Contents 1 Sampling 2 Residence definitions 3 Enumeration strategies 4 Technology 5 Census and development 6 Uses of census data 6.1 Census data and research 7 Privacy 8 Historical censuses 8.1 Egypt 8.2 Ancient Greece 8.3 Ancient Israel 8.4 China 8.5 India 8.6 Rome 8.7 Rashidun and Umayyad Caliphates 8.8 Medieval Europe 8.9 Inca Empire 8.10 Spanish Empire 9 World population estimates 10 Modern implementation 11 See also 12 Notes 13 References 14 External links


Sampling[edit] A census is often construed as the opposite of a sample as its intent is to count everyone in a population rather than a fraction. However, population censuses rely on a sampling frame to count the population. This is the only way to be sure that everyone has been included as otherwise those not responding would not be followed up on and individuals could be missed. The fundamental premise of a census is that the population is not known and a new estimate is to be made by the analysis of primary data. The use of a sampling frame is counterintuitive as it suggests that the population size is already known. However, a census is also used to collect attribute data on the individuals in the nation. This process of sampling marks the difference between historical census, which was a house to house process or the product of an imperial decree, and the modern statistical project. The sampling frame used by census is almost always an address register. Thus it is not known if there is anyone resident or how many people there are in each household. Depending on the mode of enumeration, a form is sent to the householder, an enumerator calls, or administrative records for the dwelling are accessed. As a preliminary to the dispatch of forms, census workers will check any address problems on the ground. While it may seem straightforward to use the postal service file for this purpose, this can be out of date and some dwellings may contain a number of independent households. A particular problem is what are termed 'communal establishments' which category includes student residences, religious orders, homes for the elderly, people in prisons etc. As these are not easily enumerated by a single householder, they are often treated differently and visited by special teams of census workers to ensure they are classified appropriately.


Residence definitions[edit] Individuals are normally counted within households and information is typically collected about the household structure and the housing. For this reason international documents refer to censuses of population and housing. Normally the census response is made by a household, indicating details of individuals resident there. An important aspect of census enumerations is determining which individuals can be counted from which cannot be counted. Broadly, three definitions can be used: de facto residence; de jure residence; and, permanent residence. This is important to consider individuals who have multiple or temporary addresses. Every person should be identified uniquely as resident in one place but where they happen to be on Census Day, their de facto residence, may not be the best place to count them. Where an individual uses services may be more useful and this is at their usual, or de jure, residence. An individual may be represented at a permanent address, perhaps a family home for students or long term migrants. It is necessary to have a precise definition of residence to decide whether visitors to a country should be included in the population count. This is becoming more important as students travel abroad for education for a period of several years. Other groups causing problems of enumeration are new born babies, refugees, people away on holiday, people moving home around census day, and people without a fixed address. People having second homes because of working in another part of the country or retaining a holiday cottage are difficult to fix at a particular address sometimes causing double counting or houses being mistakenly identified as vacant. Another problem is where people use a different address at different times e.g. students living at their place of education in term time but returning to a family home during vacations or children whose parents have separated who effectively have two family homes. Census enumeration has always been based on finding people where they live as there is no systematic alternative - any list you could use to find people is derived from census activities in the first place. Recent UN guidelines provide recommendation on enumerating such complex households.[5]


Enumeration strategies[edit] Historical censuses used crude enumeration assuming absolute accuracy. Modern approaches take into account the problems of overcount and undercount, and the coherence of census enumerations with other official sources of data.[6] This reflects a realist approach to measurement, acknowledging that under any definition of residence there is a true value of the population but this can never be measured with complete accuracy. An important aspect of the census process is to evaluate the quality of the data.[7] Many countries use a post-enumeration survey to adjust the raw census counts.[8] This works in a similar manner to capture-recapture estimation for animal populations. In census circles this method is called dual system enumeration (DSE). A sample of households are visited by interviewers who record the details of the household as at census day. These data are then matched to census records and the number of people missed can be estimated by considering the number missed in the census or survey but counted in the other. This way counts can be adjusted for non-response varying between different demographic groups. An explanation using a fishing analogy can be found in "Trout, Catfish and Roach..."[9] which won an award from the Royal Statistical Society for excellence in official statistics in 2011. Enumerator conducting a survey using a mobile phone based questionnaire in rural Zimbabwe. Triple system enumeration has been proposed as an improvement as it would allow evaluation of the statistical dependence of pairs of sources. However, as the matching process is the most difficult aspect of census estimation this has never been implemented for a national enumeration. It would also be difficult to identify three different sources that were sufficiently different to make the triple system effort worthwhile. The DSE approach has another weakness in that it assumes there is no person counted twice (over count). In de facto residence definitions this would not be a problem but in de jure definitions individuals risk being recorded on more than one form leading to double counting. A particular problem here are students who often have a term time and family address. Several countries have used a system which is known as short form/long form.[10] This is a sampling strategy which randomly chooses a proportion of people to send a more detailed questionnaire to (the long form). Everyone receives the short form questions. Thereby more data are collected but not imposing a burden on the whole population. This also reduces the burden on the statistical office. Indeed, in the UK all residents were required to fill in the whole form but only a 10% sample were coded and analysed in detail, until 2001.[11] New technology means that all data are now scanned and processed. Recently there has been controversy in Canada about the cessation of the long form with the head, Munir Sheikh resigning.[12] The use of alternative enumeration strategies is increasing[13] but these are not so simple as many people assume and only occur in developed countries.[14] The Netherlands has been most advanced in adopting a census using administrative data. This allows a simulated census to be conducted by linking several different administrative databases at an agreed time. Data can be matched and an overall enumeration established accounting for where the different sources are discrepant. A validation survey is still conducted in a similar way to the post enumeration survey employed in a traditional census. Other countries which have a population register use this as a basis for all the census statistics needed by users. This is most common amongst Nordic countries but requires a large number of different registers to be combined including population, housing, employment and education. These registers are then combined and brought up to the standard of a statistical register by comparing the data in different sources and ensuring the quality is sufficient for official statistics to be produced.[15] A recent innovation is the French instigation of a rolling census programme with different regions enumerated each year such that the whole country is completely enumerated every 5 to 10 years.[16] In Europe, in connection with the 2010 census round, a large number of countries adopted alternative census methodologies, often based on the combination of data from registers, surveys and other sources.[17]


