Contents 1 History 1.1 Historical markers 2 Geography and climate 3 Economy 3.1 Top employers 4 Demographics 4.1 2010 4.2 2000 5 Neighborhoods 5.1 North Corona 5.2 Downtown/North Main 5.3 Central Corona 5.4 South Corona 5.5 Sierra Del Oro 5.6 Dos Lagos 5.7 Coronita 5.8 Temescal Valley 5.9 Home Gardens 5.10 El Cerrito 5.11 Eagle Glen 6 Government 7 Infrastructure 7.1 Transportation 7.2 Healthcare 7.3 Education 7.4 Utilities 7.5 Cemetery 8 Arts and culture 8.1 Performing arts 9 Notable people 10 Missing time capsules 11 Sister cities 12 See also 13 References 14 External links


History[edit] Corona, originally named South Riverside, was founded at the height of the Southern California citrus boom in 1886, and is advantageously situated at the upper end of the Santa Ana River Canyon, a significant pass through the Santa Ana Mountains. The town of Corona was once the "Lemon Capital of the World". A museum there presents the lemon's former role in the local economy. The city derived its name (and its nickname, "The Circle City") from the curious layout of its streets, with a standard grid enclosed by the circular Grand Boulevard, 2.75 miles (4.43 kilometers) in circumference.[9] The street layout was designed by Hiram Clay Kellogg, a civil engineer from Anaheim who was an influential figure in the early development of Orange County. Corona was established as a town by the South Riverside Land and Water Company. The company was incorporated in 1886; founding members included ex-Governor of Iowa Samuel Merrill, R.B. Taylor, George L. Joy, A.S. Garretson, and Adolph Rimpau.[10] Originally a citrus growers' organization, it purchased the lands of Rancho La Sierra of Bernardo Yorba, and the Rancho Temescal grant and the colony of South Riverside was laid out. They also secured the water rights to Temescal Creek, its tributaries and Lee Lake. Dams and pipelines were built to carry the water to the colony. In 1889, the Temescal Water Company was incorporated, to supply water for the new colony. This company purchased all the water-bearing lands in the Temescal valley and began drilling artesian wells.[11] Originally located in San Bernardino County, the city was named "South Riverside" and received its post office in that name on August 11, 1887.[12] In 1893, South Riverside became part of the new Riverside County. In 1896, the city was renamed "Corona" for its circular Grand Boulevard, where three international automobile races were held in 1913, 1914 and 1916.[13] The city of Corona has been popular among celebrities drawn to its upscale areas and relative privacy compared to Los Angeles. Desi Arnaz spent time at their ranch, located in north Corona, and played golf often at Cresta Verde Golf Course in the northeastern section of the city.[14] After their divorce, Mr. Arnaz continued to live in Corona. In recent years Corona has been known as the "Gateway to the Inland Empire". Prior to the 1980s, the city was largely an agricultural community, dominated by citrus orchards, ranches, and dairy farms. High real estate prices in Los Angeles and Orange counties made the area's land desirable to developers and industrialists, and by the late 1990s Corona was considered a major suburb of Los Angeles.[citation needed] Corona has become a bedroom community for Orange County, Los Angeles, and the larger cities of the Inland Empire. The development of commerce and industry in the city has been accelerated by access to the area via the 91 Freeway, with many firms leaving northern Orange County to be closer to their employees' homes in Corona and Riverside. The construction of the nearby 71 Freeway has linked Corona to the Pomona and San Gabriel valleys. Due to traffic caused by Corona's considerable growth, toll roads have been built along the 91 Freeway, with future toll road expansions planned along Interstate 15. In 2002, the city government considered an initiative to secede from Riverside County and form an autonomous Corona County because the city government and some residents were dissatisfied with how services were handled in nearby areas. The effort was also considered by areas in other cities in the western part of the county as far south as Murrieta. Whether nearby cities such as Norco would have been included in the new county are unknown. The proposed county would have been bordered by San Bernardino County to the northwest, and by Orange County to the west, but it never came to fruition.[15] Historical markers[edit] Roadside Historical Markers in Corona[16] Name Date placed Description Location Placed by Butterfield Stage Station 1934 First used 1858 20730 Temescal Canyon Road Corona Woman's Improvement Club Corona Founders 1936 Land purchase of May 4, 1886 Corona City Park 20-30 Club of Corona Old Temescal Road 1959 Route of Luiseno and Gabrieleno Indians, and early white settlers 11 mi (18 km) south on old Highway 71 Corona Woman's Improvement Club and State Park Commission Painted Rock May 4, 1927 Indian pictograph Old Temescal Canyon Road Corona Woman's Improvement Club Third Serrano Adobe 1981 Owned by Josefa Serrano, widow of Leandro I-15 and Old Temescal Road E Clampus Vitus, Hydro Conduit Corp., Phil Porretta family Serrano Tanning Vats 1981 Built 1819 I-15 and Old Temescal Road E Clampus Vitus, Hydro Conduit Corp., Phil Porretta family


Geography and climate[edit] Corona is located in the Greater Los Angeles Area. Corona is located at 33°52′N 117°34′W / 33.867°N 117.567°W / 33.867; -117.567 (33.8700, −117.5678).[17] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 38.9 square miles (101 km2), of which, 38.8 square miles (100 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (0.27%) is water. In recent years, there are talks to construct a proposed 10 mi (16 km) automobile and fast-speed train tunnel under Santiago Peak to connect Interstate 15 in Corona with Interstate 5 and the 55 Freeway of Orange County, to cut down on commuter traffic on the already crowded or high-traffic 91 Freeway. Corona experiences a warm Mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification CSa) and has mild winters and hot summers. Most of the rainfall (as in all of Southern California) occurs during winter and early spring. The winter low temperatures can get cold enough for frost, with rare snowfall seen on the local foothills. Winter days are pleasant, with the mercury staying around 65 degrees Fahrenheit (occasionally warming into the 70s). Summertime is hot, with highs averaging in the low 90s. During the hottest months, daytime temperatures in Corona often exceed 100 degrees.[18] Climate data for Corona, California Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Record high °F (°C) 93 (34) 91 (33) 100 (38) 100 (38) 107 (42) 110 (43) 110 (43) 110 (43) 114 (46) 108 (42) 99 (37) 94 (34) 114 (46) Average high °F (°C) 66 (19) 69 (21) 71 (22) 77 (25) 80 (27) 87 (31) 92 (33) 93 (34) 90 (32) 83 (28) 74 (23) 68 (20) 79.2 (26.3) Average low °F (°C) 40 (4) 43 (6) 45 (7) 48 (9) 52 (11) 57 (14) 62 (17) 64 (18) 60 (16) 52 (11) 45 (7) 42 (6) 50.8 (10.5) Record low °F (°C) 23 (−5) 26 (−3) 28 (−2) 30 (−1) 32 (0) 44 (7) 47 (8) 46 (8) 41 (5) 29 (−2) 26 (−3) 22 (−6) 22 (−6) Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.01 (76.5) 3.06 (77.7) 2.31 (58.7) .79 (20.1) .26 (6.6) .04 (1) .04 (1) .12 (3) .24 (6.1) .45 (11.4) 1.07 (27.2) 2.08 (52.8) 13.48 (342.4) Average precipitation days 6.9 7.0 5.5 3.7 1.2 0.3 0.7 1.0 1.2 2.2 4.1 6.2 40.1 Mean monthly sunshine hours 195 215 260 310 305 300 380 365 290 250 210 205 3,285 Source: [19]


