Contents 1 Background 2 Early career 2.1 Firing from the News & Observer 3 LA Times 3.1 2008 Zell lawsuit 4 References 5 External links


Background[edit] This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (April 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Neil was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on January 12, 1960, and moved to New Bern, North Carolina, at age 4. His father was an engineer with Stanley Powertools and his mother was a private investigator.[8] He received a B.A. degree in Creative Writing from East Carolina University and an M.A. degree in English Literature from North Carolina State University. Neil is married to Tina Larsen Neil and has twin daughters, Rosalind and Vivienne — as well as a son, Henry (Hank) Neil, from his first marriage. He lived in Los Angeles before moving again to North Carolina, when he left the L.A. Times and began writing for The Wall Street Journal.[citation needed]


Early career[edit] This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (April 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Neil began his professional writing career with the Spectator, a local free weekly, and began working for The News & Observer of Raleigh, North Carolina as a newsroom copy editor in 1989. In interviews he has said his goals at the time were to "learn to write and see the world." Neil was recruited by AutoWeek magazine in 1994 as a senior contributing editor. In 1995, he began contributing reviews to the New York Times, which he continued until 2003. Beginning with his work at The News & Observer, Neil developed his writing style, combining humor with pragmatic insight, literary analogies and personal experience. Neil worked with the Raleigh paper until 1996, when he was fired. He subsequently worked as a free-lance journalist, including five years as contributing editor to Car and Driver. In 1999 Neil was named senior contributing editor for Expedia Travels, a glossy travel magazine. In 2001, Neil won the Ken Purdy Award for Excellence in Automotive Journalism, from the International Motor Press Association. In 2002, his work was selected for Houghton Mifflin's Best American Sports Writing. In 2004 he was anthologized in the Best American Newspaper Writing. Firing from the News & Observer[edit] In 1991, Dan Neil had been moved from the newsroom of the News & Observer to the classified advertising department with the expectation "that he would write dealer-friendly pieces to attract readers to the newspaper's automobile classified section."[9] In contrast to the newsroom, where Neil had worked with editors, he noticed his copy was no longer edited.[9] "For seven years, I had unfettered access to 200,000 readers."[9] Neil's writing eventually reflected the lack of constraint.[9] Neil's January 1996 review of the Ford Expedition described a back-seat encounter with his girlfriend,[5] writing "this was loving, consensual and — given the Expedition's dual airbags, side impact beams and standard four-wheel anti-lock brakes — safe sex."[9] The News and Observer reported Neil's recollection of the column in an interview years later: "I wrote at some point about the kids getting into the Ford Expedition and commenting on the 'footprints' on the windshield. Well, that was just it! People went crazy! It was kind of like Janet Jackson's costume malfunction -- a none too daring transgression, overall, but the thing that finally sent people over the edge."[10] Put on probation for the article, Neil was instructed to have his articles reviewed by an editor as well as the director of classified auto advertising.[9] Refusing, he was subsequently fired,[9] and wrote in a later Durham Independent article that he was fired "for refusing to have my column vetted by the classified advertising department."[11] Editors from The News & Observer contended that it was disingenuous to suggest that advertisers pressured the paper into firing Neil,[11] since Neil worked for an advertorial section of the advertising department at the time.[11] The incident highlighted the growing issue that newspapers, under economic pressure, have in maintaining the virtual wall between the "church" of news gathering and the "state" of advertising sales, sometimes known as a Chinese wall.[6][9] Notably, Keith Bradsher — author of a book about SUV's called High and Mighty — indicated that among critics, "auto reviewers are the most likely to be compromised by the industry they cover."[6] Speaking in a 2005 radio interview with Brooke Gladstone, after receiving the Pulitzer Prize, Neil described the symbiotic relationship between the automobile industry and its critics: "The entire environment is incestuous. They introduce new cars. They fly journalists in and put them up at really nice hotels and, you know, treat them to experiences that they would never possibly in a million years — they wouldn't even be allowed in these hotels ordinarily. You know, and that's not supposed to affect their judgment. But it is a compromised business, and it is also true that newspapers are under a great deal of revenue pressure on this score, and so yeah, a favorable editorial/advertorial content is often created to satisfy that need."[6][dead link]