Technology[edit] Censuses have evolved in their use of technology with the latest censuses, the 2010 round, using many new types of computing. In Brazil, handheld devices were used by enumerators to locate residences on the ground. In many countries, census returns could be made via the Internet as well as in paper form. DSE is facilitated by computer matching techniques which can be automated, such as propensity score matching. In the UK, all census formats are scanned and stored electronically before being destroyed, replacing the need for physical archives. The record linking to perform an administrative census would not be possible without large databases being stored on computer systems. New technology is not without problems in its introduction. The US census had intended to use the handheld computers but cost escalated and this was abandoned, with the contract being sold to Brazil. Online response is a good idea but one of the functions of census is to make sure everyone is counted accurately. A system which allowed people to enter their address without verification would be open to abuse. Therefore, households have to be verified on the ground, typically by an enumerator visit or post out. Paper forms are still necessary for those without access to Internet connections. It is also possible that the hidden nature of an administrative census means that users are not engaged with the importance of contributing their data to official statistics. Alternatively, population estimations may be carried out remotely with GIS and remote sensing technologies.[18]


Census and development[edit] According to UNFPA, “The information generated by a population and housing census – numbers of people, their distribution, their living conditions and other key data – is critical for development.” [19] This is because this type of data is essential for policymakers so that they know where to invest. Unfortunately, many countries have outdated or inaccurate data about their populations and therefore, without accurate data are unable to address the needs of their population. UNFPA stated that,[19] “The unique advantage of the census is that it represents the entire statistical universe, down to the smallest geographical units, of a country or region. Planners need this information for all kinds of development work, including: assessing demographic trends; analysing socio-economic conditions;[20] designing evidence-based poverty-reduction strategies; monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of policies; and tracking progress toward national and internationally agreed development goals.” In addition to making policymakers aware about population issues, it is also an important tool for identifying forms of social, demographic or economic exclusions, such as inequalities relating to race, ethics and religion as well as disadvantaged groups such as those with disabilities and the poor. An accurate census can empower local communities by providing them with the necessary information to participate in local decision-making and ensuring they are represented.


Uses of census data[edit] In the nineteenth century, the first censuses collected paper enumerations that had to be collated by hand so the statistical uses were very basic. The government owned the data and were able to publish statistics themselves on the state of the nation.[21] Uses were to measure changes in the population and apportion representation. Population estimates could be compared to those of other countries. By the beginning of the twentieth century, censuses were recording households and some indications of their employment. In some countries, census archives are released for public examination after many decades, allowing genealogists to track the ancestry of interested people. Archives provide a substantial historical record which may challenge established notions of tradition. It is also possible to understand the societal history through job titles and arrangements for the destitute and sick. There are a lot of politics that surround the census in many countries. In Canada in 2010 for example, the government under the leadership of Stephen Harper abolished the mandatory long-form census. The decision to cut the long-form census was a response to protests from some Canadians who resented the personal questions. [22] The long-form census was reinstated by the Justin Trudeau government in 2016. Census data and research[edit] As governments assumed responsibility for schooling and welfare, large government research departments made extensive use of census data. Actuarial estimates could be made to project populations and plan for provision in local government and regions. It was also possible for central government to allocate funding on the basis of census data. Even into the mid twentieth century, census data was only directly accessible to large government departments. However, computers meant that tabulations could be used directly by university researchers, large businesses and local government offices. They could use the detail of the data to answer new questions and add to local and specialist knowledge. Now, census data are published in a wide variety of formats to be accessible to business, all levels of governance, media, students and teachers, charities and any citizen who is interested; researchers in particular have an interest in the role of Census Field Officers (CFO) and their assistants.[23] Data can be represented visually or analysed in complex statistical models, to show the difference between certain areas, or to understand the association between different personal characteristics. Census data offer a unique insight into small areas and small demographic groups which sample data would be unable to capture with precision.