Economy[edit] Some businesses headquartered in Corona: Monster Beverage, a worldwide manufacturer of soft drinks, including Hansen's beverages and the Monster Energy drink line.[citation needed] Saleen, manufacturer of specialty, high-performance sports cars.[citation needed] Lucas Oil Products, manufacturer of automotive additive products and owner of naming rights to Lucas Oil Stadium, home venue of the Indianapolis Colts of the NFL.[citation needed] LuLaRoe, a women's clothing multi-level marketing distributor. Top employers[edit] According to the City's 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[20] the top employers in the city are: # Employer # of Employees 1 Corona-Norco Unified School District 4,906 2 Corona Regional Medical Center 1,171 3 Watson Pharmaceuticals (bought by Allergan [now Actavis] in 2012) 1,045 4 City of Corona 894 5 Kaiser Permanente 655 6 Fender (Custom Shop location) 650 7 All American Asphalt 650 8 TWR Framing 400 9 Dart Container 360 10 Core-Mark 308


Demographics[edit] Historical population Census Pop. %± 1900 1,434 — 1910 3,540 146.9% 1920 4,129 16.6% 1930 7,018 70.0% 1940 8,764 24.9% 1950 10,223 16.6% 1960 13,336 30.5% 1970 27,519 106.4% 1980 37,791 37.3% 1990 76,095 101.4% 2000 124,966 64.2% 2010 152,374 21.9% Est. 2016 166,785 [8] 9.5% U.S. Decennial Census[21] 2010[edit] The 2010 United States Census[22] reported that Corona had a population of 152,374. The population density was 3,914.0 people per square mile (1,511.2/km²). The racial makeup of Corona was 90,925 (59.7%) White (40.1% Non-Hispanic White),[23] 8,934 (5.9%) African American, 1,153 (0.8%) Native American, 16,205 (10.6%) Asian, 552 (0.4%) Pacific Islander, 28,003 (18.4%) from other races, and 7,759 (5.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 66,447 persons (41.9%). The Census reported that 151,863 people (99.7% of the population) lived in households, 229 (0.2%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 282 (0.2%) were institutionalized. There were 44,950 households, out of which 22,735 (50.6%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 27,357 (60.9%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 5,971 (13.3%) had a female householder with no husband present, 3,004 (6.7%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 2,690 (6.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 289 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 6,455 households (14.4%) were made up of individuals and 2,224 (4.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.38. There were 36,332 families (80.8% of all households); the average family size was 3.72. The population was spread out with 45,674 people (30.0%) under the age of 18, 15,504 people (10.2%) aged 18 to 24, 44,215 people (29.0%) aged 25 to 44, 35,801 people (23.5%) aged 45 to 64, and 11,180 people (7.3%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32.5 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.5 males. There were 47,174 housing units at an average density of 1,211.8 per square mile (467.9/km²), of which 30,210 (67.2%) were owner-occupied, and 14,740 (32.8%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.3%. 103,170 people (67.7% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 48,693 people (32.0%) lived in rental housing units. During 2009–2013, Corona had a median household income of $77,123, with 10.8% of the population living below the federal poverty line.[23] 2000[edit] As of the census[24] of 2000, there were 124,996 people, 37,839 households, and 30,384 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,555.5 people per square mile (1,372.7/km²). There were 39,271 housing units at an average density of 1,117.3 per square mile (431.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 75.0% White, 6.4% Black or African American, 0.9% Native American, 7.5% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 17.5% from other races, and 5.3% from two or more races. 25.5% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 37,839 households out of which 49.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.8% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.7% were non-families. 14.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.3 and the average family size was 3.6. In the city, the population was spread out with 33.4% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 35.1% from 25 to 44, 16.8% from 45 to 64, and 5.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 98.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males. The median income for a household in the city was $98,615, and the median income for a family was $83,505 (these figures had risen to $88,620 and $95,450 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[25]). Males had a median income of $44,752 versus $31,884 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,001. About 6.0% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.


Neighborhoods[edit] North Corona[edit] Many of the homes in the center of town, such as the ones seen in this early 1900s postcard, were recognized by the National Register of Historic Places in 2011 as part of the Grand Boulevard Circle Historic District.[2] The north part of the city of Corona borders the city of Norco. This area (north of CA 91) is primarily residential and commercial. The makeup is primarily middle and upper-middle income, with most housing being built after the late 1990s, and is known for being well maintained and very safe. This area is home to well rated schools as well as shopping including Costco, Home Depot, and others. Prominent areas include Corona Hills and Corona Ranch. Downtown/North Main[edit] Most of the City's downtown area lies north of the 91 freeway, and is home to the former Fender Museum (now the new Corona Community Center). The area is prominently full of office and apartment buildings, with the newest one (Main Street Metro) under construction. Downtown is also the location of the North Main Corona Metrolink station, which is one of two Metrolink stations in the city. Central Corona[edit] The central city area includes the inner circle of Grand Avenue as well as all areas south of CA 91 and north of Ontario Avenue. This is the oldest area of the city by far, with most housing having been built around 1910. This part of the city has a mixed Hispanic and white population, and consists of many restored historic residences. South Corona[edit] South Corona is the newest Part of corona, and is located south of Ontario Avenue. Most housing stock was built between the early 2000s to the present, and ranges from suburban neighborhoods. This area has the highest rated schools in the city (as well as some of the highest in the region).It is primarily middle class and normal income levels. Sierra Del Oro[edit] Sierra Del Oro is the western portion of Corona, comprising the neighborhoods situated along Green River Rd, extending all the way towards the 91 freeway and the Orange/Riverside county line. This area holds many apartment complexes geared towards commuters. The Corona Auto Center is located at the base of the foothills. In December 2016, construction of the Foothill Parkway expansion was completed, allowing a direct street link between Sierra Del Oro and South Corona. Dos Lagos[edit] Dos Lagos is located near the southern city limits of Corona, straddling Interstate 15. The area is mostly dominated by upscale apartment complexes, newer homes, a shopping center, and a large golf course. Coronita[edit] Coronita, California is an unincorporated, census-designated area in Riverside County enclosed in Western Corona. An annexation attempt in 1986 by the city failed.[26] Temescal Valley[edit] Temescal Valley, California is an unincorporated but census-designated area in Riverside County at the southernmost end of Corona city limits, and is included in the city's sphere of influence. It includes the neighborhoods of Sycamore Creek, Trilogy, The Retreat and Horsethief Canyon Ranch. As of 2013, the City of Corona has applied for annexation of the area through the Riverside County Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO).[27] On September 26, 2013, the Commission formally denied the City of Corona's request for annexation.[28] The contract between Corona and the County to provide its emergency services to the northern-third of Temescal Valley persists.[29] Although the arguments of the opponents of annexation included the fear of being "Coronians" and losing the area's identity, Temescal Valley's ZIP Code remains associated with Corona, CA.[30] Home Gardens[edit] Home Gardens is a Census Designated place within the City of Corona's sphere of influence. The neighborhood is largely populated by Hispanic and Caucasian communities. Home Gardens is one of Corona's largest neighborhoods with a population estimate of approximately 12,000 residents. It is also one of the city's lowest income areas. The neighborhood is served by Magnolia Avenue, a major thoroughfare which leads into the City of Riverside. Bus service is served by the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Corona Cruiser. El Cerrito[edit] El Cerrito is located on the southeastern part of the city, just a few exits away on the I-15 N of the Dos Lagos Neighborhood. El Cerrito is mostly a rural/suburban area with many dirt roads in alleyways and no ranches. El Cerrito is home to El Cerrito Sports Park, a large park consisting of one baseball field and a popular destination for Little League Baseball and local school softball teams. El Cerrito is served by Ontario Ave./Temescal Canyon Rd. Eagle Glen[edit] Eagle Glen is a predominantly upper-middle-class neighborhood. It is located between South Corona and El Cerrito, and is the neighborhood around Wilson Elementary and Eagle Glen Park. This neighborhood is known for being very clean and well maintained, with very good schools.[citation needed]It is close to Wilson Elementary, El Cerrito Middle School, and Santiago High School, all of which are California distinguished schools. Many of the homes are valued anywhere from $400,000 to $650,000. Eagle Glen is also home to a golf course.