LA Times[edit] In September 2003, Neil became a full-time columnist for the Los Angeles Times and gained a following for his approach to automotive writing, which routinely included industry criticism — including criticism of automakers themselves and government emissions and safety policies. In February 2005, he began writing 800 Words, a column about pop culture, for the Los Angeles Times Magazine. The column was syndicated by Tribune Media in 2006. Neil won the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors award for best general commentary column in 2007. 800 Words was discontinued in 2008 after the Los Angeles Times Magazine was transferred from the editorial department to the paper's business division — and advertiser control. In February 2010, Neil left the L.A. Times and accepted a position at the Wall Street Journal.[2] 2008 Zell lawsuit[edit] In 2008, Neil participated in a federal class action suit against Sam Zell, who in 2007 purchased the Tribune Company, owner of the Los Angeles Times.[12] After the takeover, Zell rated reporters by how many column inches they produced, relinquished the Los Angeles Times Magazine and other editorial publications to advertiser control — and laid off at least 1,000 employees.[12] Neil called Zell "a corporate raider," adding "he's not a publisher. Newspapers are too important to the public to be treated as just pieces on a financial chessboard."[13] Neil and a group of Times employees claimed violations of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and alleged that Zell breached his duty of loyalty to Tribune's employees.[13] Forbes described the suit as putting "the fast-changing newspaper business on trial," noting "newspapers have been under siege since the technology bubble popped in the late 1990s, with problems ranging from declining circulation, advertiser consolidation, classified ads migrating online, rising newsprint costs, bloated debt structures and, yes, over-staffing. Not to mention the rise of Internet news."[12]


References[edit] ^ "Wall Street Journal Auto Columnist Dan Neil Joins FOXSports.com on MSN". Sports Media News.  ^ a b "Pulitzer winner Dan Neil reportedly leaves Los Angeles Times for Wall Street Journal". Autoblog.com, Jeremy Korzeniewski, Feb 5th 2010.  ^ "The Car Show with Adam Carolla: First impressions from the set". Autoblog.com, July 12, 2011, Michael Harley.  ^ "Ken Purdy Award Recipients". International Motor Press Association.  ^ a b c "Some Highish Brows Furrow as a Car Critic Gets a Pulitzer". The New York Times, April 8, 2004, David Carr. April 8, 2004. Archived from the original on July 24, 2013. Retrieved April 30, 2010.  ^ a b c d "Interview with Brooke Gladstone & Dan Neil: A Perfect Vehicle for Criticism". Onthemedia.org, April 15, 2005.  Missing or empty |url= (help)[dead link] ^ "Dan Neil Interview". Askmen.com.  ^ "Best Newspaper Writing 2004: The Nation's Best Journalism". The Pointer Institute and Bonus Books, 2004, Keith Woods.  ^ a b c d e f g h "Close gaps in wall between ads, unpaid information". USAtoday.com, April 20, 2004, Philip Meyer. April 20, 2004. Retrieved April 30, 2010.  ^ "Critics abound, but this one is different". The News & Observer, A.C. Snow, May 02, 2004, modified Oct 23, 2005. Archived from the original on 2013-02-08.  ^ a b c "Sidebar to Neil's Pulitzer*". LAobserved.com, Kevin Roderick, April 6, 2004.  ^ a b c "Putting Newspapers On Trial". Forbes.com, James Erik Abels, 09.17.08. September 17, 2008.  ^ a b "'L.A. Times' Refugees Sue for Control of Paper". Portfolio.com, Sep 16 2008. 


External links[edit] Rumble Seat at The Wall Street Journal. v t e Pulitzer Prize for Criticism (2001–2025) Gail Caldwell (2001) Justin Davidson (2002) Stephen Hunter (2003) Dan Neil (2004) Joe Morgenstern (2005) Robin Givhan (2006) Jonathan Gold (2007) Mark Feeney (2008) Holland Cotter (2009) Sarah Kaufman (2010) Sebastian Smee (2011) Wesley Morris (2012) Philip Kennicott (2013) Inga Saffron (2014) Mary McNamara (2015) Emily Nussbaum (2016) Hilton Als (2017) Complete list (1970–1975) (1976–2000) (2001–2025) Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dan_Neil&oldid=809047229" Categories: 1960 birthsMotoring journalistsAmerican columnistsLos Angeles Times peoplePulitzer Prize for Criticism winnersEast Carolina University alumniLiving peoplePeople from New Bern, North CarolinaThe Wall Street Journal peopleHidden categories: Pages using web citations with no URLAll articles with dead external linksArticles with dead external links from December 2012Articles that may contain original research from April 2013All articles that may contain original researchAll articles with unsourced statementsArticles with unsourced statements from June 2016


Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog in Namespaces ArticleTalk Variants Views ReadEditView history More Search Navigation Main pageContentsFeatured contentCurrent eventsRandom articleDonate to WikipediaWikipedia store Interaction HelpAbout WikipediaCommunity portalRecent changesContact page Tools What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationWikidata itemCite this page Print/export Create a bookDownload as PDFPrintable version Languages Add links This page was last edited on 6 November 2017, at 20:39. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Contact Wikipedia Developers Cookie statement Mobile view (window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgPageParseReport":{"limitreport":{"cputime":"0.236","walltime":"0.318","ppvisitednodes":{"value":1627,"limit":1000000},"ppgeneratednodes":{"value":0,"limit":1500000},"postexpandincludesize":{"value":43568,"limit":2097152},"templateargumentsize":{"value":2208,"limit":2097152},"expansiondepth":{"value":18,"limit":40},"expensivefunctioncount":{"value":3,"limit":500},"entityaccesscount":{"value":0,"limit":400},"timingprofile":["100.00% 288.569 1 -total"," 35.81% 103.339 1 Template:Reflist"," 21.38% 61.698 10 Template:Cite_web"," 21.12% 60.939 1 Template:Infobox_writer"," 15.08% 43.512 1 Template:Infobox"," 12.51% 36.090 3 Template:Fix"," 11.86% 34.215 2 Template:Original_research"," 11.50% 33.179 1 Template:Cn"," 9.84% 28.394 2 Template:Ambox"," 8.68% 25.038 1 Template:For"]},"scribunto":{"limitreport-timeusage":{"value":"0.113","limit":"10.000"},"limitreport-memusage":{"value":4406750,"limit":52428800}},"cachereport":{"origin":"mw1261","timestamp":"20180222180607","ttl":3600,"transientcontent":true}}});});(window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgBackendResponseTime":98,"wgHostname":"mw1250"});});


Dan_Neil - Photos and All Basic Informations

Dan_Neil More Links

Dan Neil (American Football)Harrisburg, PennsylvaniaThe Wall Street JournalLos Angeles TimesAutoWeekCar And DriverAdam CarollaSpeed ChannelInternational Motor Press AssociationPulitzer Prize For CriticismBrooke GladstoneOscar WildeWikipedia:No Original ResearchWikipedia:VerifiabilityWikipedia:Citing SourcesHelp:Maintenance Template RemovalNew Bern, North CarolinaStanley Black & DeckerEast Carolina UniversityEnglish LiteratureNorth Carolina State UniversityWikipedia:Citation NeededWikipedia:No Original ResearchWikipedia:VerifiabilityWikipedia:Citing SourcesHelp:Maintenance Template RemovalIndependent WeeklyThe News & ObserverRaleigh, North CarolinaAutoWeekNew York TimesLiteratureCar And DriverFord ExpeditionJanet JacksonWardrobe MalfunctionAdvertorialFuture Of NewspapersChinese WallKeith BradsherSUVHigh And Mighty (book)Brooke GladstoneWikipedia:Link RotWall Street JournalSam ZellTribune CompanyLos Angeles TimesColumn InchesEmployee Retirement Income Security ActForbesFuture Of NewspapersHelp:CS1 ErrorsWikipedia:Link RotThe Wall Street JournalTemplate:PulitzerPrize Criticism 2001–2025Template Talk:PulitzerPrize Criticism 2001–2025Pulitzer Prize For CriticismGail CaldwellJustin DavidsonStephen HunterJoe MorgensternRobin GivhanJonathan GoldMark FeeneyHolland CotterSarah Kaufman (critic)Sebastian SmeeWesley MorrisPhilip KennicottInga SaffronMary McNamaraEmily NussbaumHilton AlsTemplate:PulitzerPrize CriticismTemplate:PulitzerPrize Criticism 1970–1975Template:PulitzerPrize Criticism 1976–2000Template:PulitzerPrize Criticism 2001–2025Help:CategoryCategory:1960 BirthsCategory:Motoring JournalistsCategory:American ColumnistsCategory:Los Angeles Times PeopleCategory:Pulitzer Prize For Criticism WinnersCategory:East Carolina University AlumniCategory:Living PeopleCategory:People From New Bern, North CarolinaCategory:The Wall Street Journal PeopleCategory:Pages Using Web Citations With No URLCategory:All Articles With Dead External LinksCategory:Articles With Dead External Links From December 2012Category:Articles That May Contain Original Research From April 2013Category:All Articles That May Contain Original ResearchCategory:All Articles With Unsourced StatementsCategory:Articles With Unsourced Statements From June 2016Discussion About Edits From This IP Address [n]A List Of Edits Made From This IP Address [y]View The Content Page [c]Discussion About The Content Page [t]Edit This Page [e]Visit The Main Page [z]Guides To Browsing WikipediaFeatured Content – The Best Of WikipediaFind Background Information On Current EventsLoad A Random Article [x]Guidance On How To Use And Edit WikipediaFind Out About WikipediaAbout The Project, What You Can Do, Where To Find ThingsA List Of Recent Changes In The Wiki [r]List Of All English Wikipedia Pages Containing Links To This Page [j]Recent Changes In Pages Linked From This Page [k]Upload Files [u]A List Of All Special Pages [q]Wikipedia:AboutWikipedia:General Disclaimer



view link view link view link view link view link