Privacy[edit] Although the census provides a useful way of obtaining statistical information about a population, such information can sometimes lead to abuses, political or otherwise, made possible by the linking of individuals' identities to anonymous census data.[24] This consideration is particularly important when individuals' census responses are made available in microdata form, but even aggregate-level data can result in privacy breaches when dealing with small areas and/or rare subpopulations. For instance, when reporting data from a large city, it might be appropriate to give the average income for black males aged between 50 and 60. However, doing this for a town that only has two black males in this age group would be a breach of privacy because either of those persons, knowing his own income and the reported average, could determine the other man's income. Typically, census data are processed to obscure such individual information. Some agencies do this by intentionally introducing small statistical errors to prevent the identification of individuals in marginal populations;[25] others swap variables for similar respondents. Whatever measures have been taken to reduce the privacy risk in census data, new technology in the form of better electronic analysis of data poses increasing challenges to the protection of sensitive individual information. This is known as statistical disclosure control. Another possibility is to present survey results by means of statistical models in the form of a multivariate distribution mixture.[26] The statistical information in the form of conditional distributions (histograms) can be derived interactively from the estimated mixture model without any further access to the original database. As the final product does not contain any protected microdata, the model based interactive software can be distributed without any confidentiality concerns. Another method is simply to release no data at all, except very large scale data directly to the central government. Different release strategies between government have led to an international project (IPUMS) to co-ordinate access to microdata and corresponding metadata. Such projects also promote standardising metadata by projects such as SDMX so that best use can be made of the minimal data available.


Historical censuses[edit] Egypt[edit] Censuses in Egypt first appears in the late Middle Kingdom and develops in the New Kingdom[27] Pharaoh Amasis, according to Herodotus, require every Egyptian to declare annually to the nomarch, "whence he gained his living".[28] Under the Ptolemies and the Romans several censuses were conducted in Egypt by governments officials [29] Ancient Greece[edit] There are several accounts of ancient Greek city states carrying out censuses.[30] Ancient Israel[edit] Censuses are mentioned in the Bible. God commands a per capita tax to be paid with the census in Exodus 30:11-16 for the upkeep of the Tabernacle. The Book of Numbers is named after the counting of the Israelite population (in Numbers 1-4) according to the house of the Fathers after the exodus from Egypt. A second census was taken while the Israelite were camped in the plains of Moab, in Numbers 26. King David performed a census that produced disastrous results (in 2 Samuel 24 and 1 Chronicles 21). His son, King Solomon, had all of the foreigners in Israel counted in 2 Chronicles 2:17. When the Romans took over Judea in AD 6, the legate Publius Sulpicius Quirinius organised a census for tax purposes. The Gospel of Luke links the birth of Jesus to this event. Luke 2. China[edit] One of the world's earliest preserved censuses[31] was held in China in AD 2 during the Han Dynasty, and is still considered by scholars to be quite accurate.[32][33][34][35] Another census was held in AD 144. India[edit] The oldest recorded census in India is thought to have occurred around 300 BC during the reign of The Emperor Chandragupta Maurya under the leadership of Kautilya or Chanakya and Ashoka.[36] Rome[edit] See also: Roman censor and Indiction The word "census" originated in ancient Rome from the Latin word censere ("to estimate"). The census played a crucial role in the administration of the Roman Empire, as it was used to determine taxes. With few interruptions, it was usually carried out every five years.[37] It provided a register of citizens and their property from which their duties and privileges could be listed. It is said to have been instituted by the Roman king Servius Tullius in the 6th century BC,[38] at which time the number of arms-bearing citizens was supposedly counted at around 80,000.[39] The 6 AD "census of Quirinius" undertaken following the imposition of direct Roman rule in Judea was partially responsible for the development of the Zealot movement and several failed rebellions against Rome that ended in the Diaspora. The 15-year indiction cycle established by Diocletian in AD 297 was based on quindecennial censuses and formed the basis for dating in late antiquity and under the Byzantine Empire. Rashidun and Umayyad Caliphates[edit] In the Middle Ages, the Caliphate began conducting regular censuses soon after its formation, beginning with the one ordered by the second Rashidun caliph, Umar.[40] Medieval Europe[edit] The Domesday Book was undertaken in AD 1086 by William I of England so that he could properly tax the land he had recently conquered in medieval Europe. In 1183, a census was taken of the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, to ascertain the number of men and amount of money that could possibly be raised against an invasion by Saladin, sultan of Egypt and Syria. Inca Empire[edit] In the 15th century, the Inca Empire had a unique way to record census information. The Incas did not have any written language but recorded information collected during censuses and other numeric information as well as non-numeric data on quipus, strings from llama or alpaca hair or cotton cords with numeric and other values encoded by knots in a base-10 positional system. Spanish Empire[edit] On May 25, 1577, King Philip II of Spain ordered by royal cédula the preparation of a general description of Spain's holdings in the Indies. Instructions and a questionnaire, issued in 1577 by the Office of the Cronista Mayor, were distributed to local officials in the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru to direct the gathering of information. The questionnaire, composed of fifty items, was designed to elicit basic information about the nature of the land and the life of its peoples. The replies, known as "relaciones geográficas," were written between 1579 and 1585 and were returned to the Cronista Mayor in Spain by the Council of the Indies.