Government[edit] In the California State Legislature, Corona is in the 31st Senate District, represented by Democrat Richard Roth, and in the 60th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Sabrina Cervantes.[31] In the United States House of Representatives, Corona is in California's 42nd congressional district, represented by Republican Ken Calvert.[32]


Infrastructure[edit] This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Transportation[edit] Riverside (SR 91) freeway interchange with Chino Valley (SR 71) in western Corona. The city is served by the Chino Valley (SR 71), Ontario (I-15), and Riverside (SR 91) freeways. The city is also linked with the 91 Line and Inland Empire–Orange County Line of the Metrolink commuter rail system, providing service to Los Angeles, Perris, San Bernardino, and Oceanside from North Main Corona Metrolink Station in the Downtown area and West Corona Metrolink Station in Corona's West Side. The city's downtown area is circled by Grand Boulevard, which is very unusual for being perfectly circular. The street is approximately 1 mi (2 km) in diameter. Corona's Public Transportation includes the following bus lines; RTA route 1 from West Corona to UC Riverside, RTA route 3 from Corona Regional Medical center to Swan Lake, RTA route 214 from Downtown Corona to The Village shopping center in Orange, CA, RTA route 206 from Downtown Corona to Temecula, CA, OCTA bus route from Anaheim to south Corona Walmart, Corona Criuser blue and red lines. There's a proposal to erect a new four-lane freeway along/near Cajalco Road/Ramona Expressway to connect Interstate 15 with that of I-215. In addition, there is a possibly of constructing a 7.5 mi (12.1 km) tunnel under the Santiago Peak Mountains to the Eastern Transportation Corridor of the FastTrak toll-road company system in Orange in Orange County, due to increased freeway commute traffic on State Route 91, needs to be reduced by another freeway from the OC to Riverside. Corona Municipal Airport (FAA designator: AJO) serves the city and has a 3,200-foot (980 m) runway. On January 20, 2008, two small passenger aircraft collided over Corona, killing all four men aboard the planes and another man on the ground. In the past ten years, there have been five fatal plane crashes around Corona. Healthcare[edit] Corona is served by the following three hospitals. The Corona Regional Medical Center is a General Acute Care Hospital with Basic Emergency Services as of 2005.[33] Kaiser Permanente Corona (no emergency services). Corona Regional Rehabilitation Hospital. Education[edit] The city of Corona is a part of the Corona-Norco Unified School District.[34] There are five high schools in Corona: Corona, Centennial, Lee V. Pollard (formerly Buena Vista), Orange Grove, Santiago. There are five middle schools in Corona: Auburndale, Citrus Hills, Corona Fundamental, El Cerrito, Raney. There are also 28 elementary schools in the city: John Adams, Susan B. Anthony, Cesar Chavez, Corona Ranch, Coronita, Dwight Eisenhower, Foothill, Ben Franklin, Garretson, Home Gardens, Jefferson, Lincoln Alternative, William McKinley, Orange, Parkridge, Prado View, Promenade, Riverview, Ronald Reagan, Sierra Vista, Stallings, Temescal Valley, Dr. Bernice Todd, Vandermolen, Vicentia, Victress Bower, George Washington and Woodrow Wilson. Private schools include St. Edwards Catholic School and Crossroads Christian School. Utilities[edit] Southern California Edison services most of the electricity and a small part of the city is serviced by Corona Department of Water and Power. Waste Management Inc. provides waste disposal for the city. Cemetery[edit] The Corona Sunnyslope Cemetery[35][36] is a for-profit cemetery established in 1892.[37] Notable burials include USC Trojans athletic director Jess Hill.


Arts and culture[edit] Performing arts[edit] The Arts Alive Council is a non-profit organization created with the purpose to "foster, promote, and increase the public knowledge and appreciation of the arts and cultural activities in the greater Corona Area." Members include the Corona Symphony Orchestra, Circle City Chorale, Christian Arts and Theater, and Corona Dance Academy.[38]


Notable people[edit] Travis Barker – drummer for Blink-182, Boxcar Racer, The Transplants, and +44 Vontaze Burfict – football linebacker for Cincinnati Bengals Richard Dornbush - figure skater [39] Heath Farwell – football linebacker Cirilo Flores - Roman Catholic bishop Troy Glaus – former baseball player Los Angeles Angels Of Anaheim Larissa Hodge – (Bootz) reality television participant, (Flavor of Love 2), (Flavor of Love Girls: Charm School) Tyler Hoechlin – actor, baseball player Candy Johnson – dancer and singer in 1960s AIP "beach" movies Matt Kalil – football offensive lineman for Carolina Panthers Ryan Kalil – football offensive lineman for Carolina Panthers Joe Kelly – Major League Baseball starting pitcher Kerry King – guitarist for Slayer[40] Denny Lemaster - MLB pitcher Crystal Lewis – Christian music singer, TV actress[41] Taylor Martinez – former quarterback for Nebraska Cornhuskers Taryne Mowatt – All-American softball pitcher for Arizona Wildcats and two-time ESPY Award winner Ricky Nolasco – Major League Baseball pitcher for Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Michael Parks - actor, Kill Bill, Red State, The Happening and other films Lonie Paxton – former NFL player for New England Patriots and Denver Broncos Jenni Rivera – vocalist, songwriter of banda music Chance Sisco - baseball player for Baltimore Orioles D.J. Strawberry – professional basketball player Jodie Sweetin – actress known for her role as Stephanie Tanner on television sitcom Full House[42] Gary Webb – investigative journalist


