KaneLillie LeatherwoodPam PageDiana RichburgKim TurnerAngela Wright-ScottRuth WysockiJodi AndersonCarol CadyLaura De SnooLeslie DenizCindy GreinerLorna GriffinJoni HuntleyJackie Joyner-KerseeCarol LewisRamona PagelLouise RitterKarin SmithPam SpencerLynda SutfinCathy SulinskiAngela ThackerTemplate:Footer USA Track & Field 1988 Summer OlympicsTemplate Talk:Footer USA Track & Field 1988 Summer OlympicsUnited States At The 1988 Summer Olympics1988 United States Olympic Trials (track And Field)Brian AbshireJeff Atkinson (athlete)Tracy BaskinBruce Bickford (athlete)Arthur Blake (hurdler)Terry BrahmTonie CampbellMark ConoverMark DeadyJoe DeLoachBrian DiemerDanny EverettMark Everett (athlete)Marco EvoniukEd EyestoneJohnny GrayJim HeiringAndy KaestnerRoger KingdomCarl LewisSteve Lewis (sprinter)Tim Lewis (athlete)Sydney MareeHenry Marsh (athlete)Roy Martin (sprinter)Antonio McKayLee McNeillDennis MitchellGary Morgan (athlete)Edwin MosesDoug PadillaPete PfitzingerAndre PhillipsSteve PlasenciaPat PorterButch ReynoldsAlbert Robinson (athlete)Kevin RobinzineCarl SchuelerSteve Scott (athlete)Calvin SmithAndrew ValmonKevin Young (hurdler)Willie BanksRandy BarnesEarl BellTim BrightMike BuncicRobert Cannon (athlete)Hollis ConwayBrian CrouserLance DealJim DoehringKen FlaxRandy HeislerJim Howard (athlete)Dave Johnson (decathlete)Gary KinderCarl LewisJud LoganLarry MyricksBilly OlsonTom PetranoffMike Powell (long Jumper)Charles SimpkinsBrian Stanton (athlete)Dave Stephens (javelin Thrower)Gregg TafralisKory TarpenningMac WilkinsEvelyn AshfordValerie Brisco-HooksAlice Brown (athlete)Joetta Clark DiggsGail DeversNancy DitzDiane DixonSheila EcholsKim GallagherMargaret GroosDenean HowardSherri HowardVicki HuberJacqueline HumphreyRegina JacobsLynn JenningsFrancie Larrieu SmithLillie LeatherwoodPam MarshallLaVonna MartinLeslie MaxieLynn Nelson (athlete)Cathy O'Brien (athlete)PattiSue PlumerLaTanya SheffieldMary DeckerGwen TorrenceDelisa Walton-FloydSchowonda WilliamsDannette YoungWendy Brown (heptathlete)Carol CadyBonnie DasseSheila EcholsCindy GreinerJackie Joyner-KerseeTrish KingCarol LewisDonna MayhewRamona PagelConnie Price-SmithLouise RitterKarin SmithColeen SommerLynda SutfinStan HuntsmanIrving MondscheinTemplate:Associated Press Female Athlete Of The Year NavboxTemplate 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