World population estimates[edit] The earliest estimate of the world population was made by Giovanni Battista Riccioli in 1661; the next by Johann Peter Süssmilch in 1741, revised in 1762; the third by Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Dieterici in 1859.[41] In 1931 Walter Willcox published a table in his book, International Migrations: Volume II Interpretations, that estimated the 1929 world population to be roughly 1.8 billion. League of Nations and International Statistical Institute estimates of the world population in 1929


Modern implementation[edit] Main article: Population and housing censuses by country Nigerian leaders cannot put a number on the amount of Nigerian women and girls that have gone missing. Nigeria has never had a credible, successful census. —Olúfémi Táíwò, professor of Africana studies at Cornell University[42]


See also[edit] Languages in censuses Liber Censuum Race and ethnicity in censuses Social research


Notes[edit] ^ United Nations (2008). Principles and Recommendations for Population and Housing Censuses. Statistical Papers: Series M No. 67/Rev.2. p8. ISBN 978-92-1-161505-0. ^ "CES 2010 Census Recommendations" (PDF). Unece.org. Retrieved 2013-11-19.  ^ "History and Development of the Census in England and Wales". theforgottenfamily.wordpress.org. Retrieved 2017-01-20.  ^ Salant, Priscilla, and Don A. Dillman. "How to Conduct your own Survey: Leading professional give you proven techniques for getting reliable results." (1995). ^ "Measurement of emerging forms of families and households". UNECE. Retrieved 2012-12-12.  ^ "Census Quality Evaluation: considerations from an international perspective". Unstats.un.org. Retrieved 2012-02-19.  ^ Breiman, Leo (1994). "The 1991 Census Adjustment: Undercount or Bad Data?". Statistical Science. 9 (4): 458–475.  ^ World Population and Housing Census Programme (2010) Post Enumeration Surveys: Operational guidelines, United Nations Secretariat, Dept of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistics Division, Tech Report ^ Benton, P. Trout, Catfish and Roach: The beginner’s guide to census population estimates, Office for National Statistics, UK ^ Other methods of census taking, Office for National Statistics, UK ^ "Introduction to Census 2001". Ons.gov.uk. 2001-04-29. Retrieved 2012-12-12.  ^ The Canadian Press (2010-07-21). "Text of Munir Sheikh's resignation statement". 680News. Archived from the original on 2011-12-19. Retrieved 2012-02-19.  ^ "[INED] Population and Societies". Ined.fr. Retrieved 2012-02-19.  ^ Kukutai, Tahu (2014). "Whither the census? Continuity and change in census methodologies worldwide, 1985–2014". Journal of Population Research. 32: 3–22. doi:10.1007/s12546-014-9139-z.  ^ "Register-based statistics in the Nordic countries" (PDF). Unece.org. 2007. Retrieved 2012-12-12.  ^ Durr, Jean-Michel and François Clanché. "The French Rolling Census: a decade of experience" (PDF).  ^ "2010 Population Census Round - Confluence". .unece.org. Retrieved 2012-12-12.  ^ Biljecki, F.; Arroyo Ohori, K.; Ledoux, H.; Peters, R.; Stoter, J. (2016). "Population Estimation Using a 3D City Model: A Multi-Scale Country-Wide Study in the Netherlands". PLOS ONE. 11 (6): e0156808. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0156808. PMC 4890761 . PMID 27254151.  ^ a b "Census | UNFPA - United Nations Population Fund". UNFPA.org. Retrieved 2016-07-20.  ^ Corcos, Nick (2017). "Excavations and Watching Brief at the Corner of Wade Street and Little Anne Street, St Jude's, Bristol, 2014". Internet Archaeology (45). doi:10.11141/ia.45.3.  ^ Kathrin Levitan (auth.), A Cultural History of the British Census: Envisioning the Multitude in the Nineteenth Century, 978-1-349-29824-2, 978-0-230-33760-2 Palgrave Macmillan US 2011. ^ Jennifer Ditchburn (June 29, 2010). "Tories scrap mandatory long-form census". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved September 23, 2017.  ^ Morphy, Frances. "Agency, Contingency and Census Process: Observations of the 2006 Indigenous Enumeration Strategy in Remote Aboriginal Australia". ANU E Press, 2007. Retrieved 19 July 2016. One researcher spent time observing... the training of Census Field Officers (CFO) and their assistants....  ^ "The Census and Privacy". EPIC.org. Retrieved 2016-07-20.  ^ "Managing Confidentiality and Learning about SEIFA". Abs.gov.au. 2006-04-18. Retrieved 2010-11-30.  ^ Grim J, Hora J, Somol P, Boček P, Pudil, P (2010). "Statistical Model of the 2001 Czech Census for Interactive Presentation". Journal of Official Statistics, vol. 26, no. 4. pp. 673–694.  ^ D. Valbelle. "Les recensements dans l'Egypte pharaonique des troisième et deuxième millénaires" CRIPEL 9 (1987) 37 - 49. ^ Herodotus, Histories II, 177, 2 ^ Paul Cartledge,Peter Garnsey,Erich S. Gruen Hellenistic Constructs: Essays in Culture, History, and Historiography 242 ss. ^ Missiakoulis, Spyros (2010). "Cecrops, King of Athens: the First (?) Recorded Population Census in History". International Statistical Review. 78 (3): 413–418. doi:10.1111/j.1751-5823.2010.00124.x.  ^ Robert Hymes (2000). John Stewart Bowman, ed. Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture. Columbia University Press. p. 12. ISBN 978-0-231-11004-4.  ^ Jeffrey Hays. "China - Facts and Details: Han Dynasty (206 B.C. - A.D. 220)". Archived from the original on 2010-11-23.  ^ Twitchett, D., Loewe, M., and Fairbank, J.K. Cambridge History of China: The Ch'in and Han Empires 221 B.C.-A.D. 220. Cambridge University Press (1986), p. 240. ^ Nishijima (1986), 595–596.[full citation needed] ^ Yoon, H. (1985). "An early Chinese idea of a dynamic environmental cycle". GeoJournal. 10 (2): 211–212. doi:10.1007/bf00150742.  ^ "Census Commissioner of India - Historical Background". Govt. of India. The records of census conducted appears from 300 BC.  ^ Scheidel, Walter (2009) Rome and China: comparative perspectives on ancient world empires. Oxford University Press, p. 28. ^ Livy Ab urbe condita 1.42 ^ Livy Ab urbe condita 1.42, citing Fabius Pictor ^ al-Qādī1, Wadād (July 2008). "Population Census and Land Surveys under the Umayyads (41–132/661–750)". Der Islam. 83 (2): 341–416. doi:10.1515/ISLAM.2006.015.  ^ Willcox, Walter (1931). "International Migrations, Volume II: Interpretations" (PDF). NBER.  ^ "Africana professor issues call for modernity in Africa". Cornell. 28 May 2015. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 