Missing time capsules[edit] Corona has been referred to as the 'record holder in the fumbled time capsule category' with 17 time capsules buried – and lost.[43]


Sister cities[edit] The following are Corona's sister cities as designated by Sister Cities International.[44] Fuxin, China Gōtsu, Japan Ocotlán, Mexico Silkeborg, Denmark


See also[edit] Inland Empire portal Freeway Complex Fire – a 2008 wildfire that started at the Yorba Linda/Corona city limit line. Rancho Temescal (Serrano)


References[edit] ^ a b c "City Council". City of Corona. Retrieved April 14, 2017.  ^ a b PE.com: Corona: Circle citys circle makes national register ^ Corona, California: The city that doubled as a race course. Hemmings Daily. Retrieved 2013-11-05. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date". California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Archived from the original (Word) on November 3, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.  ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 19, 2017.  ^ "Corona". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 23, 2014.  ^ "Corona (city) QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 12, 2015.  ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.  ^ "Corona: 'Circle City' to mark centennial of road races". The Press-Enterprise. August 16, 2013. ...Grand Boulevard seems a quaint oddity. A perfect circle, with a circumference just over 2.75 miles, it's the rationale for Corona's tagline as the 'Circle City'.  ^ Finding aid of South Riverside Land and Water Company records, Online Archive of California from oac.cdlib.org accessed April 26, 2015. ^ Ellerbe, History of Temescal Valley, pp. 18–19 ^ Frickstad, Walter N., A Century of California Post Offices 1848-1954, Philatelic Research Society, Oakland, CA. 1955, pp.135-147 ^ Hoover, Mildred B.; Hero Rensch; Ethel Rensch; William N. Abeloe (1966). Historic Spots in California. Stanford University Press. ISBN 978-0-8047-4482-9.  ^ http://www.crestaverde.com ^ Santa Barbara News Press article on the county split proposal, with a brief mention of the proposed Corona County. ^ Johnson, Marael (1995). Why Stop? A Guide to California Roadside Historical Markers. Houston, TX: Gulf Publishing Company. pp. 38–39. ISBN 978-0884159230. OCLC 32168093.  ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.  ^ www.weather.com ^ "Corona weather averages". Weather. Retrieved May 29, 2011.  ^ City of Corona CAFR ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.  ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Corona city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014.  ^ a b http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0616350.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help) ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  ^ Corona 2007 Income Estimates ^ http://articles.latimes.com/1986-07-15/local/me-21096_1_annexation ^ http://www.pe.com/local-news/politics/jeff-horseman-headlines/20130730-temescal-valley-county-supervisors-oppose-coronas-annexation-plan.ece ^ http://www.pe.com/local-news/riverside-county/corona/corona-headlines-index/20130926-corona-temescal-valley-annexation-denied.ece ^ http://www.pe.com/local-news/riverside-county/corona/corona-headlines-index/20130920-temescal-valley-commission-staff-dont-support-coronas-annexation-bid.ece ^ https://tools.usps.com/go/ZipLookupResultsAction!input.action?resultMode=2&companyName=&address1=&address2=&city=&state=Select&urbanCode=&postalCode=92883&zip= ^ "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Retrieved November 30, 2014.  ^ "California's 42nd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC.  ^ California Department of Health Services Archived December 29, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. ^ "Corona-Norco Unified School District". 2009. Retrieved October 23, 2009  ^ 33°52′09″N 117°32′47″W / 33.8691826°N 117.5464378°W / 33.8691826; -117.5464378 USGS Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) ^ Corona Sunnyslope Cemetery Find A Grave ^ Corona Sunnyslope Cemetery ^ http://www.artsalivecouncil.org/mission-statement/ ^ "International Skating Union Bio: Richard Dornbush". Retrieved 2014-04-02.  ^ "After Jeff Hanneman's Death, "We Had to Learn How to Be Slayer in a New Way"". LA Weekly. 2015-06-14. Retrieved 2017-03-18.  ^ "Autobiography: Crystal Lewis Official Website". www.crystallewis.com. Retrieved 2010-06-14.  ^ Dyball, Rennie. "Full House's Jodie Sweetin "I Can't Believe How Far I've Come" – Babies, Personal Success, Substance Abuse, Jodie Sweetin : People.com". www.people.com. Retrieved 2010-06-14.  ^ "Most Wanted Time Capsules". The Crypt of Civilization. Oglethorpe University. Archived from the original on June 2, 2010. Retrieved March 1, 2011.  ^ http://www.sister-cities.org/interactive-map/Corona,%20California