References[edit] Alterman, Hyman, (1969). Counting People: The Census in History. Harcourt, Brace & Company. Bielenstein, Hans, (1978). "Wang Mang, the restoration of the Han dynasty, and Later Han." In The Cambridge History of China, vol. 1, eds. Denis Twitchett and John K. Fairbank, p. 223-90, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Krüger, Stephen, (Fall 1991). "The Decennial Census", 19 Western State University Law Review 1; available at HeinOnline (subscription required). Effects of UK 'Jedi' hoax on 2001 UK census from ONS. U.S. Census Press Release on 1930 Census. U.S. Census Press Release on Soundex and WPA.


External links[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Census.  "Census". Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). 1911.  Census of Ireland 1911. Online Historical Population Reports Project (OHPR). PR as a function of census management: comparative analysis of fifteen census experiences v t e Statistics Outline Index Descriptive statistics Continuous data Center Mean arithmetic geometric harmonic Median Mode Dispersion Variance Standard deviation Coefficient of variation Percentile Range Interquartile range Shape Central limit theorem Moments Skewness Kurtosis L-moments Count data Index of dispersion Summary tables Grouped data Frequency distribution Contingency table Dependence Pearson product-moment correlation Rank correlation Spearman's rho Kendall's tau Partial correlation Scatter plot Graphics Bar chart Biplot Box plot Control chart Correlogram Fan chart Forest plot Histogram Pie chart Q–Q plot Run chart Scatter plot Stem-and-leaf display Radar chart Data collection Study design Population Statistic Effect size Statistical power Sample size determination Missing data Survey methodology Sampling stratified cluster Standard error Opinion poll Questionnaire Controlled experiments Design control optimal Controlled trial Randomized Random assignment Replication Blocking Interaction Factorial experiment Uncontrolled studies Observational study Natural experiment Quasi-experiment Statistical inference Statistical theory Population Statistic Probability distribution Sampling distribution Order statistic Empirical distribution Density estimation Statistical model Lp space Parameter location scale shape Parametric family Likelihood (monotone) Location–scale family Exponential family Completeness Sufficiency Statistical functional Bootstrap U V Optimal decision loss function Efficiency Statistical distance divergence Asymptotics Robustness Frequentist inference Point estimation Estimating equations Maximum likelihood Method of moments M-estimator Minimum distance Unbiased estimators Mean-unbiased minimum-variance Rao–Blackwellization Lehmann–Scheffé theorem Median unbiased Plug-in Interval estimation Confidence interval Pivot Likelihood interval Prediction interval Tolerance interval Resampling Bootstrap Jackknife Testing hypotheses 1- & 2-tails Power Uniformly most powerful test Permutation test Randomization test Multiple comparisons Parametric tests Likelihood-ratio Wald Score Specific tests Z-test (normal) Student's t-test F-test Goodness of fit Chi-squared G-test Kolmogorov–Smirnov Anderson–Darling Lilliefors Jarque–Bera Normality (Shapiro–Wilk) Likelihood-ratio test Model selection Cross validation AIC BIC Rank statistics Sign Sample median Signed rank (Wilcoxon) Hodges–Lehmann estimator Rank sum (Mann–Whitney) Nonparametric anova 1-way (Kruskal–Wallis) 2-way (Friedman) Ordered alternative (Jonckheere–Terpstra) Bayesian inference Bayesian probability prior posterior Credible interval Bayes factor Bayesian estimator Maximum posterior estimator Correlation Regression analysis Correlation Pearson product-moment Partial correlation Confounding variable Coefficient of determination Regression analysis Errors and residuals Regression model validation Mixed effects models Simultaneous equations models Multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) Linear regression Simple linear regression Ordinary least squares General linear model Bayesian regression Non-standard predictors Nonlinear regression Nonparametric Semiparametric Isotonic Robust Heteroscedasticity Homoscedasticity Generalized linear model Exponential families Logistic (Bernoulli) / Binomial / Poisson regressions Partition of variance Analysis of variance (ANOVA, anova) Analysis of covariance Multivariate ANOVA Degrees of freedom Categorical / Multivariate / Time-series / Survival analysis Categorical Cohen's kappa Contingency table Graphical model Log-linear model McNemar's test Multivariate Regression Manova Principal components Canonical correlation Discriminant analysis Cluster analysis Classification Structural equation model Factor analysis Multivariate distributions Elliptical distributions Normal Time-series General Decomposition Trend Stationarity Seasonal adjustment Exponential smoothing Cointegration Structural break Granger causality Specific tests Dickey–Fuller Johansen Q-statistic (Ljung–Box) Durbin–Watson Breusch–Godfrey Time domain Autocorrelation (ACF) partial (PACF) Cross-correlation (XCF) ARMA model ARIMA model (Box–Jenkins) Autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH) Vector autoregression (VAR) Frequency domain Spectral density estimation Fourier analysis Wavelet Survival Survival function Kaplan–Meier estimator (product limit) Proportional hazards models Accelerated failure time (AFT) model First hitting time Hazard function Nelson–Aalen estimator Test Log-rank test Applications Biostatistics Bioinformatics Clinical trials / studies Epidemiology Medical statistics Engineering statistics Chemometrics Methods engineering Probabilistic design Process / quality control Reliability System identification Social statistics Actuarial science Census Crime statistics Demography Econometrics National accounts Official statistics Population statistics Psychometrics Spatial statistics Cartography Environmental statistics Geographic information system Geostatistics Kriging Category Portal Commons WikiProject Authority control GND: 4134368-2 BNF: cb11948225h (data) NDL: 00566454 Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Census&oldid=821238304" Categories: CensusesGenealogyPopulationSurvey methodologySampling (statistics)Latin words and phrasesHidden categories: Articles needing more detailed referencesArticles containing Spanish-language textPages containing links to subscription-only contentWikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica with Wikisource referenceWikipedia articles with GND identifiersWikipedia articles with BNF identifiers


Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog in Namespaces ArticleTalk Variants Views ReadEditView history More Search Navigation Main pageContentsFeatured contentCurrent eventsRandom articleDonate to WikipediaWikipedia store Interaction HelpAbout WikipediaCommunity portalRecent changesContact page Tools What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationWikidata itemCite this page Print/export Create a bookDownload as PDFPrintable version In other projects Wikimedia Commons Languages AfrikaansالعربيةAsturianuАварتۆرکجهবাংলাBân-lâm-gúБеларускаяБеларуская (тарашкевіца)‎भोजपुरीБългарскиBrezhonegCatalàЧӑвашлаČeštinaChiShonaCymraegDanskDeutschEestiΕλληνικάEspañolEsperantoEuskaraفارسیFrançaisFryskGaeilgeGalego한국어Հայերենहिन्दीHrvatskiIdoBahasa IndonesiaInterlinguaÍslenskaItalianoעבריתBasa Jawaಕನ್ನಡქართულიҚазақшаKiswahiliLatinaLatviešuLietuviųLimburgsMagyarМакедонскиമലയാളംमराठीBahasa MelayuМонголမြန်မာဘာသာNederlandsनेपाली日本語NorskNorsk nynorskਪੰਜਾਬੀپنجابیپښتوPiemontèisPlattdüütschPolskiPortuguêsRomânăRuna SimiРусскийScotsShqipසිංහලSimple EnglishسنڌيSlovenčinaSlovenščinaکوردیСрпски / srpskiSrpskohrvatski / српскохрватскиBasa SundaSuomiSvenskaTagalogதமிழ்Татарча/tatarçaతెలుగుТоҷикӣУкраїнськаاردوTiếng ViệtWinarayייִדיש粵語中文 Edit links This page was last edited on 19 January 2018, at 06:04. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Contact Wikipedia Developers Cookie statement Mobile view (window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgPageParseReport":{"limitreport":{"cputime":"0.820","walltime":"0.974","ppvisitednodes":{"value":3675,"limit":1000000},"ppgeneratednodes":{"value":0,"limit":1500000},"postexpandincludesize":{"value":255972,"limit":2097152},"templateargumentsize":{"value":26262,"limit":2097152},"expansiondepth":{"value":16,"limit":40},"expensivefunctioncount":{"value":0,"limit":500},"entityaccesscount":{"value":1,"limit":400},"timingprofile":["100.00% 791.782 1 -total"," 37.46% 296.577 1 Template:Reflist"," 21.68% 171.694 1 Template:Lang"," 14.30% 113.191 1 Template:Statistics"," 13.73% 108.703 1 Template:Navbox_with_collapsible_groups"," 12.61% 99.856 18 Template:Cite_web"," 7.65% 60.584 11 Template:Navbox"," 7.12% 56.369 4 Template:Bibleref"," 5.94% 47.023 1 Template:Full_citation_needed"," 5.63% 44.541 8 Template:Cite_journal"]},"scribunto":{"limitreport-timeusage":{"value":"0.442","limit":"10.000"},"limitreport-memusage":{"value":17564461,"limit":52428800}},"cachereport":{"origin":"mw1252","timestamp":"20180217145338","ttl":1900800,"transientcontent":false}}});});(window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgBackendResponseTime":94,"wgHostname":"mw1319"});});