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Official website InnerCircleCorona – a community communications system partially sponsored by the City of Corona Corona, California at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Corona-Norco School District v t e Municipalities and communities of Riverside County, California, United States County seat: Riverside Cities Banning Beaumont Blythe Calimesa Canyon Lake Cathedral City Coachella Corona Desert Hot Springs Eastvale Hemet Indian Wells Indio Jurupa Valley La Quinta Lake Elsinore Menifee Moreno Valley Murrieta Norco Palm Desert Palm Springs Perris Rancho Mirage Riverside San Jacinto Temecula Wildomar CDPs Aguanga Anza Bermuda Dunes Cabazon Cherry Valley Coronita Crestmore Heights Desert Center Desert Edge Desert Palms East Hemet El Cerrito El Sobrante French Valley Garnet Glen Avon Good Hope Green Acres Highgrove Home Gardens Homeland Idyllwild-Pine Cove Indio Hills Lake Mathews Lake Riverside Lakeland Village Lakeview March ARB Mead Valley Meadowbrook Mecca Mesa Verde Mira Loma Mountain Center North 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Saahatpa Temescal Terra Cotta Willard Willow Springs Station v t e Inland Empire Counties Riverside San Bernardino Major cities Riverside San Bernardino Cities and towns 100k+ Corona Fontana Moreno Valley Murrieta Ontario Rancho Cucamonga Temecula Victorville Cities and towns 25k–100k Apple Valley Banning Beaumont Cathedral City Chino Chino Hills Coachella Colton Desert Hot Springs Eastvale Hemet Hesperia Highland Indio Jurupa Valley Lake Elsinore Menifee Montclair Norco Palm Desert Palm Springs Perris Redlands Rialto Rubidoux San Jacinto Twentynine Palms Upland Valle Vista Wildomar Yucaipa Cities and towns 10k–25k Adelanto Barstow Big Bear City Bloomington Blythe Cabazon Canyon Lake Crestline Glen Avon Grand Terrace La Quinta Loma Linda Mira Loma Pedley Rancho Mirage Twentynine Palms Yucca Valley Cities and towns under 10k Big Bear Lake Calimesa Devore El Cerrito Oak Glen Highgrove Home Gardens Indian Wells Joshua Tree Lake Arrowhead Landers Mentone Muscoy Needles Romoland San Antonio Heights Sunnyslope Wrightwood Woodcrest Regions Coachella Valley Cucamonga Valley Elsinore Trough High Desert Morongo Basin Perris Plain Plains of Leon San Bernardino Mountains San Bernardino Valley San Jacinto Mountains San Jacinto Valley Santa Ana Mountains Temescal Mountains Victor Valley v t e Greater Los Angeles Area Central city Los Angeles Counties Los Angeles Orange Riverside San Bernardino Ventura Satellite cities Long Beach Riverside San Bernardino Cities >200k Anaheim Fontana Glendale Huntington Beach Irvine Long Beach Moreno Valley Oxnard Riverside San Bernardino Santa Ana Cities and towns 100k−200k Burbank Corona Costa Mesa Downey East Los Angeles El Monte Fullerton Garden Grove Inglewood Lancaster Murrieta Norwalk Ontario Orange Palmdale Pasadena Pomona Rancho Cucamonga Rialto Santa Clarita Simi Valley Temecula Thousand Oaks Torrance Ventura Victorville West Covina Area regions Los Angeles metropolitan area Antelope Valley Central Los Angeles Coachella Valley Colorado Desert Conejo Valley Downtown Los Angeles East Los Angeles Gateway Cities Greater Hollywood Harbor Area Inland Empire Mojave Desert Northwest Los Angeles Palos Verdes Peninsula Pomona Valley San Bernardino Valley San Fernando Valley San Gabriel Valley Santa Ana Valley Santa Clarita Valley Simi Valley South Bay South Los Angeles Victor Valley Westside Los Angeles Landforms Los Angeles Basin Baldwin Hills (range) Catalina Island Channel Islands Chino Hills Hollywood Hills Oxnard Plain Palos Verdes Hills Puente Hills San Fernando Valley San Gabriel Mountains San Gabriel Valley San Jacinto Mountains Santa Ana Mountains Santa Monica Mountains Santa Susana Mountains Sierra Pelona Mountains Simi Hills Verdugo Mountains Bodies of water Los Angeles River Aliso Creek Arroyo Calabasas Arroyo Seco Ballona Creek Bell Creek Big Bear Lake Coyote Creek Lake Arrowhead Lake Gregory Lake Perris Lake Piru Los Angeles Aqueduct Malibu Creek Mojave River Pacific Ocean Pyramid Lake Rio Hondo San Gabriel River San Juan Creek San Pedro Bay Santa Ana River Santa Clara River Santa Margarita River Santa Monica Bay Tujunga Wash v t e Mayors of cities with populations exceeding 100,000 in California Eric Garcetti (Los Angeles) Kevin Faulconer (San Diego) Sam Liccardo (San Jose) London Breed (acting) (San Francisco) Lee Brand (Fresno) Darrell Steinberg (Sacramento) Robert Garcia (Long Beach) Libby Schaaf (Oakland) Karen Goh (Bakersfield) Tom Tait (Anaheim) Miguel A. Pulido (Santa Ana) Rusty Bailey (Riverside) Anthony Silva (Stockton) Mary Salas (Chula Vista) Don Wagner (Irvine) Lily Mei (Fremont) R. Carey Davis (San Bernardino) Garrad Marsh (Modesto) Acquanetta Warren (Fontana) Tim Flynn (Oxnard) Jesse Molina (Moreno Valley)* Mike Posey (Huntington Beach)* Paula Devine (Glendale)* Marsha McLean (Santa Clarita)* Jim Wood (Oceanside) Bao Nguyen (Garden Grove) L. Dennis Michael (Rancho Cucamonga) John Sawyer (Santa Rosa)* Paul S. Leon (Ontario) Gary Davis (Elk Grove) Eugene Montanez (Corona)* R. Rex Parris (Lancaster) James C. Ledford Jr. (Palmdale) Barbara Halliday (Hayward) Joe Gunter (Salinas) Elliot Rothman (Pomona) Jim Griffith (Sunnyvale) Sam Abed (Escondido) Patrick J. Furey (Torrance) Terry Tornek (Pasadena) Teresa Smith (Orange) Greg Sebourn (Fullerton)* Carol Garcia (Roseville) Steve Nelsen (Visalia) Al Adam (Thousand Oaks)* Tim Grayson (Concord)* Bob Huber (Simi Valley) Jamie L. Matthews (Santa Clara) Gloria Garcia (Victorville) Bob Sampayan (Vallejo) Jesse Arreguín (Berkeley) Andre Quintero (El Monte) Luis H. Marquez (Downey)* Matt Hall (Carlsbad) Stephen Mensinger (Costa Mesa)* Harry T. Price (Fairfield) Jeff Comerchero (Temecula) James T. Butts Jr. (Inglewood) Wade Harper (Antioch) Harry Ramos (Murrieta) Cheryl Heitmann (Ventura)* Tom Butt (Richmond) Fredrick Sykes (West Covina)* Luigi Vernola (Norwalk)* Raymond A. Buenaventura (Daly City) Bob Frutos (Burbank)* Alice Patino (Santa Maria) Nathan Magsig (Clovis)* Bill Wells (El Cajon) Maureen Freschet (San Mateo)* Judy Ritter (Vista) Brad Hancock (Jurupa Valley) ^* Mayor selected from city council Other states AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Corona,_California&oldid=820829971" Categories: Corona, California1896 establishments in CaliforniaCities in Riverside County, CaliforniaElsinore TroughIncorporated cities and towns in CaliforniaPopulated places established in 1886Populated places established in 1896Populated places on the Santa Ana RiverHidden categories: Pages with citations lacking titlesPages with citations having bare URLsWebarchive template wayback linksArticles with inconsistent citation formatsUse mdy dates from December 2014Coordinates on WikidataAll articles with unsourced statementsArticles with unsourced statements from October 2009Articles with unsourced statements from April 2015Articles with unsourced statements from February 2016Articles needing additional references from April 2012All articles needing additional referencesArticles with DMOZ links


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General Law CityA View Of CoronaOfficial Seal Of Corona, CaliforniaLocation Of Corona In Riverside County, California.Corona Is Located In CaliforniaCorona Is Located In The USGeographic Coordinate SystemList Of Sovereign StatesUnited StatesU.S. StateCaliforniaList Of Counties In CaliforniaRiverside County, CaliforniaMunicipal CorporationCouncil-manager GovernmentMayorGeneral Law CityGeneral Law CityRiverside County, CaliforniaList Of Largest California Cities By PopulationList Of United States Cities By PopulationMetropolitan AreaTime ZonePacific Time ZoneUTC-8Daylight Saving TimePacific Daylight TimeUTC-7ZIP CodeNorth American Numbering PlanArea Code 951Federal Information Processing StandardGeographic Names Information SystemRiverside County, CaliforniaCaliforniaUnited States2010 United States Census2000 United States CensusNorco, CaliforniaRiverside, CaliforniaEastvale, CaliforniaChino Hills, CaliforniaYorba Linda, CaliforniaCleveland National ForestSanta Ana MountainsCitrusSanta Ana RiverSanta Ana MountainsAnaheim, CaliforniaSamuel Merrill (Iowa)Rancho La Sierra (Yorba)Rancho Temescal (Serrano)Temescal Creek (Riverside County)San Bernardino County, CaliforniaDesi ArnazInland Empire (California)DairyLos Angeles County, CaliforniaOrange County, CaliforniaSuburbLos AngelesWikipedia:Citation NeededBedroom CommunityCalifornia State Route 91California State Route 71Pomona ValleySan Gabriel Valley91 Express LanesInterstate 15Murrieta, CaliforniaNorco, CaliforniaSan Bernardino County, CaliforniaOrange County, CaliforniaButterfield Overland MailUnited States Census BureauInterstate 5California State Route 55Mediterranean ClimateKöppen Climate ClassificationPrecipitationSunshine DurationMonster BeverageMonster EnergyWikipedia:Citation NeededSaleenWikipedia:Citation NeededLucas OilLucas Oil StadiumIndianapolis ColtsNFLWikipedia:Citation NeededLuLaRoeMulti-level MarketingCorona-Norco Unified School DistrictUniversal Health ServicesActavisKaiser PermanenteFender Musical 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PlacesNorco, CaliforniaCalifornia State Route 91California State Route 91Coronita, CaliforniaTemescal Valley, CaliforniaHome Gardens, CaliforniaEl Cerrito, Riverside County, CaliforniaWikipedia:Citation NeededCalifornia State LegislatureCalifornia's 31st State Senate DistrictCalifornia Democratic PartyRichard Roth (politician)California's 60th State Assembly DistrictCalifornia Democratic PartySabrina CervantesUnited States House Of RepresentativesCalifornia's 42nd Congressional DistrictRepublican Party (United States)Ken CalvertWikipedia:VerifiabilityHelp:Introduction To Referencing With Wiki Markup/1Help:Maintenance Template RemovalEnlargeCalifornia State Route 71Ontario FreewayCalifornia State Route 91Metrolink 91 LineInland Empire–Orange County LineMetrolink (Southern California)Los AngelesPerris, CaliforniaSan BernardinoOceanside, CaliforniaNorth Main Corona Metrolink StationWest Corona Metrolink StationGrand Boulevard (Corona)Orange, CaliforniaCorona Municipal AirportHospitalCorona-Norco Unified School DistrictCorona High SchoolCentennial High School (Corona, California)Santiago High School (Corona, California)Crossroads Christian SchoolSouthern California EdisonUSC TrojansJess HillTravis BarkerBlink-182Boxcar RacerThe Transplants+44 (band)Vontaze BurfictAmerican FootballLinebackerCincinnati BengalsRichard DornbushHeath FarwellCirilo FloresTroy GlausLos Angeles Angels Of AnaheimLarissa HodgeFlavor Of Love 2Flavor Of Love Girls: Charm SchoolTyler HoechlinCandy JohnsonAmerican International PicturesMatt KalilOffensive LinemanCarolina PanthersRyan KalilCarolina PanthersJoe Kelly (pitcher)Major League BaseballStarting PitcherKerry KingSlayerDenny LemasterCrystal LewisChristian MusicTaylor MartinezQuarterbackNebraska CornhuskersTaryne MowattArizona WildcatsESPY AwardRicky NolascoMajor League BaseballPitcherLos Angeles Angels Of AnaheimMichael ParksKill BillRed State (2011 Film)The Happening (1967 Film)Lonie PaxtonNational Football LeagueNew England PatriotsDenver BroncosJenni RiveraSingingSongwriterBanda MusicChance SiscoBaltimore OriolesD.J. StrawberryBasketballJodie SweetinStephanie TannerFull HouseGary WebbTwin Towns And Sister CitiesSister Cities InternationalChinaFuxinChinaJapanGōtsu, ShimaneJapanMexicoOcotlán, JaliscoMexicoDenmarkSilkeborgDenmarkPortal:Inland EmpireFreeway Complex FireYorba Linda, CaliforniaRancho Temescal (Serrano)Local Agency Formation CommissionGeographic Names Information SystemUnited States Geological SurveyUnited States Census BureauThe Press-EnterpriseInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/978-0-8047-4482-9International Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/978-0884159230OCLCUnited States Census BureauHelp:CS1 ErrorsUnited States Census BureauWayback MachineFind A GraveLA WeeklyDMOZTemplate:Riverside County, CaliforniaTemplate Talk:Riverside County, CaliforniaRiverside County, CaliforniaCounty SeatRiverside, CaliforniaList Of Municipalities In CaliforniaBanning, CaliforniaBeaumont, CaliforniaBlythe, CaliforniaCalimesa, CaliforniaCanyon Lake, CaliforniaCathedral City, CaliforniaCoachella, CaliforniaDesert Hot Springs, CaliforniaEastvale, CaliforniaHemet, CaliforniaIndian Wells, CaliforniaIndio, CaliforniaJurupa Valley, CaliforniaLa Quinta, CaliforniaLake Elsinore, CaliforniaMenifee, CaliforniaMoreno Valley, CaliforniaMurrieta, CaliforniaNorco, CaliforniaPalm Desert, CaliforniaPalm Springs, CaliforniaPerris, CaliforniaRancho Mirage, CaliforniaRiverside, CaliforniaSan Jacinto, CaliforniaTemecula, CaliforniaWildomar, CaliforniaCensus-designated PlaceAguanga, CaliforniaAnza, CaliforniaBermuda Dunes, CaliforniaCabazon, CaliforniaCherry Valley, CaliforniaCoronita, CaliforniaCrestmore Heights, CaliforniaDesert Center, CaliforniaDesert Edge, CaliforniaDesert Palms, CaliforniaEast Hemet, CaliforniaEl Cerrito, Riverside County, CaliforniaEl Sobrante, Riverside County, CaliforniaFrench Valley, CaliforniaGarnet, CaliforniaGlen Avon, CaliforniaGood Hope, CaliforniaGreen Acres, CaliforniaHighgrove, CaliforniaHome Gardens, CaliforniaHomeland, CaliforniaIdyllwild-Pine Cove, CaliforniaIndio Hills, CaliforniaLake