Census - Photos and All Basic Informations

Census More Links

EnlargeRomani PeopleMobile HomeNetherlandsInformationStatistical PopulationPopulation And Housing Censuses By CountryUnited NationsLatin LanguageRoman RepublicInternational ComparisonsSampling (statistics)Intercensal EstimateMarketingOpinion PollStratified SamplingUtah V. EvansSampling FrameCensus DayHome RangeCapture-recaptureDemographicRoyal Statistical SocietyOfficial StatisticsEnlargeZimbabweSampling (statistics)Canada 2011 CensusMunir SheikhPropensity Score MatchingGISRemote SensingResearchResearchMicrodata (statistics)Statistical Disclosure ControlConditional Probability DistributionHistogramMixture DistributionIPUMSSDMXCensus In EgyptMiddle Kingdom Of EgyptNew KingdomAmasis IHerodotusNomarchPtolemiesRoman EgyptBibleTax Per HeadTabernacleBook Of NumbersMoabDavidSolomonCensus Of QuiriniusGospel Of LukeJesusHan DynastyChandragupta MauryaKautilyaAshokaRoman CensorIndictionAncient RomeLatinServius TulliusCensus Of QuiriniusRoman JudeaZealotJewish DiasporaIndictionDiocletianByzantine CalendarMiddle AgesCaliphateRashidun CaliphateCaliphUmarDomesday BookWilliam I Of EnglandCrusadeKingdom Of JerusalemSaladinEgyptSyriaInca EmpireQuipusLlamaAlpacaBase-10Philip II Of SpainGiovanni Battista RiccioliJohann Peter SüssmilchKarl Friedrich Wilhelm DietericiEnlargePopulation And Housing Censuses By CountryLanguages In CensusesLiber CensuumRace And Ethnicity In CensusesSocial ResearchInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/978-92-1-161505-0Statistical ScienceOffice For National StatisticsOffice For National StatisticsDigital Object IdentifierDigital Object IdentifierPubMed CentralPubMed IdentifierDigital Object IdentifierDigital Object IdentifierInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/978-0-231-11004-4Wikipedia:Citing SourcesGeoJournalDigital Object IdentifierWalter ScheidelLivyAb Urbe Condita (book)LivyAb Urbe Condita (book)Fabius PictorDigital Object IdentifierEncyclopædia Britannica Eleventh EditionTemplate:StatisticsTemplate Talk:StatisticsStatisticsOutline Of StatisticsList Of Statistics ArticlesDescriptive StatisticsContinuous Probability DistributionCentral TendencyMeanArithmetic MeanGeometric MeanHarmonic MeanMedianMode (statistics)Statistical DispersionVarianceStandard DeviationCoefficient Of VariationPercentileRange (statistics)Interquartile RangeShape Of The DistributionCentral Limit TheoremMoment (mathematics)SkewnessKurtosisL-momentCount DataIndex Of DispersionGrouped DataFrequency DistributionContingency TableCorrelation And DependencePearson Correlation CoefficientRank CorrelationSpearman's Rank Correlation CoefficientKendall Tau Rank Correlation CoefficientPartial CorrelationScatter PlotStatistical GraphicsBar ChartBiplotBox PlotControl ChartCorrelogramFan Chart (statistics)Forest PlotHistogramPie ChartQ–Q PlotRun ChartScatter PlotStem-and-leaf DisplayRadar ChartData CollectionPopulation (statistics)StatisticEffect SizeStatistical PowerSample Size DeterminationMissing DataSurvey MethodologySampling (statistics)Stratified SamplingCluster SamplingStandard ErrorOpinion PollQuestionnaireExperimentDesign Of ExperimentsScientific ControlOptimal DesignRandomized Controlled TrialRandomized ExperimentRandom AssignmentReplication (statistics)Blocking (statistics)Interaction (statistics)Factorial ExperimentObservational StudyNatural ExperimentQuasi-experimentStatistical InferenceStatistical TheoryPopulation (statistics)StatisticProbability DistributionSampling DistributionOrder StatisticEmpirical Distribution FunctionDensity EstimationStatistical ModelLp SpaceStatistical ParameterLocation ParameterScale ParameterShape ParameterParametric StatisticsLikelihood FunctionMonotone Likelihood RatioLocation–scale FamilyExponential FamilyCompleteness (statistics)Sufficient StatisticPlug-in PrincipleBootstrapping (statistics)U-statisticV-statisticOptimal DecisionLoss FunctionEfficiency (statistics)Statistical DistanceDivergence (statistics)Asymptotic Theory (statistics)Robust StatisticsFrequentist InferencePoint EstimationEstimating EquationsMaximum LikelihoodMethod Of Moments (statistics)M-estimatorMinimum Distance EstimationBias Of An EstimatorMinimum-variance Unbiased EstimatorRao–Blackwell TheoremLehmann–Scheffé TheoremMedian-unbiased EstimatorPlug-in PrincipleInterval EstimationConfidence IntervalPivotal QuantityLikelihood IntervalPrediction IntervalTolerance IntervalResampling (statistics)Bootstrapping (statistics)Jackknife ResamplingStatistical Hypothesis TestingOne- And Two-tailed TestsPower (statistics)Uniformly Most Powerful TestPermutation TestRandomization TestMultiple ComparisonsParametric StatisticsLikelihood-ratio