Mathews, CaliforniaLake Riverside, CaliforniaLakeland Village, CaliforniaLakeview, CaliforniaMarch Joint Air Reserve BaseMead Valley, CaliforniaMeadowbrook, CaliforniaMecca, CaliforniaMesa Verde, CaliforniaMira Loma, CaliforniaMountain Center, CaliforniaNorth Shore, CaliforniaNuevo, CaliforniaOasis, Riverside County, CaliforniaPedley, CaliforniaRipley, CaliforniaRomoland, CaliforniaRubidoux, CaliforniaSky Valley, CaliforniaSunnyslope, CaliforniaTemescal Valley, CaliforniaThermal, CaliforniaThousand Palms, CaliforniaValle Vista, CaliforniaVista Santa Rosa, CaliforniaWarm Springs, CaliforniaWhitewater, CaliforniaWinchester, CaliforniaWoodcrest, CaliforniaUnincorporated AreaAlberhill, CaliforniaAlessandro, CaliforniaArcilla, CaliforniaArnold Heights, CaliforniaB Bar H Ranch, CaliforniaBelltown, CaliforniaBiskra Palms, CaliforniaBly, CaliforniaBonnie Bell, CaliforniaBox Springs, CaliforniaCactus City, CaliforniaCahuilla, CaliforniaCahuilla Hills, CaliforniaChiriaco Summit, CaliforniaDesert Beach, CaliforniaEast Blythe, CaliforniaEdgemont, Riverside County, CaliforniaEl Cariso, CaliforniaGilman Hot Springs, CaliforniaLa Cresta, Riverside County, CaliforniaLost Lake Resort, CaliforniaMortmar, CaliforniaNorth Palm Springs, CaliforniaPinyon Pines, CaliforniaRadec, CaliforniaRancho CapistranoRiver Bend Lodge, CaliforniaSage, Riverside County, CaliforniaSnow Creek VillageSun City Palm Desert, CaliforniaValerie, CaliforniaIndian ReservationAgua Caliente Band Of Cahuilla IndiansAugustine Band Of Cahuilla IndiansCabazon Band Of Mission IndiansCahuilla Band Of Mission Indians Of The Cahuilla ReservationColorado River Indian TribesLos Coyotes Band Of Cahuilla And Cupeno IndiansMorongo Band Of Mission IndiansPechanga Band Of Luiseno Mission IndiansRamona Band Of CahuillaSanta Rosa Band Of Cahuilla IndiansSoboba Band Of Luiseno IndiansTorres-Martinez Desert Cahuilla IndiansTwenty-Nine Palms Band Of Mission Indians Of CaliforniaGhost TownAlamo Bonito, CaliforniaAuld, CaliforniaBergman, CaliforniaBradshaw's FerryCaleb, CaliforniaDos Palmas SpringEagle Mountain, CaliforniaHell, CaliforniaLa Placita, CaliforniaLeon, CaliforniaLinda Rosa, CaliforniaMidland, CaliforniaOlive City, ArizonaPinacate, CaliforniaSaahatpa, CaliforniaRancho Temescal (Serrano)Terra Cotta, CaliforniaWillard, CaliforniaWillow Springs StationTemplate:Inland EmpireTemplate Talk:Inland EmpireInland EmpireRiverside County, CaliforniaSan Bernardino County, CaliforniaRiverside, CaliforniaSan Bernardino, CaliforniaFontana, CaliforniaMoreno Valley, CaliforniaMurrieta, CaliforniaOntario, CaliforniaRancho Cucamonga, CaliforniaTemecula, CaliforniaVictorville, CaliforniaApple Valley, CaliforniaBanning, CaliforniaBeaumont, CaliforniaCathedral City, CaliforniaChino, CaliforniaChino Hills, CaliforniaCoachella, CaliforniaColton, CaliforniaDesert Hot Springs, CaliforniaEastvale, CaliforniaHemet, CaliforniaHesperia, CaliforniaHighland, CaliforniaIndio, CaliforniaJurupa Valley, CaliforniaLake Elsinore, CaliforniaMenifee, CaliforniaMontclair, CaliforniaNorco, CaliforniaPalm Desert, CaliforniaPalm Springs, CaliforniaPerris, CaliforniaRedlands, CaliforniaRialto, CaliforniaRubidoux, CaliforniaSan Jacinto, CaliforniaTwentynine Palms, CaliforniaUpland, CaliforniaValle Vista, CaliforniaWildomar, CaliforniaYucaipa, CaliforniaAdelanto, CaliforniaBarstow, CaliforniaBig Bear City, CaliforniaBloomington, CaliforniaBlythe, CaliforniaCabazon, CaliforniaCanyon Lake, CaliforniaCrestline, CaliforniaGlen Avon, CaliforniaGrand Terrace, CaliforniaLa Quinta, CaliforniaLoma Linda, CaliforniaMira Loma, CaliforniaPedley, CaliforniaRancho Mirage, CaliforniaTwentynine Palms, CaliforniaYucca Valley, CaliforniaBig Bear Lake, CaliforniaCalimesa, CaliforniaDevore, CaliforniaEl Cerrito, Riverside County, CaliforniaOak Glen, San Bernardino County, CaliforniaHighgrove, CaliforniaHome Gardens, CaliforniaIndian Wells, CaliforniaJoshua Tree, CaliforniaLake Arrowhead, CaliforniaLanders, CaliforniaMentone, CaliforniaMuscoy, CaliforniaNeedles, CaliforniaRomoland, CaliforniaSan Antonio Heights, CaliforniaSunnyslope, CaliforniaWrightwood, CaliforniaWoodcrest, CaliforniaCoachella ValleyCucamonga ValleyElsinore TroughHigh Desert (California)Morongo BasinPerris BlockPlains Of LeonSan Bernardino MountainsSan Bernardino ValleySan Jacinto MountainsSan Jacinto ValleySanta Ana MountainsTemescal MountainsVictor ValleyTemplate:Greater Los Angeles AreaTemplate Talk:Greater Los Angeles AreaGreater Los Angeles AreaLos AngelesLos Angeles County, CaliforniaOrange County, CaliforniaRiverside County, CaliforniaSan Bernardino County, CaliforniaVentura County, CaliforniaSatellite TownLong Beach, CaliforniaRiverside, CaliforniaSan Bernardino, CaliforniaAnaheim, CaliforniaFontana, CaliforniaGlendale, CaliforniaHuntington Beach, CaliforniaIrvine, CaliforniaLong Beach, CaliforniaMoreno Valley, CaliforniaOxnard, CaliforniaRiverside, CaliforniaSan Bernardino, CaliforniaSanta Ana, CaliforniaBurbank, CaliforniaCosta Mesa, CaliforniaDowney, CaliforniaEast Los Angeles, CaliforniaEl Monte, CaliforniaFullerton, CaliforniaGarden Grove, CaliforniaInglewood, CaliforniaLancaster, CaliforniaMurrieta, CaliforniaNorwalk, CaliforniaOntario, CaliforniaOrange, CaliforniaPalmdale, CaliforniaPasadena, CaliforniaPomona, CaliforniaRancho Cucamonga, CaliforniaRialto, CaliforniaSanta Clarita, CaliforniaSimi Valley, CaliforniaTemecula, CaliforniaThousand Oaks, CaliforniaTorrance, CaliforniaVentura, CaliforniaVictorville, CaliforniaWest Covina, CaliforniaLos Angeles Metropolitan AreaAntelope ValleyCentral Los AngelesCoachella ValleyColorado DesertConejo ValleyDowntown Los AngelesEast Los Angeles (region)Gateway CitiesGreater Hollywood, Los AngelesHarbor AreaInland EmpireMojave DesertNorthwest Los AngelesPalos Verdes PeninsulaPomona ValleySan Bernardino ValleySan Fernando ValleySan Gabriel ValleySanta Ana ValleySanta Clarita ValleySimi Valley, CaliforniaSouth Bay, Los AngelesSouth Los AngelesVictor ValleyWestside (Los Angeles County)Los Angeles BasinBaldwin Hills (mountain Range)Santa Catalina Island (California)Channel Islands Of CaliforniaChino HillsHollywood HillsOxnard PlainPalos Verdes HillsPuente HillsSan Fernando ValleySan Gabriel MountainsSan Gabriel ValleySan Jacinto MountainsSanta Ana MountainsSanta Monica MountainsSanta Susana MountainsSierra Pelona MountainsSimi HillsVerdugo MountainsLos Angeles RiverAliso Creek (Orange County)Arroyo CalabasasArroyo Seco (Los Angeles County)Ballona CreekBell Creek (Southern California)Big Bear LakeCoyote Creek (San Gabriel River)Lake Arrowhead ReservoirLake Gregory (California)Lake PerrisLake PiruLos Angeles AqueductMalibu CreekMojave RiverPacific OceanPyramid Lake (Los Angeles County, California)Rio Hondo (California)San Gabriel River (California)San Juan CreekSan Pedro Bay (California)Santa Ana RiverSanta Clara River (California)Santa Margarita RiverSanta Monica BayTujunga WashTemplate:California Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate Talk:California Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationMayorList Of United States Cities By PopulationCaliforniaEric GarcettiLos AngelesKevin FaulconerSan DiegoSam LiccardoSan Jose, CaliforniaLondon BreedSan FranciscoLee BrandFresno, CaliforniaDarrell SteinbergSacramento, CaliforniaRobert Garcia (California Politician)Long Beach, CaliforniaLibby SchaafOakland, CaliforniaKaren GohBakersfield, CaliforniaTom TaitAnaheim, CaliforniaMiguel A. PulidoSanta Ana, CaliforniaRiverside, CaliforniaAnthony Silva (politician)Stockton, CaliforniaMary SalasChula Vista, CaliforniaDonald P. WagnerIrvine, CaliforniaFremont, CaliforniaR. Carey DavisSan Bernardino, CaliforniaModesto, CaliforniaFontana, CaliforniaOxnard, CaliforniaMoreno Valley, CaliforniaHuntington BeachGlendale, CaliforniaSanta Clarita, CaliforniaOceanside, CaliforniaBao NguyenGarden Grove, CaliforniaRancho Cucamonga, CaliforniaSanta Rosa, CaliforniaOntario, CaliforniaElk Grove, CaliforniaEugene MontanezLancaster, CaliforniaPalmdale, CaliforniaBarbara HallidayHayward, CaliforniaSalinas, CaliforniaPomona, CaliforniaSunnyvale, CaliforniaEscondido, CaliforniaTorrance, CaliforniaTerry TornekPasadena, CaliforniaOrange, CaliforniaFullerton, CaliforniaRoseville, CaliforniaVisalia, CaliforniaThousand Oaks, CaliforniaTim GraysonConcord, CaliforniaSimi Valley, CaliforniaSanta Clara, CaliforniaVictorville, CaliforniaVallejo, CaliforniaJesse ArreguínBerkeley, CaliforniaAndre QuinteroEl Monte, CaliforniaDowney, CaliforniaCarlsbad, CaliforniaCosta Mesa, CaliforniaFairfield, CaliforniaTemecula, CaliforniaJames T. Butts Jr.Inglewood, CaliforniaAntioch, CaliforniaMurrieta, CaliforniaVentura, CaliforniaTom ButtRichmond, CaliforniaWest Covina, CaliforniaNorwalk, CaliforniaDaly City, CaliforniaBurbank, CaliforniaSanta Maria, CaliforniaClovis, CaliforniaEl Cajon, CaliforniaSan Mateo, CaliforniaVista, CaliforniaJurupa Valley, CaliforniaTemplate:Alabama Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Arizona Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:California Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Colorado Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Connecticut Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Florida Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Georgia (U.S. State) Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Illinois Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Indiana Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Iowa Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Kansas Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Louisiana Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Massachusetts Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Michigan Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Minnesota Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Missouri Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Nevada Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:New Jersey Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:New York Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:North Carolina Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Ohio Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Oklahoma Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Oregon Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Pennsylvania Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Tennessee Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Texas Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Utah Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Virginia Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Washington Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationTemplate:Wisconsin Cities And Mayors Of 100,000 PopulationHelp:CategoryCategory:Corona, CaliforniaCategory:1896 Establishments In CaliforniaCategory:Cities In Riverside County, CaliforniaCategory:Elsinore TroughCategory:Incorporated Cities And Towns In CaliforniaCategory:Populated Places Established In 1886Category:Populated Places Established In 1896Category:Populated Places On The Santa Ana RiverCategory:Pages With Citations Lacking TitlesCategory:Pages With Citations Having Bare URLsCategory:Webarchive Template Wayback LinksCategory:Articles With Inconsistent Citation FormatsCategory:Use Mdy Dates From December 2014Category:Coordinates On WikidataCategory:All Articles With Unsourced StatementsCategory:Articles With Unsourced Statements From October 2009Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From April 2015Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From February 2016Category:Articles Needing Additional References From April 2012Category:All Articles Needing Additional ReferencesCategory:Articles With DMOZ LinksDiscussion About Edits From This IP Address [n]A List Of Edits Made From This IP Address [y]View The Content Page [c]Discussion About The Content Page [t]Edit This Page [e]Visit The Main Page [z]Guides To Browsing WikipediaFeatured Content – The Best Of WikipediaFind Background Information On Current EventsLoad A Random Article [x]Guidance On How To Use And Edit WikipediaFind Out About WikipediaAbout The Project, What You Can Do, Where To Find ThingsA List Of Recent Changes In The Wiki [r]List Of All English Wikipedia Pages Containing Links To This Page [j]Recent Changes In Pages Linked From This Page [k]Upload Files [u]A List Of All Special Pages [q]Wikipedia:AboutWikipedia:General Disclaimer



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