TestWald TestScore TestZ-testStudent's T-testF-testGoodness Of FitChi-squared TestG-testKolmogorov–Smirnov TestAnderson–Darling TestLilliefors TestJarque–Bera TestShapiro–Wilk TestLikelihood-ratio TestModel SelectionCross-validation (statistics)Akaike Information CriterionBayesian Information CriterionRank StatisticsSign TestSample MedianWilcoxon Signed-rank TestHodges–Lehmann EstimatorMann–Whitney U TestNonparametric StatisticsAnalysis Of VarianceKruskal–Wallis One-way Analysis Of VarianceFriedman TestJonckheere's Trend TestBayesian InferenceBayesian ProbabilityPrior ProbabilityPosterior ProbabilityCredible IntervalBayes FactorBayes EstimatorMaximum A Posteriori EstimationCorrelation And DependenceRegression AnalysisCorrelation And DependencePearson Product-moment Correlation CoefficientPartial CorrelationConfoundingCoefficient Of DeterminationRegression AnalysisErrors And Residuals In StatisticsRegression Model ValidationMixed ModelSimultaneous Equations ModelMultivariate Adaptive Regression SplinesLinear RegressionSimple Linear RegressionOrdinary Least SquaresGeneral Linear ModelBayesian Linear RegressionNonlinear RegressionNonparametric RegressionSemiparametric RegressionIsotonic RegressionRobust RegressionHeteroscedasticityHomoscedasticityGeneralized Linear ModelExponential FamilyLogistic RegressionBinomial RegressionPoisson RegressionPartition Of Sums Of SquaresAnalysis Of VarianceAnalysis Of CovarianceMultivariate Analysis Of VarianceDegrees Of Freedom (statistics)Categorical VariableMultivariate StatisticsTime SeriesSurvival AnalysisCategorical VariableCohen's KappaContingency TableGraphical ModelPoisson RegressionMcNemar's TestMultivariate StatisticsGeneral Linear ModelMultivariate Analysis Of VariancePrincipal Component AnalysisCanonical CorrelationLinear Discriminant AnalysisCluster AnalysisStatistical ClassificationStructural Equation ModelingFactor AnalysisMultivariate DistributionElliptical DistributionMultivariate Normal DistributionTime SeriesDecomposition Of Time SeriesTrend EstimationStationary ProcessSeasonal AdjustmentExponential SmoothingCointegrationStructural BreakGranger CausalityDickey–Fuller TestJohansen TestLjung–Box TestDurbin–Watson StatisticBreusch–Godfrey TestTime DomainAutocorrelationPartial Autocorrelation FunctionCross-correlationAutoregressive–moving-average ModelBox–Jenkins MethodAutoregressive Conditional HeteroskedasticityVector AutoregressionFrequency DomainSpectral Density EstimationFourier AnalysisWaveletSurvival AnalysisSurvival FunctionKaplan–Meier EstimatorProportional Hazards ModelAccelerated Failure Time ModelFirst-hitting-time ModelFailure RateNelson–Aalen EstimatorLog-rank TestList Of Fields Of Application Of StatisticsBiostatisticsBioinformaticsClinical TrialClinical Study DesignEpidemiologyMedical StatisticsEngineering StatisticsChemometricsMethods EngineeringProbabilistic DesignStatistical Process ControlQuality ControlReliability EngineeringSystem IdentificationSocial StatisticsActuarial ScienceCrime StatisticsDemographic StatisticsEconometricsNational AccountsOfficial StatisticsPopulation StatisticsPsychometricsSpatial AnalysisCartographyEnvironmental StatisticsGeographic Information SystemGeostatisticsKrigingCategory:StatisticsPortal:StatisticsWikipedia:WikiProject StatisticsHelp:Authority ControlIntegrated Authority FileBibliothèque Nationale De FranceNational Diet LibraryHelp:CategoryCategory:CensusesCategory:GenealogyCategory:PopulationCategory:Survey MethodologyCategory:Sampling (statistics)Category:Latin Words And PhrasesCategory:Articles Needing More Detailed ReferencesCategory:Articles Containing Spanish-language TextCategory:Pages Containing Links To Subscription-only ContentCategory:Wikipedia Articles Incorporating A Citation From The 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica With Wikisource ReferenceCategory:Wikipedia Articles With GND IdentifiersCategory:Wikipedia Articles With BNF IdentifiersDiscussion About Edits From This IP Address [n]A List Of Edits Made From This IP Address [y]View The Content Page [c]Discussion About The Content Page [t]Edit This Page [e]Visit The Main Page [z]Guides To Browsing WikipediaFeatured Content – The Best Of WikipediaFind Background Information On Current EventsLoad A Random Article [x]Guidance On How To Use And Edit WikipediaFind Out About WikipediaAbout The Project, What You Can Do, Where To Find ThingsA List Of Recent Changes In The Wiki [r]List Of All English Wikipedia Pages Containing Links To This Page [j]Recent Changes In Pages Linked From This Page [k]Upload Files [u]A List Of All Special Pages [q]Wikipedia:AboutWikipedia:General Disclaimer



view link view link view link view link view link